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where do i start?


KC Jones

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the science of metalurgy is completely foreign to me :-p somebody wanna point me to the best place to start learning about the structure of steel and how HT affects it? if there is a book i co0uld get from the library that would be the best solution i do believe:)

Isaiah 6:8

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, "Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?" And I said, "Here am I. Send me!"

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thanks:) i found a mention of that buried in another post here hehe. cheapest i could see online was $88. might be my christmas present this year hehe.

Isaiah 6:8

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, "Whom shall I send? And who will go for us?" And I said, "Here am I. Send me!"

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I bought a use copy of "Metallurgy Theory and Practice". If memory serves the author is Dell Allen. It is an older text that has had many republishings. It gives a good overview of the basics and the basics haven't changed. It can commonly be found in used book stores for less than $10-15 US. If you need to go online to order, try powells books (not real sure on the spelling of that).

 

ron

Having watched government for some time, it has become obvious that our government is no longer for the people. If the current trend continues, it won't be long untill armed rebellion is required.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Take a look at Houghton on Quenching - a good little tome that is pretty non-commercial. It will give you the basics. The file size is too big (just over the 2Mb limit). But I can email it to you - email me at smackenzie@houghtonintl.com. Maybe I can get Don to put it in the archives.

 

Scott

D. Scott MacKenzie, PhD

Heat Treating (Aluminum and Steel)

Quenching (Water, Polymer, Oil, Salt and Mar-Tempering)

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I feel your pain, bro. I had to put a book on metallury on my wish list on Amazon myself until I have enough spare change to get it. Living on a pension makes spare change something that is few and far between. I doubt that you could find that at a library but it is well worth having. Back when I had a job I got it and I refere to it often. It's sometimes kept by my bed for light reading before I nod off for the night.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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KC, I just followed up on Ron's suggestion and went looking for Metallurgy Theory and Practice. I found it at Abebooks for $3.95, shipping included. They have another one listed and other sellers, just google "use books", have them listed. I stopped looking when I saw a $1 sale price, but I didn't notice any that were over $5. There were over 40 listings and I didn't look at them all. For $1 and $2.95 shipping I don't care what the book looks like or how old it is. You might want to take a look, however I still highly recommend Verhoeven's book.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Verhoeven's book is absolutely the most concise while complete explanation of my questions. Every other more concise explanation I have read has been wrong in some way.

It used to be available as free download. I'm sure the book itself was much cheaper then (when I got it).

It is still available free to read online from google books. So you can check it is right for you before you buy.

Well worth the $$ and better value in the US than UK where we have to pay the same in ££.

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I agree about Verhoeven's book being the best out there on Steel Metallurgy, unless one wants to invest in some very technical, and quite expensive, text books on the subject. However, one must keep in mind that it is not all inclusive. As the title indicates it only deals with ferrous metals so it is lacking in some things about general metallurgy. It also covers what would probably be a two semester course in 200 pages, some of those pages are summaries and references so it's really less than that. As a result, there are only enough room to hit the high points of steel matallury so the scope of "Steel Metallurgy for the Non-Metallurgist" is rather limited. One may want to consider a book that deals with general metalury to compliment Verhoeven's text.

 

Doug Lester

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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