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Laminated Hunter


Karl B. Andersen
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Here's one that should make a great Every-Day-Carry Hunter/Utility. You know what I mean.

I forged this blade from a bar I laminated with 203E corrosion resistant steel onto the outside of a piece of 1095 High Carbon tool steel.

The 203E will protect the 1095 core from stain and corrosion except for the exposed working portion of the blade.

The inset photo shows the cool shiny reflection from the iron at the edge of the 203E that I could not get to show in the other photos.

The guard is stainless.

The handle is Stabilized Curly Walnut.

All designed in the Andersen Forge Take-down method.

 

CWg-1.jpg

 

CWj-1.jpg

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Great hunter Karl. Would you have any comments on what's happening to the 203E to cause the random pattern welded appearance. Nice informative pics. Really interesting 203E, even where it appears thick enough to be less influenced by the 1095.

 

Take care, Craig

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Great hunter Karl. Would you have any comments on what's happening to the 203E to cause the random pattern welded appearance. Nice informative pics. Really interesting 203E, even where it appears thick enough to be less influenced by the 1095.

 

Take care, Craig

 

 

Craig, 203E is very susceptible to carbon migration. It has just enough nickel to become quite corrosion resistant, but not enough to inhibit C. migration.

It was once quite prevalent as a Damascus layer with high C. steels like W2.

As I grind that 203 from the edge up, it becomes thicker and thicker, and right at a zero edge at the bottom.

I believe what we're seeing is the Carbon concentrations in varying degrees of hardness from the zero edge up and it etches out differently showing the graduation of hard to soft.

It make sense to me.

Note that the "Damascus-y" appearance exactly follows the bottom edge of the laminate. The slight undulations are the result of the the combination of Power hammer and press in the welding and drawing out steps.

 

I might also add this - see on the lower photo where I show the choil? See that shiny layer between the 203 and the 1095? That's the same layer that I put in the inset photo at the top.

I think that layer there is pure iron where the 203 has "sucked" the carbon out of the 1095.

That is a visual demonstration of the C. migration.

Edited by Karl B. Andersen
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That is a wonderful effect. Beautiful, and still very practical. Thanks for the demonstration and explanation.

I not only love the knife, I believe that I just learned something, or at least have seen a quite striking example of what had only been an abstract principle.

 

thanks,

kc

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

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Well, whatever the explanation for the appearance of the steel, it's a really beautiful knife!

Check out Walter's instructional videos:

Forging Japanese Style Blades

Making Hamons

Japanese Sword Mounting

Polishing

Making Japanese Sword Fittings

www.waltersorrellsblades.com
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