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Colin KC

Transporting a blade

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I'm not sure about wakizashi's in particular, but when I need to transport a blade without a sheath or outside of its sheath, I whip up a quick cardboard sheath with one or two layers of cardboard then a whole wrap of duct tape around it. This has worked for me with even pretty curved or odd-shaped blades. The blade will poke through the cardboard eventually (with some pressure) but it has always lasted long enough for me for shipping or other transport. If you're woried about poking through, you could consider reinforcing the sheath with either more cardboard/duct tape or some broken pieces of hard plastic (such as from those dividers you find in 3-ring notebooks, those have worked great for me), all wrapped in duct tape. If the cardboard (for some reason) is roughed up and you find that it can scratch a really high polish (never happened to me, but maybe it's possible), you could consider wrapping the blade in cloth or something then putting it in the cardboard. That would also reinforce the strength of the sheath.

 

After the cardboard sheath, I usually package the blade in a somewhat oversized box that I have stuffed very tightly with newspaper or packing paper. The blade usually rests diagonally on the box, with paper stuffed on all ends of the knife.

 

That works for me. Hope it helps!

 

-Dan

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Colin,

 

Like Dan said, you'll have to build a special box to transport it safely. I have some large pieces of high-density foam that I will use for the nakago-jiri and kissaki to keep them from poking through.

 

To avoid rust, first clean the blade thoroughly, then oil the blade really well. Swath the blade in either very clean, disposable linen, or even white paper towels. I have some nice, acid-free paper that I use after oiling the blade thoroughly. Parchment for baking should work, too.

 

I cut a small slit in two pieces of the foam that is already cut to fit the box I am using (or mailing tube, sometimes). This "suspends" the blade within the box, being held only at the ends w/ the foam. Then I make sure the blade is supported w/ packing peanuts or bubble-wrap in this modified "suspension" rigged container, to discourage any shifting of the blade during transit.

 

And remember, it may be postal law to write on the box the contents or post that it is potentially dangerous. Regardless of where I am shipping my blades, I always will write "FRAGILE" all OVER the box in hopes that it will be treated with more respect and decrease any chances that anyone will do something stupid with the package and potentially get hurt.

 

Good luck!

 

Shannon

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If there is not too much curve to it, you could do something I saw Alan mention before which was a piece of PVC pipe with wood plugs screwed into end.

Could also make a little plywood create box lined with foam.

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If there is not too much curve to it, you could do something I saw Alan mention before which was a piece of PVC pipe with wood plugs screwed into end.

Could also make a little plywood create box lined with foam.

 

The blades I've sent...this is what I do...but I go ahead and use PVC caps and place a couple screws to hold them on. Even substantially curved blades can be shipped this way with 2" pvc...and if for some reason the curvature was larger than 2" overall, you could use a heat gun to soften the pvc enough to banana it.

 

Shannon's foam is a great idea as well...and would fit within the pvc idea also.

 

Cris

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i like 1/4" cardboard packing tube and bubble wrap with a cheap towel wrapped around the blade - it would require a fairly massive force to break it.

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I have had blades shipped to me pierce the shipping boxes no matter how well wrapped or secured with bubble pack or how stout the shipping containers. I have had more than one of the blades I shipped off end up arriving with their points sticking out thru the end of the box.

 

My solution has always been to get a 1/4" board and run a screw thru the mekugi ana with a rubber washer on it into the board and then box the board in a shipping container. If they are polished then they need to be wrapped to protect the finish. This is the only way I have been able to consistently ship long blades without damage to the carrier or the blade. I did sucessfully ship some long blades that had been wrapped in that tool box liners super rubber stuff that they use for pads to open jar lids. It really sticks to the blade and is rubbery enough that if you wrap the blade and then secure it with a tight couple of cable ties it can't slide when the box is dropped on it's nose.

 

Finished swords are always shipped in the saya/scabbard and wrapped in shock absorbent material and then locked in a plastic gun case Secured with cable ties.

 

At one point I was actually including a top of the line Pelican case with every blade I sold and shipped as it was a classy way to protect an expensive investment and provided a lifetime home for it.

 

Brian

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Thanks guys.

 

Blimey! Looks like a right minefield :rolleyes:

 

I think that favourite would be to drive them there methinks, safer all round ;)

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At one point I was actually including a top of the line Pelican case with every blade I sold and shipped as it was a classy way to protect an expensive investment and provided a lifetime home for it.

 

 

I like this Brian =D.

 

Good to see you 'round here brother!

 

Cris

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