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Pattern Welded Fauxpas


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In preparation for a chef's knife, I was making my fist high-contrast pattern welded steel. The billet started out with 8 layers of alternating 1095 and 15n20. After many hours of forge welding, the billet ended up with 256 layers before twisting. The aim was a "Chevron" style pattern. So, after twisting for about 12 times, I folded the billet against itself. The theory was that the twist was going one way and folding part of it back would make it go the other way. I still don't get why it does not work that way. Isn't the difference between twisted clock-wise and twisted counter-clock wise just flipping the bars around?

 

Anyway, I was out of gas and did a quick edge to see how the pattern looks like.

 

PatternWelded.jpg

PatternWelded (1).jpg

 

Oh well.

 

Niels.

 

Ps: I was going to look at JPH's pattern welded book this morning but since I was running behind I decided not to :-)

Edited by nprovos
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ah... of all the surprises that happen when welding...i think that one ain't to bad at all ;)

 

welds look good.... now.... thinking .... thinking.....

 

ah... its a barber shop poll pattern.. ;)

 

 

 

 

 

but if you feel like riskin it..... you could cut it in half... book match it... then weld it up for some magnum chevrons... oh ya

 

 

Greg

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Cutting and turning it will not give him chevrons, no matter how he tries it. You have to have one rod twisted right, and another twisted left. Unless they intersect at right angles, like a cross guard and blade, then they will run the same direction visually if the two bars are twisted in opposite directions. Twist are fun. Make more. :)

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Cutting and turning it will not give him chevrons, no matter how he tries it. You have to have one rod twisted right, and another twisted left. Unless they intersect at right angles, like a cross guard and blade, then they will run the same direction visually if the two bars are twisted in opposite directions. Twist are fun. Make more. :)

 

If you have a bandsaw you could split along the "spine", bookmatch the halves and end up with a chevron...not sure if thats worth the trouble though.

 

...oops, I see Greg had suggested it already :)

Edited by P.Abrera
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twisting is kinda fun ..

but yes ... i have a large nut and bolt that sits around my press ... to remind me that its not just turning it around the other way that changes the direction of twist.

 

and as soon as ive twisted up and am about to start on the next billet ... i mark the one ive just finished!.

im only just getting back into damascus, and already ive ended up forgetting which way was which ..

 

im gonna start colour coding everything soon...

tehehe

^_^

 

btw guys .. thats for the term 'book matching' .. learned something new today.

:)

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Book matching is a term also used in woodworking.

It describes turning a board on it's edge and ripping it along it's length (cutting from end to end).

When the cut is finished the board is opened like a book , revealing an equal but opposite pattern.

Its just like putting a mirror up against the side of the board to reflect the pattern and some people do just that to see about what they will get after the cut.

I have just been bitten by the damascus bug and have been noticing the similarities between some pattern development and the craft of wood veneering.

Seem everything shares some connection however large or small.

Good Luck

Steve

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