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What kind of forge did they use in the old west?huh.gif

 

‎"We all want progress, but if you're on the wrong road, progress means doing an about-turn and walking back to the right road; in that case, the man who turns back soonest is the most progressive.” - C.S. Lewis

 

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What part of the Old West? Minnesota, Kansas? Much of what we think of as the "Old West" took place in that part of the country. The largest organized bank raid was at Northfield Mn.

 

Coal was used where it could be had, charcoal was used, I suspect that wood was used in places. The first gas forges go back to the 1830's (?. Need a reference here) and the Pennsylvania oil strikes. I have seen film of African forges being run on animal dung. If it will burn, people have used it.

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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I"m doing a western day with a friend for his church. I was wondering what kind of portable forge I could use? I have 20 pounds charcoal already, so I want to that. I guess it does't matter what kind of old west or when. Just something that would be a fair representation of the times.

 

‎"We all want progress, but if you're on the wrong road, progress means doing an about-turn and walking back to the right road; in that case, the man who turns back soonest is the most progressive.” - C.S. Lewis

 

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It the local big musuem they had blacksmith setup late 1850 or so I forgot to bring the cam but it was a wood box about 20 by 20 bottom blast claylined , is had round double stacked round bellows about the size or around of a 5 gallon bucket.

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I"m doing a western day with a friend for his church. I was wondering what kind of portable forge I could use? I have 20 pounds charcoal already, so I want to that. I guess it does't matter what kind of old west or when. Just something that would be a fair representation of the times.

 

Again, it DOES matter what kind of old west or when. Where I live, we were the western frontier between around 1760-1790, and were referred to as the "old west" in writing until the 1890s. Where Geoff lives they were the western frontier from around 1806-1890. A LOT of stuff happened during that time, and some folks don't consider either East Tennessee or Washington to be in any way "old west."

 

James' advice isn't bad, a clay-lined wooden box was fairly normal for an expedient (portable is not really the word you're looking for until after 1875 or so) forge. Bellows are fine no matter what, hand crank blowers start to show up after about 1880 or so, depending on how close to a railroad you live. Cast iron bottom-blast firepots are of the same period. Side-blown and bottom-blown charcoal forges made from a box of clay are fine mid-1800s things. Entire cast iron or stamped steel forges in the U.S. generally don't show up until the 1880s and later, especially the further you get from the east coast manufacturing facilities.

 

If there's a Spanish influence, the bellows would be paired single-acting horizontal concertina-looking things until after the 1850s.

 

So, where are you and who do you want to be? :huh:

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Actually, people seem to think that Washington State is STILL the wild west. My Dad used to tell the story about going to Vermont in the early '60's where a lady in a gas station wanted to know whether "they had roads all the way out there?". Marianne had a collegue just last week mention that he thought "everybody in Seattle lived on acreage". We do, but we're just 20 minutes from Microsoft. Wild is where you find it.

 

Marianne is into historical recreation (1820's fur trade), but her persona is Spanish Californio, where women carried swords, and rode astride, just my kinda girl :lol: .

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

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Again, it DOES matter what kind of old west or when. Where I live, we were the western frontier between around 1760-1790, and were referred to as the "old west" in writing until the 1890s. Where Geoff lives they were the western frontier from around 1806-1890. A LOT of stuff happened during that time, and some folks don't consider either East Tennessee or Washington to be in any way "old west."

 

James' advice isn't bad, a clay-lined wooden box was fairly normal for an expedient (portable is not really the word you're looking for until after 1875 or so) forge. Bellows are fine no matter what, hand crank blowers start to show up after about 1880 or so, depending on how close to a railroad you live. Cast iron bottom-blast firepots are of the same period. Side-blown and bottom-blown charcoal forges made from a box of clay are fine mid-1800s things. Entire cast iron or stamped steel forges in the U.S. generally don't show up until the 1880s and later, especially the further you get from the east coast manufacturing facilities.

 

If there's a Spanish influence, the bellows would be paired single-acting horizontal concertina-looking things until after the 1850s.

 

So, where are you and who do you want to be? :huh:

First off thank from the history lesson. I'm going to have to look more into it and learn more!laugh.gif

 

I don't know if there is any area they are trying to represent. I will need to fined out.

 

Thank you very much.

Thank you very much.

 

 

 

 

‎"We all want progress, but if you're on the wrong road, progress means doing an about-turn and walking back to the right road; in that case, the man who turns back soonest is the most progressive.” - C.S. Lewis

 

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Again, it DOES matter what kind of old west or when. Where I live, we were the western frontier between around 1760-1790, and were referred to as the "old west" in writing until the 1890s. Where Geoff lives they were the western frontier from around 1806-1890. A LOT of stuff happened during that time, and some folks don't consider either East Tennessee or Washington to be in any way "old west."

 

James' advice isn't bad, a clay-lined wooden box was fairly normal for an expedient (portable is not really the word you're looking for until after 1875 or so) forge. Bellows are fine no matter what, hand crank blowers start to show up after about 1880 or so, depending on how close to a railroad you live. Cast iron bottom-blast firepots are of the same period. Side-blown and bottom-blown charcoal forges made from a box of clay are fine mid-1800s things. Entire cast iron or stamped steel forges in the U.S. generally don't show up until the 1880s and later, especially the further you get from the east coast manufacturing facilities.

 

If there's a Spanish influence, the bellows would be paired single-acting horizontal concertina-looking things until after the 1850s.

 

So, where are you and who do you want to be? :huh:

First off thank from the history lesson. I'm going to have to look more into it and learn more!laugh.gif I'll look in to that wood box plan.

 

I don't know if there is any area they are trying to represent. I will need to fine out.

 

Thank you very much.

Edited by ES Blade

 

‎"We all want progress, but if you're on the wrong road, progress means doing an about-turn and walking back to the right road; in that case, the man who turns back soonest is the most progressive.” - C.S. Lewis

 

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