Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Just finished up a five month video-filming project and a very large, complicated katana more or less at the same time and I felt like a weight was lifted off my shoulders...so I decided to just screw around and have some fun on an uncommissioned piece. This tanto is the result.

 

It's around 1200 layers of 1095/1050. The layering is actually a little more subtle in real life than it is in the photo. Otherwise nothing unusual about it. Pretty much my normal style: lots of curvature, choji hamon. Blade length is right at 10 inches.

 

new weld tech omote.jpg

 

new weld tech ura.jpg

 

new weld tech hamon1.jpg

 

new weld tech hamon3.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh my lord! That blade is just gorgeous. I am so envious of your work. The contrast is striking! Very nice.

 

Where can I learn how to heat treat/polish like that? I'm trying to muddle through it....but I don't feel like I'm moving forward.

Edited by David M
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! To answer your question (at the risk of sounding like I'm flogging my videos!), I made all of my instructional vids specifically so that people can cut the learning curve on this stuff. Back when I got started there was just nothing out there and I had to do a ton of muddling. Once I finally muddled my way to a modest level of competence, I used to get emails all the time from people saying, "How do you do your hamons?" After giving the same long, time-consuming (and probably completely unsatisfactory) answer to lots of people, I finally decided to do a little video that showed my techniques. Then once I started the video, I said to myself, "Okay, if I was buying this video X number of years ago, what would I have wanted to be on it?" And then I set out to make exactly that video, no holds barred. I know it sounds like a self-serving answer, but honestly my videos are pretty much a straight-up brain dump of most everything I know about making this kind of blade.

 

 

Oh my lord! That blade is just gorgeous. I am so envious of your work. The contrast is striking! Very nice.

 

Where can I learn how to heat treat/polish like that? I'm trying to muddle through it....but I don't feel like I'm moving forward.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks! To answer your question (at the risk of sounding like I'm flogging my videos!), I made all of my instructional vids specifically so that people can cut the learning curve on this stuff. Back when I got started there was just nothing out there and I had to do a ton of muddling. Once I finally muddled my way to a modest level of competence, I used to get emails all the time from people saying, "How do you do your hamons?" After giving the same long, time-consuming (and probably completely unsatisfactory) answer to lots of people, I finally decided to do a little video that showed my techniques. Then once I started the video, I said to myself, "Okay, if I was buying this video X number of years ago, what would I have wanted to be on it?" And then I set out to make exactly that video, no holds barred. I know it sounds like a self-serving answer, but honestly my videos are pretty much a straight-up brain dump of most everything I know about making this kind of blade.

 

 

 

 

Well then. I know where I'm going to be spending money soon. Thanks alot!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr. Sorrells:

 

I can not, for the life of me figure out why your welds/hada are a different color than mine and I am using the same materials..Do you mind if I ask if you are welding in coal, charcoal or gas?

 

I am starting to think that this last batch of 1095 I got had a bit more Mn in it than I was told...

 

Beautiful little blade....

 

JPH

Link to post
Share on other sites

Walter I feel that I am very close to being able to forge weld my own steel and possibly have a Wakizashi length blade from it. And I hope mine turn out as nice as yours.

Link to post
Share on other sites

if some one swings this at you and the blade doesn't hit you the hammon will still knock you out lol. beautiful work

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, you have to bear in mind that photography plays a big part. It's not that there's trick photography or photoshopping involved or anything. It's just that I spent a fair amount of time figuring out how to photograph this stuff so that you could see all the features really clearly. Honestly you actually won't see this much detail with the naked eye. I mean, there's nothing in the picture that you can't see when you're looking at it in favorable light. But it's just not quite this stark.

 

Anyway, to answer your question, I weld in a gas forge using borax flux. Nothing unusual. I did spend a lot of time on the etch/polish phase, too. The hamon popped out quite quickly, but the details of the hada in the ji took a fair amount of etching to bring out. Also I think that polishing with loose abrasives helps. I'm not sure about this, but I think that loose abrasives (I used 3 micron AO and oil, rubbed up the blade with a paper towel), help dig into the softer steel at the weld borders.

 

But it's all a work in progress!

 

 

 

Mr. Sorrells:

 

I can not, for the life of me figure out why your welds/hada are a different color than mine and I am using the same materials..Do you mind if I ask if you are welding in coal, charcoal or gas?

 

I am starting to think that this last batch of 1095 I got had a bit more Mn in it than I was told...

 

Beautiful little blade....

 

JPH

Link to post
Share on other sites

F.Y.I. Walters Videos are worth it. They can cut through a lot of Screw ups.. up front. Honestly there are other bladesmiths that don't seem to want to take the time to communicate any helpful hints or take time to "teach" the general collective wannabe's (like me), even though they obviously have a love for the art, they protect their experience with lock and key?? Walters videos are wellll worth it.

 

Great looking piece Walter, glad to see you put out a piece for fun.

 

Scott

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...