Jump to content
C.Anderson

First Kitchen Knife WIP

Recommended Posts

So, first the backstory:

 

Yesterday was a really nice day out...great cloudcover, a nice breeze through the work space...and since I'm waiting on sand paper to be delivered so I can finish Shoboshi's EDC#3-3...I thought I'd do some forging. It all started well enough...I got the rough form for Wes' EDC#3-4 worked out (still needs refined), which is when the wife came out and asked if I was ever going to make the kitchen knife I'd promised her when we moved to this place. I'd had an idea for a nice kitchen knife swimming around in my head for a couple weeks anyway, so yesterday became the day to start it. Things were going really well...everything was forging out nicely and I had only about half an hours worth of forge work remaining when things got bloody lol. This is what the blade looked like two hours after I stopped working on it. You know...once I got my face, and all the blood cleaned up and went out to snap a picture lol:

 

DSCF2880.jpg

 

Really annoying to have to stop before the blade was forged out lol...but that's life. After 20 minutes or so this morning...this is what we had:

 

 

And...here are the results of a couple hours work getting things shaped up. All that's left is to bring the blade flats down to meet the edge (you can see the bevels I used to set the edge thickness). This will thin the spine even more in the process.

 

DSCF2883.jpg

Here we have the blade after using an angle grinder to clean up the scale. I didn't feel like waiting for the thing to clean up in vinegar for 10 hours lol.

 

DSCF2886.jpg

 

DSCF2884.jpg

A couple passes on the belt sander to see just how badly I dinged it up with the hammer...not too rough!

 

DSCF2890.jpg

 

DSCF2888.jpg

Here is how it sits now. I need to pick up a couple more 36 grit belts to finish things out...then it's normalize and heat treat =D.

 

So...after this...I may drill some holes in the blade about half an inch up or so to keep things from sticking to it. Either way it will of course be differentially hardened lol. Debating on what quench medium to use...but I'll probably do brine again with an interrupted quench. This has a much thinner cross section than the knives I've been doing, and a MUCH thinner cross section than my swords...so I hope I don't get a ton of warpage.

 

Anyway...more updates as things unfold =D.

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ouch!

 

May I suggest the tongs of Grant Sarver (Off Center Tools) to you? More expensive than vice-grips but, worth every penny. Bladesmiths Tongs

 

~Bruce~

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I definately need some tongs lol. My big problem is every time I go to look...there's so many options and none will quite do all the things I need (within reason of course)...so I look and look and can't decide on one and end up not getting any lol. I understand you need more than one pair for more than one job lol...but I need something at least general purpose enough to get by with. I can't afford five (or even two) pairs of tongs right now lol.

 

Anyhow though...here is how things sit right now:

 

DSCF2893.jpg

 

DSCF2894.jpg

Couple profile pictures (dunno what's up with the yellow one?). For comparison is my 'Good Cook' 7" Santoku lol. It's been a surprisingly decent knife...once I put a real edge on it.

 

DSCF2898.jpg

 

DSCF2897.jpg

 

DSCF2896.jpg

Edge and spine. The spine is still a little thick for my preferance. If it doesn't cut how I want it to...I'll set a workrest up on my sander/grinder, and put a 90* grind on it until it's as thin as I want...and then blend it into the edge with the slack belt. I'm working with a 1x30 belt sander here...so I'm sort of limited. There's still more to take off the flats though (as you can see by the small edge bevels I made to set my edge thickness)...so it may turn out ok without it.

 

DSCF2904.jpg

 

DSCF2903.jpg

 

DSCF2902.jpg

 

DSCF2901.jpg

 

DSCF2900.jpg

 

DSCF2899.jpg

Some general angle shots. I've never made anything this 'thin' before, and it's kind of cool to see it turning out. Much better than I expected anyhow lol.

 

So there it is. I'm pretty pleased to be honest. I'm not sure how exactly I'm going to handle it. I picked up some nice stabalized woods on Ebay recently...and am thinking I might be able to make something cool work with them.

 

The options are:

 

BzRSgDBGkKGrHqIOKjwEwrQL-E1BMVIIDkbg_12.jpg

Ramon Stump

 

Bpj77UCGkKGrHqMH-CcEuYywco3jBLr6peEDwg_12.jpg

Spalted Cottonwood

 

BiMyqQ2kKGrHqUH-DEEslhswUOSBLNpBtYC_12.jpg

Zircote

 

BcBzb1gmkKGrHqQH-EEque2ByyhBKyrzlSRg_12.jpg

Maple Soft Ambrosia

 

The wife is partial to the Zircote...but we'll have to see how it matches with the blade finish =D.

 

Cris

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DUDE

 

you have the same tastes in handle material as I do!

I love bold dark lines and simple figure.. spalt is awesome.

 

Oh, and I have one pair of tongs :) They do basically everything for me.. I could send you a pic or a pair :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DUDE

 

you have the same tastes in handle material as I do!

I love bold dark lines and simple figure.. spalt is awesome.

 

Oh, and I have one pair of tongs smile.gif They do basically everything for me.. I could send you a pic or a pair smile.gif

 

LOL it seems we have the same or similar tastes in just about everything lol.

 

For me...I like dramatic coloring in woods...I mean heavily figured wood is cool, but even with those my favorites have heavy color differences with very sharp contrast. California Buckeye Burl (second from the left is nice), Amboyna Burl (when you get both the red and white wood together like in the bottom right of the link...wow), and the like. Anything spalted flat rocks. Now it just remains to be seen if I can do them any justice lol. I have one VERY cool idea...but it's going to take some doing to pull off, and I don't know if I have the tools or knowledge lol.

 

I guess we shall see =D! That's kind of what I thought about bladesmithing too lol.

 

On the tongs...PM sent brother!

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love Amboyna :D

 

one wood I'm starting to like is redwood burl.. Its so different from anything else, the only thing is I really like the trees, and would feel evil using the wood for anything :P

 

goofy I know.. ah well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah...all of the burls are pretty nice...but again, I REALLY like the multi color stuff...all the dramatic impact of spalted wood, but with the beauty of a burl.

 

Really cool =D.

 

As for this blade...let me think out loud for a second...

 

First...I'm going to round the spine and grip like my little user knives:

 

DSCF2751.jpg

 

This is actually why I left the spine along the handle so thick. Makes kind of a tradeoff on spine thickness through the blade though...but I'll be working on that.

 

Next...we'll polish the entire blade to 2000 grit, then etch repeatedly in 4:1 ferric chloride/water. In between etches, I'm going to polish the blade with Barkeeper's Friend...this leaves a lighter grey and seemingly durable patina on the blade, while showing all the features of the hamon in shades of charcoal. Really cool effect. Repeat until the etch doesn't darken things anymore...or, I've reached a color I like.

 

Then, I'll go back with like 2000 grit, or possibly even a buffing wheel...and polish out ONLY the rounded spine and grip for contrast....

 

After that...it's time for the handle....

 

Handle.jpg

 

You'll have to excuse my preschool photo editing here lol...I'm using a free program since my old PS7 got lost with the old hard drive =/. It's a rough representation though. The rounded edges will help with comfort and grip, while the minimalist scales (they'll taper from thicker in the front, to thinner in the rear...to compensate for the distal taper in the blade) will help with blade indexing and overall security.

 

Hmm....

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that is a very nice looking knife... very nouveau kitchen styly ;)

 

 

 

err, about the tong or lack of tong

 

typically, you shouldn't use a flat tong with the bit perpendicular to the anvil... generally try to keep the bit, parallel to the anvil face and the work will not want to flip up into your face if its not flat on the anvil..... ( only move side to side )

 

a good sorta rule is to alway use 3 points of contact with a tong... those really trap the stock so you can forge better and safer ( quality of forging goes up)

 

tongs are the some of the cheepest things in the shop...i haven't spent a dime on it other than fuel to make it... you could buy the round stock iron for very little... or you can do as i did and dumpster dive for transport truck U bolts that hold the spring packs... thats a steel

- i'm not knockin those super blade smith tongs... they're bout the best, just pricey for a cheepo like me :(

 

here is one of my fav tong vid's for inspiration

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmQTOTIKcWg

 

sorry for the tong talk but you do nice work and its a shame to be fighting away with a pair of pliers when you could be finessing the steel with some hammer blows ;)

 

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that is a very nice looking knife... very nouveau kitchen styly wink.gif

 

 

 

err, about the tong or lack of tong

 

typically, you shouldn't use a flat tong with the bit perpendicular to the anvil... generally try to keep the bit, parallel to the anvil face and the work will not want to flip up into your face if its not flat on the anvil..... ( only move side to side )

 

a good sorta rule is to alway use 3 points of contact with a tong... those really trap the stock so you can forge better and safer ( quality of forging goes up)

 

tongs are the some of the cheepest things in the shop...i haven't spent a dime on it other than fuel to make it... you could buy the round stock iron for very little... or you can do as i did and dumpster dive for transport truck U bolts that hold the spring packs... thats a steel

- i'm not knockin those super blade smith tongs... they're bout the best, just pricey for a cheepo like me sad.gif

 

here is one of my fav tong vid's for inspiration

http://www.youtube.c...h?v=VmQTOTIKcWg

 

sorry for the tong talk but you do nice work and its a shame to be fighting away with a pair of pliers when you could be finessing the steel with some hammer blows wink.gif

 

 

Greg

 

Thanks Greg =D. I've seen that one before...and thought a hundred times about making some. I don't have a proper horn at the moment...and I think it'd be pretty useful for tong making lol.

 

I'm actually hoping to pick up a pair from Kenon shortly here. I like both my eyes, and don't need any more scars to pretty up my face lol.

 

 

As for the knife...here's a couple more pictures now that the flats are finished up. I'm about to go ahead and round the spine and grip.

 

As it sits, the spine 7" from the tip is .150", spine at the butt is .200", and 3" from the tip it's .110". Overall length is 12 1/4", and the cutting edge is exactly 7" long.

 

DSCF2914.jpg

 

DSCF2913.jpg

 

DSCF2912.jpg

 

DSCF2911.jpg

 

DSCF2910.jpg

 

DSCF2909.jpg

 

DSCF2908.jpg

 

DSCF2907.jpg

 

DSCF2906.jpg

 

More pictures later =D.

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wanna know the definition of 'bittersweet'??

 

DSCF2945.jpg

 

DSCF2944.jpg

 

DSCF2943.jpg

 

DSCF2942.jpg

 

DSCF2941.jpg

 

And the clay application that created it.

 

DSCF2940.jpg

 

DSCF2939.jpg

 

The edge was just too damn thin after breaking it down to get the last hamon to show. I knew it too...but there was no way I was leaving that ugly hamon on it from the first attempt. Ahh well...I may sharpen it up and polish it out anyhow. It'll still cut...I'll just make sure not to use it on meat. Plus that beautiful hamon will be a reminder of what's possible with a bit of application =D. There's SO much more activity waiting in there with more polish. If you look at the last two pictures of the blade...the only difference is one side is 120grit horizontal, the other 120 grit vertical from the sander. This thing at 1000+ and a good etch is going to be incredible.

 

Just gotta keep the edge thicker lol. Ahh well. It's only steel. Well, that...and blood and sweat lol!

 

Cris

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks awesome!

 

However, you need to learn how to modify tongs, as not one pair will ever do everything you want to do, we are manipulators of metal you know. :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ouch!!!!!! that hadda hurt... next time... a much longer soak time at critical.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks awesome!

 

However, you need to learn how to modify tongs, as not one pair will ever do everything you want to do, we are manipulators of metal you know. tongue.gif

 

Yes sir! I'm still getting used to the fact that I should be able to make things other than knives with the forge lol. I guess I kinda came at this backwards. A couple knives, swords, more knives...then tools?

 

=D

 

Ouch!!!!!! that hadda hurt... next time... a much longer soak time at critical.

 

Yeah...it stings a lil lol. Worst part was...all the cracks happened outside the quenchant. In for 1...2...3....4...all good!...out for 1...2....TING!...TINGTINGTING!!....TING!!! The odd thing is that the feeling was EXACTLY the same as when it put the hole in my face lol. Split second shock...then a dull ache...and a resigned realization as you put your tools away that what's done is done...time now to see how bad the damage is lol. This time there was less blood though =p

 

Like I said though...I think the edge was just too thin. It could be that I had too wide a hamon as well. All that martensite pulling on the thin edge. I'd have been smarter, knowing the edge was thin...to bring the hamon down around 3/8" from the edge all the way through. Might have been pretty a spectacular look too with that neat habuchi...and probably wouldn't have cracked as easily.

 

Ahh well, I have more steel, plenty of propane...and a will =D. I'll make another one soon enough!

 

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wholly smokes, was that an oil quench?

 

 

No sir =D.

 

It was...about 5gal of 120F water, salt...and a dash of dish soap lol. Same thing I use to quench every single thing I've ever made from day one lol.

 

I was due for a crack or two...getting 5 out of this one hopefully will use up my quota for the next 10 or so blades =D.

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well...

 

It makes for a really narrow blade....but I think cutting it down past the cracks is doable. Later I can make a couple matches, one 7" and one Chef's blade. On this one I lose an inch of cutting edge...leaving it 6", and a half inch or better in width, leaving it 1 1/4" at the widest point of the blade.

 

DSCF2986.jpg

 

Not too bad...lets just cross our fingers it survives THIS heat treat lol =D. Still need to make a tracing so I can start building a pattern for these things. I'm really happy with the overall look of them.

 

Cris

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looked to me, judging fromt he pictures, that you may have enough beef in the remaining blade to forge it out some more and give yourself back some of your width. Dunno, though. Good luck. It was looking good up until the cracks. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looked to me, judging fromt he pictures, that you may have enough beef in the remaining blade to forge it out some more and give yourself back some of your width. Dunno, though. Good luck. It was looking good up until the cracks. smile.gif

 

 

Thanks =D. When I read this I thought that might be the case too. With it in hand though...it'd be a really close thing.

 

I think I'm going to see about trimming it tomorrow. It's been suggested that I just make a new one (by someone I highly respect)...but I'd like to learn what there is to be learned from this one.

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OUCH! im sorry

 

 

Thanks Jared lol...I'm over it I think. Well...it's still sitting in front of me on my monitor stand...so maybe not as over it as I thought =p. The part of it that really stung was that beautiful triple hamon being lost lol.

 

If the cracks come out like I'm hoping though...it'll still be a useful slicer in the kitchen. Just less of an 'all purpose' knife. Better for prepping fruits and veggies.

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing you need to consider, the geometry difference between the production knife you posed next to yours.In the real world of the proffessional kitchen there is boning cleavers that are thinner than your knife. Kitchen folk are VERY serious knife nuts alot of the time, they are in worlds of thin not many knifemakers can comprehend!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing you need to consider, the geometry difference between the production knife you posed next to yours.In the real world of the proffessional kitchen there is boning cleavers that are thinner than your knife. Kitchen folk are VERY serious knife nuts alot of the time, they are in worlds of thin not many knifemakers can comprehend!

 

Hey Sam =D!

 

Thanks for the comment/advice. I knew it was probably too thick from about 3" up the blade from the tip...all the way back to the heel lol. This one being for home use (my home lol)...it wasn't worth chewing through another three or more 36 grit belts to bring it all down though (the little 1x30 belts don't last long...lol). I don't ever personally cut anything where 1/16" more thickness would be an issue.

 

Good to hear from you though bud...and thanks again =D.

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the shape of that knife, being a Chef im telling you, that thick back spine is awesome it totaly saves your hand after a long day. I used to use a Global and after a month or so I chucked it and picked up a old french chefs knife the back spine is like 7mm tapered to 3mm about 2" past the handel I rounded the edges and its a dream.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love the shape of that knife, being a Chef im telling you, that thick back spine is awesome it totaly saves your hand after a long day. I used to use a Global and after a month or so I chucked it and picked up a old french chefs knife the back spine is like 7mm tapered to 3mm about 2" past the handel I rounded the edges and its a dream.

 

Wow that's very cool =D.

 

I haven't had the chance to get the input from any actual professionals...though I very much would love to. I...like Sam, thought that as thin as possible would be absolutely critical. Mine is about 5mm at the butt, tapering to 3mm 2" from the handle, and 2mm an inch from the tip. Nice to know that it actually wasn't too far off what a chef would like to use =D.

 

Cris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...