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Chef Knife Awesomeness


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This one is destined for a passaround on another forum.

 

but it's turning out so freakin sweet I had to share with my friends up in here.

 

Sorry for the crappy cell phone piccys

 

250mm French'ish pattern

Made from Don's W2

haven't picked out a wood for the handle yet, most likely cocobolo.

 

french-wip1.jpg

 

french-wip2.jpg

 

yep, I really cut a 1 1/2" hemp rope with it (kinda sucked w/out a handle, oops)

also chopped into a 2x4 a bunch but it would just bite really deep and stick, which I expected

and hacked at a very very dry piece of bamboo which did manage to roll the edge a little.

 

french-wip3.jpg

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Looks really good. I like chefs knives I do almost everything with one. How thin is it? I made a chefs knife for my daughter for Christmas. I gave it to her sharp enough to shave with. First time she used it she asked me to sharpen it. I told her it was sharp, it was. I tried it myself and it was like a splitting maul. A sharp one but still more like a maul. I reground about half the thickness away and it made a world of difference. Maybe everybody knows this but I didn't. Todd

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IIRC Stephan used to work in a kitchen, so I'd expect his take on a chef's knife to work for the task at hand. :)

 

Now then: Stephan! Way to rock the integral bolster, dude! How about African Blackwood for the handle? Simple and dramatic? With stainless pins?

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IIRC Stephan used to work in a kitchen, so I'd expect his take on a chef's knife to work for the task at hand. :)

 

Now then: Stephan! Way to rock the integral bolster, dude! How about African Blackwood for the handle? Simple and dramatic? With stainless pins?

 

Yep, I worked at a fish place in Buckhead Atl for a couple years.

 

the spine is .09 at the thickest and tapers down to .008 at the edge before sharpening. it's THIN

 

I really like blackwood but I don't have any on hand, and I do have cocobolo so that is likely what it will get.

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Stephan,

 

that looks like a classic... At Ashokan last year a guy Dave Martell did a demo on kitchen knives... one of his comments was about

 

how most of us makers look down on kitchen knives as not being exciting enough to make.. His point was that there are a small amount of

 

customers out there for a custom bowies , folders , or whatever... and a bunch of us all trying to get their attention... But everybody needs a

 

kitchen knife and so the pool of customers is sooooo much larger... and the kitchen knife is something that will get used as well.. One of the

 

best lectures I have caught on blademaking ....

 

So yours looks right up the alley he was talking about.... thin & sharptongue.gif

 

Dick

 

 

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Stephan,

 

that looks like a classic... At Ashokan last year a guy Dave Martell did a demo on kitchen knives... one of his comments was about

 

how most of us makers look down on kitchen knives as not being exciting enough to make.. His point was that there are a small amount of

 

customers out there for a custom bowies , folders , or whatever... and a bunch of us all trying to get their attention... But everybody needs a

 

kitchen knife and so the pool of customers is sooooo much larger... and the kitchen knife is something that will get used as well.. One of the

 

best lectures I have caught on blademaking ....

 

So yours looks right up the alley he was talking about.... thin & sharptongue.gif

 

Dick

 

 

 

Actually this knife is for Dave to do a passaround and start introducing me to the kitchen market

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Actually this knife is for Dave to do a passaround and start introducing me to the kitchen market

 

Hey, remember Ethan Becker who conducted the kitchen cutting competitions at Harley's and Bowie's? The co-author of the most recent edition of The Joy of Cooking and importer/purveyor of extremely high-end kitchen cutlery? You should send him one to see what he can do for you. ;)

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Hey, remember Ethan Becker who conducted the kitchen cutting competitions at Harley's and Bowie's? The co-author of the most recent edition of The Joy of Cooking and importer/purveyor of extremely high-end kitchen cutlery? You should send him one to see what he can do for you. ;)

 

 

Yep, I catch up with Ethan every so often, I am hoping to put one in his hands at Blade this year. if all my other scheduling commitments don't kill me first.

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Nice job on the bolster. Those are not easy to do at all. None of my attempts at integrals are anything I'm willing to share!

 

The spine on this one falls at just over 2mm, 2.159mm according to the online conversion. Is this correct? Seems thin and flexible enough to be a boning or fillet knife. How does a blade this thin stand up to everyday use? Will the blade deflect to the side when chopping something like carrots? Is the width of the blade enough to prevent deflection, or does the blade get used primarily in a pull cut or slicing manner instead of to chop? I am not trying to say that your knife is "right" or "wrong," just curious about your thoughts on blade thickness as related to performance and what your expectations are of how the knife will be employed.

 

~Bruce~

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Nice job on the bolster. Those are not easy to do at all. None of my attempts at integrals are anything I'm willing to share!

 

The spine on this one falls at just over 2mm, 2.159mm according to the online conversion. Is this correct? Seems thin and flexible enough to be a boning or fillet knife. How does a blade this thin stand up to everyday use? Will the blade deflect to the side when chopping something like carrots? Is the width of the blade enough to prevent deflection, or does the blade get used primarily in a pull cut or slicing manner instead of to chop? I am not trying to say that your knife is "right" or "wrong," just curious about your thoughts on blade thickness as related to performance and what your expectations are of how the knife will be employed.

 

~Bruce~

 

great questions.

 

I've not had any problems with deflection yet working such things as carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, and boning chicken.

I'm sending this blade to a bunch of serious chef knife users to get feedback and see how it does. I personally would rather have a thicker spine, around 3.5mm but all of the buyers I've talked to want the thinnest possible.

 

This knife is designed and intended to be a general purpose chef's knife, it needs to be thin enough to do fine cuts on hard vegetables, flexy enough to occasionally fillet fish, tough enough to bone out a chicken or break down and french a rack or lamb, and needs to be hard enough to not need sharpening every 15 minutes.

 

however it isn't expected to be really "awesome" at any of those tasks, it's kind of the jack of all trades.

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great questions.

 

I've not had any problems with deflection yet working such things as carrots, parsnips, sweet potatoes, and boning chicken.

I'm sending this blade to a bunch of serious chef knife users to get feedback and see how it does. I personally would rather have a thicker spine, around 3.5mm but all of the buyers I've talked to want the thinnest possible.

 

This knife is designed and intended to be a general purpose chef's knife, it needs to be thin enough to do fine cuts on hard vegetables, flexy enough to occasionally fillet fish, tough enough to bone out a chicken or break down and french a rack or lamb, and needs to be hard enough to not need sharpening every 15 minutes.

 

however it isn't expected to be really "awesome" at any of those tasks, it's kind of the jack of all trades.

 

The thing about professional chef's knives is that they more often are quite work specific. Its the old saying " the jack of all trades is a master of none" ..

Personally i fell in love with the thinner knives like those of VICTORINOX and GLOBAL. In norway we have a manufacturer called ØYO, which use the thicker 3.5mm blades. the problem with thick blades is that it require more strength to handle, and therefore strains the wrist more than lighter blades ( unless one's looking for a chopper) ...

 

The one you have made there is an absolute beauty. may i ask for how its balance is ? .. even with chefs thats an issue, as it goes to the handling and "feeling" of weight .. :)

 

-vidar-

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What do you mean by deflection, like the blade twisting to the side as it comes down in a chop?

 

yep, if the blade is to thin when you go to cut hard vegetables the blade will twist and bend as you cut in, it's a very fine balance to strike as a knifemaker to get the knife thin enough to slice easily but still thick enough to be stable when cutting hard root veggies.

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The thing about professional chef's knives is that they more often are quite work specific. Its the old saying " the jack of all trades is a master of none" ..

Personally i fell in love with the thinner knives like those of VICTORINOX and GLOBAL. In norway we have a manufacturer called ØYO, which use the thicker 3.5mm blades. the problem with thick blades is that it require more strength to handle, and therefore strains the wrist more than lighter blades ( unless one's looking for a chopper) ...

 

The one you have made there is an absolute beauty. may i ask for how its balance is ? .. even with chefs thats an issue, as it goes to the handling and "feeling" of weight .. :)

 

-vidar-

 

 

it balances at the "er" of my makers mark, so about 1/2 in in front of the bolster.

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Gotcha. I've been enjoying using my tester, it's a japanese styled santoku I'd made. I think it's a touch over 2mm at the spine. I think on the next I may take the grind a little higher as it doesn't go too far up the blade, I'd imagine yours would slice a fair bit better due to the full flat grind.

I've been enjoying this one though. Buying up some handle materials to do a few more of them.

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