Jump to content

1018 for an anvil???


Recommended Posts

I know it doenst have alot of carbon content but I found some big chunks of it fairly cheap..

 

Before anyone says it I have yet to find a scrap yard willing to let me look around there yards I live in Phila PA so not sure if this will work or not as an Anvil any advise that be great

Link to post
Share on other sites

4140 is a very good anvil material. IF you can get it surface hardened. Actually, it's usually tough enough on its own to use for light-duty pounding. If it's a relatively small chunk you can also oil-quench it and torch temper.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I know it doenst have alot of carbon content but I found some big chunks of it fairly cheap..

 

Before anyone says it I have yet to find a scrap yard willing to let me look around there yards I live in Phila PA so not sure if this will work or not as an Anvil any advise that be great

 

JUST TELL THE SCRAP YARD YOU WORK FOR MYTH BUSTERS AND NEED I BIG CHUNK OF STEEL FOR A SHOW AND YOU WILL MENTION THE YARD ON TV always works

 

tell

Terence.........(today started off perfect now --- watch sombody come and stuff it up ]

 

if it aint broke dont fix it

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you have enough heat and a big tank you could "superquench" the 1018 to toughen it up.As to the 40xx series steels they are pretty tough as is. I have been told by professional in the heat treating field that it is not a good idea to try and regionaly harden the 40xx steels. Have I been misinformed?

WAXING MOON FORGE

 

 

The blacksmith and the artist

reflect it in their art

they forge their creativity

closer to the heart.

 

Rush

Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry to double post but another thought came to mind. Is the chunk of 1018 actually 1018?

I ask this in reference to the steel industry's use of the designation A-36. The modern steel folks came up with this some time back and use it on what they term "mild" steel. If the chunk is not really old and is hot rolled I would bet that it is A-36. This steel could have up to 36 points of carbon in it or it could be 1018. Unless it was specificly ordered as 1018 ( and it costs extra to get real 1018)it could be "ODH"(old datsun hoods)or something similar.

 

The upside is that if it is A-36 it will respond well to "superquenching".

 

 

Disclaimer: I am not speaking ill of the steel industry I'm just trying to point out possible pitfalls to a fellow smith. And as always I could be wrong. If so please educate me.(gently)

 

Thanks

Danile Piotte

WAXING MOON FORGE

 

 

The blacksmith and the artist

reflect it in their art

they forge their creativity

closer to the heart.

 

Rush

Link to post
Share on other sites

A-36 will only be in the range of .23 C. It's actually weaker then 1018.

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I use a big block of mild steel as an anvil...been using it for years. I always meant to replace it with a "real" anvil, just never got around to it. It's quite soft, but works nicely as long as you don't hit the face with the cross-peen too often...as mentioned, it's good practice in hammer control.

 

The upside of the soft face is that you can use a hammer to smooth it out again when it gets dented up (which probably work-hardens the face a bit, too).

My hand-forged knives and tools at Etsy.com: http://www.etsy.com/shop/oldschooltools

Link to post
Share on other sites

And you have the option of getting a 1" thick plate of 4142, HT it and then attach it to the top with some brackets. Or have a welder hard face it and then mill it flat.

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is my understanding that the A36 designation is based on minimum physical properties with no reference to carbon or chemistry. So it can have all kinds of alloy, lower carbon, higher carbon, steels mixed in as long as it meets a minimum 36 ksi yield strength and roughly 70ksi ultimate tensile strength. So it can vary quite a bit in chemistry. It often contains recycled automobiles among other things So I hear.

 

1018 is defined by its chemistry. The carbon has to fall within a designated range (.15 to.20 percent) It also has manganese .60 to .90 percent. And besides a pinch of P and S anything else should be trace.

In my work I avoid A36 as the variable chemistry makes it a real headache sometimes.

patrick :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
It is my understanding that the A36 designation is based on minimum physical properties with no reference to carbon or chemistry
.

 

Spot on Patrick ! :)

 

If it is what you can get, and it is the best option available at the moment, get it and use it. "Any" anvil is better than no anvil, and I have made lots of things using just a squarish block of unknown steel as an anvil.

 

Really guys, the point is not the tool, the tool is the means to an end. I like good tools as much as any man, trust me, but what he asked is, "will it work" ?

 

The answer is, yes.

Edited by Howard Clark
Link to post
Share on other sites

Patrick, thankyou for the added information. I didn't realize A-36 was an engineering based designation. I thought it was based on content. My bad.

 

 

Howard is absolutely correct in his assesment of the situation. Something to bang on is always better than nothing to bang on> :lol:

 

Daniel Piotte

WAXING MOON FORGE

 

 

The blacksmith and the artist

reflect it in their art

they forge their creativity

closer to the heart.

 

Rush

Link to post
Share on other sites

To my understanding A36 has anywhere from .26% to .36% carbon. If it didn't it wouldn't harden in super quench like 1018. There are several smiths using 1018 block style anvils and I've seen several threads on the subject on other forums. They work fine. The work produced on them is of the finest quality. And the smiths using them are some of the best in the business. If its good enough for the likes of Brian Brazeal its good enough for me. Take a look.

 

http://www.iforgeiron.com/topic/13083-traveling-anvil/

Bryan

 

Virtuite et Armis (Virtue at Arms)

 

http://kbryanforge.wordpress.com/

Link to post
Share on other sites

Everything I need to know I learned from the people trapped in my basement.

 

 

I'm out of my mind but feel free to leave a message.

Link to post
Share on other sites

4140 is a very good anvil material. IF you can get it surface hardened. Actually, it's usually tough enough on its own to use for light-duty pounding. If it's a relatively small chunk you can also oil-quench it and torch temper.

 

My anvil...from all I have researched, is unhardened 4340/4140 (forklift tine). One day I'm going to harden the thing lol...but for now it works pretty well. The first use it was put to was drawing out 1060 rail clips with a 10lb sledge that I cut the handle down on lol.

 

Maybe that work hardened it a bit =D. It still takes dings pretty readily though (I'm a far...far cry from a master with the hammer lol):

 

DSCF2003.jpg

 

Either way it's a great anvil. If you can get one, definately do so.

 

Cris

Slow is smooth, smooth is steady, steady is fast, fast is deadly... Erik R.

http://www.facebook.com/scorpionforge
Link to post
Share on other sites

C Anderson , " 10lb sledge that I cut the handle down on lol. "

We will not be arm wrestling any time soon , LOL !

Forklift tines are pretty high class steel , if you can get your mitts on some , grab it .

Ken Burbank

Link to post
Share on other sites

C Anderson , " 10lb sledge that I cut the handle down on lol. "

We will not be arm wrestling any time soon , LOL !

Forklift tines are pretty high class steel , if you can get your mitts on some , grab it .

 

LOL =D.

 

I drew out three 1060 rail clips into 1" x 1/4"...by hand. It wasn't fun...and I've no intention of doing it again any time soon =D. The $15 I saved over buying the steel already sized wasn't worth the fuel cost, nor the effort lol.

 

DSCF6877.jpg

 

DSCF6878.jpg

 

DSCF6778.jpg

 

DSCF6786.jpg

In the last two pictures you can see I still wasn't finished lol...what a waste of time and effort!

 

Never again willingly lol =D.

 

And yeah...without that forklift tine anvil...I'd never have even tried!

 

Cris

Slow is smooth, smooth is steady, steady is fast, fast is deadly... Erik R.

http://www.facebook.com/scorpionforge
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...