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Dumb, ignorant kydex question


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Fellow Ferrophiles,

 

I had a shop teacher that stated he doesn't mind dumb questions, only stupid ones. Nice guy.

 

I have never worked with kydex and never intended to but I have a project that must use it.

 

My question is: once you mold the kydex and it's cold again, is it supposed to be glued together strongly? I have been able to pull all mine apart. It would make sense if it was joined securely, but then why do almost all sheaths have rivets?

 

<blush>

 

Much thanks,

Adriaan

Adriaan Gerber

http://www.adriaangerberknives.com

sharp@adriaangerberknives.com

(207) 667-1307

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Fellow Ferrophiles,

 

I had a shop teacher that stated he doesn't mind dumb questions, only stupid ones. Nice guy.

 

I have never worked with kydex and never intended to but I have a project that must use it.

 

My question is: once you mold the kydex and it's cold again, is it supposed to be glued together strongly? I have been able to pull all mine apart. It would make sense if it was joined securely, but then why do almost all sheaths have rivets?

 

<blush>

 

Much thanks,

Adriaan

 

Adriaan, I don't use it a whole lot, but when I do I never use glue, just rivets. I'm always happy with how it holds together.

 

-Todd

www.toddblades.com

 

"Geometry says how sharp, steel says how long." - Roman Landes, Ashokan 2009

 

"People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf."

 

- George Orwell

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Adrian

Most use rivets, to join together Kydex from what I have seen. You could also use Chicago screws if you dont want to buy the special dies to close up the brass

rivets most use to join kydex.

Chris

Chris Williams

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Glue does not adhere well to Kydex because it is not porous--you would need to use epoxy to really have any effective adhesion. The Kydex will stick to itself a bit after being heated and molded, but rivets and eyelets are your best bet for assembling

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  • 10 months later...

i use leather rivets and eyelets i got the real nice setting dies for the kydex eyelets then realized i should have gotten the larger set i turned a tool steel shaft in my lathe flat with taper then flat again (shelf with taper to it) and have been setting the large ones quite nicely with out the cost and back in the day i would have turned it in the drill press

Brandon Sawisch bladesmith

 

eagles may soar but weasels don't get sucked in to jet engines

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  • 1 month later...

I haven;t used kydex much, but i have used it enough to know that rivets seem to work best for me. I have also saddle stitched it in once instance. I didn;t account for a very thick blade well enough and the rivets would have rubbed on the cutting edge, so I stitched the entire edge. This particular sheath is for a machete style camp knife. it's far too heavy for daily use, but works well for camping trips to split small wood pieces for fires, and what not. I drilled the blade to lighten it a bit, but it's still rather heavy. I ground this out (pure stock removal) while heat trating a sword.

 

P4090001.jpg

P4090003.jpg

Have you ever thought about the life of steel? It's interesting to think that you can control the fate of a piece of metal.

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