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Salt Water Etching Tutorial


C.Anderson
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Chris that is a superb tutorial. I also really like the knife design you've gone with. I saw a picture of another knife you made and was wondering how you made the handle for it. Is this something you can share? Thanks in advance.

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Chris that is a superb tutorial. I also really like the knife design you've gone with. I saw a picture of another knife you made and was wondering how you made the handle for it. Is this something you can share? Thanks in advance.

 

Thanks =D. I try to share the things I've picked up any time I can. Without all the help from the generous artists on this board, I'd never have learned what I have so quickly!

 

As for how I made the handle (and the rest of the knife), the build thread is here. If you have any other questions feel free to ask. I don't have as much online access as I used to, but if I can help out I'll certainly try =D.

 

Cris

Slow is smooth, smooth is steady, steady is fast, fast is deadly... Erik R.

http://www.facebook.com/scorpionforge
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I have looked all over, and cannot find a Kinko's or similar place that has a vinyl cutter that will do small work. Smallest letter I've been told is 1 inch. PHooey.

 

Maybe someone here would be willing to order me a few sheets, if I offered to pay and provide the design? Or help put me in touch with a known source I can work with directly?

Christopher,

I just had some done about 3 months ago and Kinkos is no longer called Kinkos.

It is now Fed Ex Office

Maybe this will change the results of your search for a local supplier.

Good luck.

Also I should add that these vinyl stencils work well if your piece is immersed in ferric chloride

Here is a pic of both the electro etch on my plane irons and the FeCl use on the key fob

A great many thanks for the work on this tutorial goes to Chris Anderson

Steve

IMG_4937.JPG

Edited by bronzetools
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Thanks =D. I try to share the things I've picked up any time I can. Without all the help from the generous artists on this board, I'd never have learned what I have so quickly!

 

As for how I made the handle (and the rest of the knife), the build thread is here. If you have any other questions feel free to ask. I don't have as much online access as I used to, but if I can help out I'll certainly try =D.

 

Cris

 

 

Thanks Chris. Another superb tutorial. You do wonderful work and it's nice to see that it's all by hand. Gives inspiration to those of us with a mulititude of power tools.

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Thanks Chris. Another superb tutorial. You do wonderful work and it's nice to see that it's all by hand. Gives inspiration to those of us with a mulititude of power tools.

 

Thanks Jaka! I appreciate the compliment =D. I really do owe it all to the people who came before me on this board though. The hand making it may have been mine, but the inspiration and knowledge (other than common sense lol!) surely came from others =D.

 

That knife is used every day of its life by the way, in a myriad of ways lol (even as a can opener =X)...and is a joy. I'm very proud of it. It has wore in beautifully I think. Here's a couple pictures of its current state (sorry for the hijack!):

 

IMAG0291.jpg

IMAG0293.jpg

 

=D.

 

Also...Chris...did the calls I made help you out at all? They never followed up with me but hopefully it got worked out and you got your stencils!

 

Cris

Slow is smooth, smooth is steady, steady is fast, fast is deadly... Erik R.

http://www.facebook.com/scorpionforge
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  • 9 months later...

I have had better luck with a clean power source like a 6 volt power supply from a computer. The lower voltage and lower amps seem to make a clean, crisp line. I have used a wax mixture of bees wax and paraffin as a resist, but I really want to try shellac with a little color added to it. The vinyl template looks like another great way for repeatability of a touch mark. Wayne Goddard has this process in his second edition of "Wonders of Knifemaking" using wax as a resist.

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I'm glad this thread popped back up.

 

Thanks for posting this Cris. I've used it a couple times and it's worked like a charm.

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Also...Chris...did the calls I made help you out at all? They never followed up with me but hopefully it got worked out and you got your stencils!

 

Cris

 

Totally missed this - but yes, the lady I ended up working with was very helpful. We had a slight mis-communication on one item, that she though I wanted her to pick out the negative space on my stencils, all 2 gross of 'em. I was wondering why I hadn't heard back a week after the cutting had been done, and once I realized what she was spending time on, I told her to abandon that ship immediately, that I could take care of that myself, and my work arrived a couple days later.

 

The lady who helped me left that office shortly after, but I have her contact info at her new store in case I need her again. I don't make enough knives to burn through my supply anytime soon, but if anyone else is looking to order, I can dig it up.

The Tidewater Forge

Christopher Price, Bladesmith

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  • 1 month later...

Thank everyone for offering this tutorial. I worked with a local Kinkos/FedEx and found a design I was satisfied with. They gave me a couple of samples to test and I tried them on 1095 and an alloy piece of lawn mower blade. They both cut well using a battery charger and this well outlined method but I added ferric cloride etchant and I only went 6 volts as others have stated. So pretty pleased, I tried two more samples on 1084 and I turned the current to "cranking" power. I did not get near the "bite" as before with 6 volts. as a matter of fact the mark looks superficial.

So I wondered why or what others may have experienced? Also, has anyone tried to etch amy of the stainless steels with success?

Thank you.

"I Never Met A Knife I Didn't Like", (Will Rogers)

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  • 1 month later...

This is one slick Tutorial. Thanks so much for the info. Haven't found anyone who will cut out stencils that small but I have had decent luck with using 2" wide electrical tape and an Exacto knife to make a stencil. Works fine but I still want to find stencils so my mark looks the same every time. I have been practicing this on some BS steel but I am about ready to take the plunge and try it on a blade.

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  • 1 month later...

Thank you,

 

That was great info.

"Old dogs care about you even when you make mistakes" - Tom HALL - Old Dogs, Children and Watermelon wine.

 

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great tutorial... I've used something like this on and off for a couple of years now. one recommendation would be to use a brass bar with your terminal soldered on to it and use small pieces of felt instead of cue tips. The stray strands from the cuetips can supposedly get under your stencil.

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I wasn't sure where to put this...but since it's really one of the last steps you will take when making a blade, I decided this would be a good place. Mods please feel free to move it if it should in fact have been posted elsewhere!

 

If you have any questions or need clarification, please ask. It is a simple process but since I already know how to do it...there may be things I don't think to show that aren't immediately apparent! It's pretty self explanatory from the pictures though.

 

C[/i]

 

Chris,

 

Thank you for a very clear well done tutorial.

Jan

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  • 3 weeks later...

Thank you for the very well done tutorial.. I read something like this in one of Wayne Goddards books but I understood yours much much easier .. I can't wait to try this, I have a logo in my head I just hope that it works .. thanks again

Thanks Glendon

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  • 4 months later...

I've tried to make this process work for me time and time again. I think it's awesome and appears to yeild good results but I just can't seem to get it right. I think it might be my battery charger. It's a Schumacher SE1275a fully automatic 75 amp charger when I plug it in the "power on" light comes on and it hums but I get nothing when I connect it to the knife. If anyone has any suggestions I'd greatly appreciate it. Thanks y'all!

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Colton, some battery chargers will not work if they don't "see" something to charge like a battery. I found that while trying to charge a very dead battery and had to hook a good battery to the dead one and charge them both at the same time.

I have been having great success using a 4.5 V charger from an old dead calculator. I cut off the low volt plug and crimped on alligator clips. It only takes 2-3 minutes to etch a logo. I have been using fingernail polish for a resist, but you have to engrave the logo in the polish while it's still tacky. It chips and peels when I try cutting the design after it's dry.

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I appreciate the answer Mike. In all honesty, I kind of figured that was the case and thought that would be the case with all "Fully Automatic" chargers. That is probably why the picture of his charger threw me off. I'm to the point that I'm gonna try to make my own touchmark, if that doesn't work out well I'll try out your idea.

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I've had good luck with a 12V tractor or truck battery.

 

Use with extreme caution though. If you go metal-to-metal it will light up your world.

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  • 1 year later...

Strange that I didn't get notification of these replies!

 

I'm really glad that this was able to help some of you guys out. I also think that my charger got left out in the rain a number of times before I picked it up (it was outdoors at my dad's house). It only works at all on one setting, and that's the 50amp one. It makes a bit of a racket while doing so as well, lol. I've been meaning to pick up something else...I just haven't gotten around to it yet, as this still does work very well.

 

Makes me a little nervous though...every time I use it, lol.

 

For those of you having issues with car battery chargers like mine, I've heard of guys using 9v batteries, and even lantern batteries. Car batteries, motorcycle batteries, pretty much anything with a charge should work to one degree or another. Most things that charge batteries can be converted as well. When I was in Nevada for awhile I used a motorcycle trickle charger without issue, lol.

 

Anyway, like I said, I'm really glad it's working for you guys :).

Slow is smooth, smooth is steady, steady is fast, fast is deadly... Erik R.

http://www.facebook.com/scorpionforge
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Chris,

 

Did you provide the Kinko store an actual size stencil to start with, or could one make a 4" by 4" original and have them resize to one inch square stickers? Forgive me if that has already ben answered ( I could not find it).

 

Jan

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Hello Jan!

 

I supplied them with a digital image. They made a vector graphic out of it which can be scaled up or down pretty much infinitely. If you can get a clean image for them, they'll tell you what they can do with it.

Slow is smooth, smooth is steady, steady is fast, fast is deadly... Erik R.

http://www.facebook.com/scorpionforge
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  • 1 month later...
  • 8 months later...

Credit for this addition goes to Geko, who posted a topic recently regarding two beautiful kiridashi!

 

You can find the topic here:

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=31895#entry308500

 

And here is his post regarding laser printing your stencils!

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

hey guys,

i made a little video about it for you . its really no big deal. and you can transfer nearly everything with it that you can print on paper.

 

1.
to transfer a logo to a knifeblade you need a laser printer!
inkjet dont work for this!
and not every paper works. try different typ of paper.
best results for me was with very thin and shiny paper from this book.

2.
just place the logo on the blade and use some aceton with good pressure. watch out to dont let the paper move. (it has to be as wet as possible) than just let it dry for a minute.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

3.
remove the paper very carefully with clear water. all parts of the logo have to be clean and free from paper.

4.
cover the parts of the blade that you dont wont to etch with some tape.

5.
etch with saltwater.
(search on youtube for videos about it, there are enough)

6.
clean up with aceton.

 

 

 

 

 

maybe i should post this in the "fit and finish" too?

 

 

have a nice day,

geko

 

Slow is smooth, smooth is steady, steady is fast, fast is deadly... Erik R.

http://www.facebook.com/scorpionforge
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