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Frontier Dagger: A Xmas CactusRose #39


Wild Rose

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Just in time for Christmas biggrin.gif

 

- this one was styled after daggers made along the American Frontier from the late 1700's through the late 1800's. The 7 1/2" blade of 1084 steel was hand forged by the late Gib Guignard of Cactus Forge. The grip is white tail deer leg bone with a rawhide wrap and linen thread overwrap at three places, a brass double guard, and some brass tacks for decoration.

 

The sheath has a bark tan leather core, deer rawhide cover and alum tawed sheepskin cuff and belt loop. Sheath decoration includes two weeping heart inlays (a common deco motif of the period), glass pound beads, hand cut wrought iron tacks, and tin cone tinklers with horse hair tufts. There is a simple leather whang retention strap decorated with a tin cone, brass, and glass beads.

 

Hope ya'll enjoy - this is one of my favorites and it all came together "smoothly" - many others do not................

 

 

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Chuck Burrows

Wild Rose Trading Co

chuck@wrtcleather.com

www.wrtcleather.com

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That's a great looking knife and sheath. What the little thing to the right of it in the pictures?

Bob O

 

"When I raise my flashing sword, and my hand takes hold on judgment, I will take vengeance upon mine enemies, and I will repay those who haze me. Oh, Lord, raise me to Thy right hand and count me among Thy saints."

 

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Thanks and glad ya'll enjoyed the look.......

 

Bob - That's a "medicine bottle" used by the Rocky Mtn Trappers to carry their scent lure in - the scent lure was made from the beaver's musk glands with other aditves. In this case it's a small wooden container (bored out willow limb) with a rawhide wrap

 

Jim P - I dye bone with Fiebings leather dye generally..........I prefer getting raw bone and processing it myself. Rather than boil and use bleach or such things as TSP (which tend to make the bone brittle) I take the raw bone and cut it so the marrow is exposed, then just cover it in a pan of water. I then cook it down slowly until no water is left. After it's cool I remove any marrow that's left and then hand wash well in hot soapy water and then rinse well in clear water. This "cooks" the fatty marrow into the bone making for a less brittle bone that's also closer to the way original bones was used/handled up.

Chuck Burrows

Wild Rose Trading Co

chuck@wrtcleather.com

www.wrtcleather.com

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