Jump to content

In between Commissions


Recommended Posts

Hi all I just wanted to post an O-kissaki Wakizashi blade that I forged in between commission work. It was a piece of 1075 that was left over from a katana, It has a 17 1/2" nagasa with a motohaba of 1 3/8" and a sakihaba ( hope I got this right ) of just over an 1" and a 3" kissaki.

 

The blade has a very high Shinogi, with a Furisode Nakago. This is the same Nakago style I used on Aaron Justices katana, as I am testing different styles for blades and to gain more experience forging them.

 

Any ways here are some images of the blade.

DSC_1671.jpg

DSC_1668.jpg

DSC_1669.jpg

DSC_1670.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

John, looks good so far. If you have the same experience I have with this alloy (if it is the low Mn) then you should be able to get a truly wicked hamon when the time comes. Moves like butter, too.

 

I think that this particular side effect of this alloy's chemistry has helped me sell several blades recently. It cleans up quite nicely (unlike most of us).

 

I don't know enough about Japanese tradition to comment on the ratio of the two bevels (height of shinogi), I am assuming there is a precedent for this style. The shape of the nakago is intriguing, and I can't wait to see the handle. It seems that the Chinese exported the ridged idea to the Japanese, but then forgot it themselves until they later had conflict with the Japanese. Most very early Chinese blades had the ridge, Bronze Age and early Iron Age, then there is/are one or two waves of change where the ridged style leaves and comes back. The final re-emergence was due to fighting Japanese, who had ridged swords (that they originally learned from Chinese). convoluted history, and looooooooooooonnnnnnnnnggggggggggg, too.

 

I have someone who wants me to make a tanto with the extended point, and I am glad to see you doing something similar. Maybe I can learn a little from you.

keep us posted. thanks for sharing. I also like all the vids you posted on the Tube on previous stuff.

 

kc

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)
Link to post
Share on other sites

David

 

Lots of practice is all I can say and Kevin I am hoping this 1075 works like I hope it will and if it does I plan on doing a Katana from it as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks Good John,

 

I like the shape of the Kissaki. To me a wakazashi is an up close thrusting weapon. Seems like the long point and narrow shinogi would make it ideal for sneaking in between various armour and body parts.

 

Regarding the 1075 steel.

 

I am going to order some steel from Aldo this month and was going for his new batch of W-2. I know you have used both. I want to stick with one steel for a while to really get to know it.

 

What would you say is the pros and cons between W-2 and 1075 (low manganese)?

 

Anybody else please feel free to chime in on the subject as well.

 

Thanks,

Dan

Link to post
Share on other sites

Vanadium - that is the pro.

 

w2 should give nearly the same hammon, but with a lot more durability.

 

It will also be harder to shape and work with all types of tooling.

finally - w2 is harder to heat treat (works best with controlled soak sort of like 1095)

 

the 1075 is a little less durable (wear resistant), I don't know which will resist cracking better when hardened (the 1075 may), they will be close in terms of "low hardenability." The 1075, having lower carbon and low manganese, is "low."

The w2, because of the relative stability of vanadium carbides, will have a very fine grain, or more accurately, it will be simpler to maintain a fine grain that it would be in a simillar alloy without vanadium. So, I don't honestly know which would be better at hardening or worse at forming hamons. They are both pretty wicked, in the hamon dept. The difference may not be something that one can see.

 

The 1075 is a joy to hammer and file, and it is easier to heat treat. It will abrade/wear more easily, and I don't know the answer to which will crack more easily if both are properly heat treated (including temper).

 

John, sorry for answering so much in your thread.

 

kc

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)
Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Kevin,

 

So keeping in mind I am using a traditional side blown charcoal forge, it sounds like the 1075 may be the better choice-for now anyway. I used a commercial 1070 in the past so I am familiar with it, although I will be relearning to some extent.

 

I can see the value of vanadium in a plane blade or a using knife for the wear resistance. Not sure of its value in a sword.

 

I have seen some great hamons in the W-2-that is what attracted me to it in the first place.

 

Dan

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...