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Different mokume concept


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This may have been done before but I don't ever recall seeing it.

 

I drilled out five 1/8" holes lengthwise in some 1/2" mild square bar.

 

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Then ran 1/8" copper rod (cleaned) and peened it tight.

 

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Heated up to bright orange and gave it a few thunks on all four sides. Then I twisted it one full turn.

 

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Flattened it out to 1/4" and squared it up a bit.

 

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Next time I will either peen some 1/8" mild into the holes or weld a blob on each end. Some of the copper extruded out.

 

After milling/grinding both sides I got an abstract zebra strip pattern with no voids and a good weld between the metals.

 

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The other side.

 

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After a quick dip in 1:1 FC

 

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There are dozens of different designs and metal combos to try. On my next one I will do three holes on each side. Or four holes with a smaller rod dia. You could also use bigger square (or round) bar. The center hole is a waste unless you use a larger dia. so you don't have dig too much to expose it.

 

Another concept I will try is drilling out holes across the bar and hammering down flat for a raindrop type pattern.

 

On lower melting point metals you can plug the ends with a weld or cold hammer the ends closed.

 

Maybe fill the holes up with mixed powderd metals.? Layering the powdered metals?

 

Opposing twists? Running a much smaller diameter steel rod down through a powdered metal?

 

More holes equals more complex patterns.

 

Lots of possibilities to play with.

 

You won't get the complex patterns of regular mokume but there is little to no chance of screwing up this process.

 

All you need is a drill press and forge.

Edited by B Finnigan
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interesting idea that is brent, are the holes drilled straight through the bar or just halfway then the same done on the opposite end?

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Straight through which is a little time consuming but it's just mild steel. 6' drill bits make it faster.

 

BTW, the above pic is a bit underwhelming but this thread is about the concept and to see how many ways you guys can come up with to use it.

Edited by B Finnigan
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  • 2 months later...

Straight through which is a little time consuming but it's just mild steel. 6' drill bits make it faster.

 

BTW, the above pic is a bit underwhelming but this thread is about the concept and to see how many ways you guys can come up with to use it.

 

Did you use any flux for this or was it just sealed off from the peening? I really think that this concept has some great potential. I will most likely give it a try next time I am at the shop.

Edited by Anthony C
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No flux just two clean surfaces. Copper and copper alloys will weld (solder) to steel. The copper will melt and adhere to the steel and it's encased so there is no oxidation.

 

It is a bit time consuming to drill out those long holes. And after blowing out the side on two of them I used bigger stock and stayed away from the sides. A little deviation towards the middle or side will just make the pattern more random. But deviation to the outside screws it up. On the bigger stock I either saw the excess off the four sides or surface grind it off.

 

I have come up with several interesting combos since then.

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Cool idea. I'm brainstorming hexagons and you gave me a thought or two. :)

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  • 1 month later...

Interesting... I just posted a knife last week or the week before with a similar concept.. I filled a 1 inch square tube with 1084 powder and twisted copper cable. Very similar results....

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