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It has become necessary for me to re-define the scope of my work. Due to space (and living in a city) I won't be doing any large forging for a while. The point is I have a nearly new 335 LB anvil with the shelf on the left like the one pictured at the bottom of the photo in the link provided. I haven't even rounded the corners yet! So you can customize it for yourself.

The price is $500.00, pick up only in Chattanooga, TN USA before July 26, 2004

Thanks, Dennis

http://euroanvils.net/index.php

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  • 12 years later...

Hey Dennis - I know this was posted over a decade ago - but is there any chance that your anvil is still available? I'm trying to enter the hobby of bladesmithing but funds have limited me greatly. I've been shocked at how expensive anvils are - and getting a used one in this price range would be perfect for me.

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Matt, there are various threads here on makeshift anvils, you should explore them. A "traditional" London pattern anvil is not the only way to go, nor is it necessarily the best choice for a bladesmith. This is what we often recommend to guys just starting out. You can get a lot of work done on one for not much up front investment.

 

BTW, if we knew where you were, we might be able to point you toward tools. Unfortunately, this is not a craft you can get into for just a few $, even a basic tool kit is going to cost. Sometimes the blacksmith gods smile, though.

 

Geoff

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Matt, there are various threads here on makeshift anvils, you should explore them. A "traditional" London pattern anvil is not the only way to go, nor is it necessarily the best choice for a bladesmith. This is what we often recommend to guys just starting out. You can get a lot of work done on one for not much up front investment.

 

BTW, if we knew where you were, we might be able to point you toward tools. Unfortunately, this is not a craft you can get into for just a few $, even a basic tool kit is going to cost. Sometimes the blacksmith gods smile, though.

 

Geoff

 

 

Geoff,

 

Thank you- that was very helpful and I will be sure to look into that rather than a london anvil. However, as I said on the other forum, I am having trouble convincing my parents of helping me enter this hobby. Hence, I believe that it may be wise to forge everyday objects other than knives at the very beginning (ex. those hooks for holding bananas, fire pokers, etc.) in order to cast a favorable light upon the hobby. This has led me to believe the horn on a "traditional" anvil to be necessary for other tasks. Are their any other shapes which combine the two types? Also, if I were to save up and purchase a london type, what would you advise? A nimba, a peddinghaus, a euroanvil, or some other company? And lastly, what weight would you recommend?

 

Sincerely,

Matthew

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It depends on what you are doing. More weight is better, but the more mass you have beneath the sweet spot, the more work you can do per strike. If you are able to buy a new anvil, buy the big one. If you are buying a used anvil, then you either buy the one you've found, or you keep looking.

 

If you look at an anvil (and this takes a bit of a practiced eye), it's made up of several different tools. So if you deconstruct it, you've got a block (the center of the anvil above the foot), a horn, a step, and a hardy holder (the heel). You also have various edges and corners.

 

1) The block. This is where you will do most of your forging. Properly heat treated, it returns the most energy to your hammer. The block has 3 edges (on most anvils) or 4 on a true block anvil. Each of these can be radiused to use as different striking surfaces. If one is sharp, it can be used as a cutter.

 

2) The horn, useful for drawing out material and for forming over.

 

3) The step. The step can be used as a bottom fuller, or for forming corners.

 

4) The heel. The heel of an anvil is not the best part to forge on, with no mass below it it sucks the energy out of your stroke. However, it is also where you can put tooling.

 

So you could make an anvil analog with: A block to forge on, a piece of round stock to use as a drawing and forming surface, something to hold hardy tools. Would a built up setup work as well as a "real anvil"? Probably not, would it work for a while? Yes it would.

 

I have a pic of my setup, but I can't lay hands on it just now, and it's could, dark, and raining or I'd run out and get a new pic. It's all built onto a 3x4 piece of 1 inch steel plate. There is a 5x6.5x29 block on end, this is my main anvil. Another block, laid on it side that I use to hold some specialty tools and as a long surface to straighten things on, and a swage block, which I use to hold hardy tools (like a cutoff tool) and other things. I have various pieces of steel that I use as a horn (which I hardly ever need) and for other things.

 

I do have 3 other "real" anvils, a 125# that I use as a demo and traveler, a 200# that I let students use, and a 30# that use as a bench anvil, but my everyday anvil is the block.

 

I have heard that OWA will cut a 4x4x12 block for you. That is what I would buy to start out. A nice heavy block to hold it and you will be able to get started. The more weight the better. My 200# anvil is a much better tool nailed down to 200# of block than it ever was sitting on a stump.

 

Geoff

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Found it

 

IMG_9382 (427x640).jpg

 

The block in the foreground is my main forging surface, the long block is my tooling and straightening surface and the swage block is the thing with all of the holes.

 

There is a hammer rack in teh middle of things and tools and half finished projects take up the space on the top of the plate.

 

g

Edited by Geoff Keyes
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