Jump to content

$500 power hammer kit??


Recommended Posts

I doubt that you can get a good kit for $500.00.

L'il Abner sells the plans for $225pp. Basic kit (plan set with cylinder & valves) $575 + s&h. Deluxe kit (basic kit w/ fittings & hoses), &795 + s&h. See at www.rmetalart.com. Order from Bert Romans, PO Box 899, Mulino, Or 97042. 503/632-1947.

If you were to attend a Tire Hammer workshop you would spend about $1,000.00 and probably as much for other parts for the L'il Abner.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently completed building an Appalachian style hammer. I wouldn’t call them plans so much as some hand drawn sketches that suggest how you might build it. Mine has a 40 pound ram, and a slightly different setup for the drive system. I am very happy with the results. I am able to draw 1” square bar 8” long out to 1/4 x 1-1/4 x 22” in 3 heats. As I become more proficient with it, I can probably get it in 2.

 

All said and done I probably have close to $700 in mine, but I added some cost to the drive system. If anybody is interested I can post some more details and photos.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I recently completed building an Appalachian style hammer. I wouldn’t call them plans so much as some hand drawn sketches that suggest how you might build it. Mine has a 40 pound ram, and a slightly different setup for the drive system. I am very happy with the results. I am able to draw 1” square bar 8” long out to 1/4 x 1-1/4 x 22” in 3 heats. As I become more proficient with it, I can probably get it in 2.

 

All said and done I probably have close to $700 in mine, but I added some cost to the drive system. If anybody is interested I can post some more details and photos.

 

 

Details please...

Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks for the info guys been helpful, i know i found that kit, looked to good to be true maybe it was. That kit had all the hardware minus a few large main pieces of steel for frame and head. Have found all the guys online with plans from $15 to $85, really no help though without all the hard to find hardware, thanks again for the help, i'll post some pics as soon as i can of my work..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the info on ‘Spronk’, my homebuilt mechanical power hammer. It is based on the Appalachian style Rusty/Dusty hammer. It has a 40 pound ram (including die) and runs on a 1.5 hp 1710 rpm TFEC motor. The main spring is 42” x 3/16 x 2.5” with a top and bottom support spring at 30” x 3/16 x 2.5”. The stroke length is 7” though when going full tilt it is probably more like 9” with the whip at the top. With the turnbuckle I have installed the working height is adjustable 2 inches down for narrower dies and 4 inches up for a total range of 6 inches. The anvil weight, including base plate is about 650 pounds.

 

The part I did a little differently is the way the drive works. Instead of using a pulley that goes directly to the crank or using the spare tire method, I have a 2 stage power system. I have a 2” pulley on the motor that runs a 12 inch pulley. On that shaft I have a 50 pound flywheel and 10 inch pulley. The 10” pulley in turn drives a 12” pulley on the crank with a slip belt. That way the flywheel is loaded with inertia before you start running the ram. This makes it so the first strike is as hard as subsequent strikes and there is no run on when you let off the treadle. It also helps smooth the load on the motor out. Many of the commercially built hammers I looked at have a large flywheel that is used to engage the tup via a clutch system. I was trying to replicate that system. So far it seems to run really well. As a test I did run it without the flywheel and there was a noticeable difference in performance.

 

I have photos of the hammer HERE

 

I also have a video of drawing a 1” bar

 

Part way through the video I realized my top die had loosened up, so a little bit of the draw is, but otherwise that is the total time it took to draw an 8” bar out to 1/4 x 22”. I don’t have experience with any other hammers so I’m not sure how it compares overall, however I can say I am really pleased with the performance.

 

Mark

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's really good performance! I like what you did with the pulleys, and that's a fine job on the combo dies.

 

Is that as fast as it'll run? I ask only because my 50# Star runs about twice that fast when it's going flat out. That's not a criticism, it's hard to control at that speed so I usually run it slightly faster than you were going there. B)

 

If I ever put it on a proper foundation it'd be much more controllable at top speed, but that's so far down the to-do list I won't even speculate on when that will happen. :wacko:

Link to post
Share on other sites

That's really good performance! I like what you did with the pulleys, and that's a fine job on the combo dies.

 

Is that as fast as it'll run? I ask only because my 50# Star runs about twice that fast when it's going flat out. That's not a criticism, it's hard to control at that speed so I usually run it slightly faster than you were going there. B)

 

If I ever put it on a proper foundation it'd be much more controllable at top speed, but that's so far down the to-do list I won't even speculate on when that will happen. :wacko:

 

 

Thanks! Currently that is the top speed, but that is something I need to work on. It seems to run about 160 bpm, but by my calculations it should be running closer to 250 bpm. I think it is a timing issue with the whip on the spring that is causing some take out on the speed. I have only been running it a little while so I haven't had a chance to really learn how to tweek it. All I know is that it is already a huge improvement over drawing pattern welded billets out by hand. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

SPRONK!!!!!!! nice job man....i'm planning on adding a second hammer to the shop, and think this will be the hammer style to make..(plus it will put that 2000lb block i have to use!!)

 

 

 

alan your sure your hammer's motor/ pulleys ect are set up right? 320 bpms seems wwwway to fast(unless your running a pullmax or that sorta hammer)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Here is the info on ‘Spronk’, my homebuilt mechanical power hammer. It is based on the Appalachian style Rusty/Dusty hammer. It has a 40 pound ram (including die) and runs on a 1.5 hp 1710 rpm TFEC motor. The main spring is 42” x 3/16 x 2.5” with a top and bottom support spring at 30” x 3/16 x 2.5”. The stroke length is 7” though when going full tilt it is probably more like 9” with the whip at the top. With the turnbuckle I have installed the working height is adjustable 2 inches down for narrower dies and 4 inches up for a total range of 6 inches. The anvil weight, including base plate is about 650 pounds.

 

The part I did a little differently is the way the drive works. Instead of using a pulley that goes directly to the crank or using the spare tire method, I have a 2 stage power system. I have a 2” pulley on the motor that runs a 12 inch pulley. On that shaft I have a 50 pound flywheel and 10 inch pulley. The 10” pulley in turn drives a 12” pulley on the crank with a slip belt. That way the flywheel is loaded with inertia before you start running the ram. This makes it so the first strike is as hard as subsequent strikes and there is no run on when you let off the treadle. It also helps smooth the load on the motor out. Many of the commercially built hammers I looked at have a large flywheel that is used to engage the tup via a clutch system. I was trying to replicate that system. So far it seems to run really well. As a test I did run it without the flywheel and there was a noticeable difference in performance.

 

I have photos of the hammer HERE

 

I also have a video of drawing a 1” bar

 

Part way through the video I realized my top die had loosened up, so a little bit of the draw is, but otherwise that is the total time it took to draw an 8” bar out to 1/4 x 22”. I don’t have experience with any other hammers so I’m not sure how it compares overall, however I can say I am really pleased with the performance.

 

Mark

Thanks a bunch Mark for those great Photo's. Makes it clear even for me.
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just remember a couple years ago one of the member's made one of these hammers and used it a couple years, then one day out of the blue the thing came apart and almost killed him. Not saying to not build or not use one, just a serious reminder these things can be dangerous. Even Little Giants can sometimes come apart to maim and kill, take a look at some of the extra safety cages that are added to them by those aware of past accidents.

Link to post
Share on other sites
alan your sure your hammer's motor/ pulleys ect are set up right? 320 bpms seems wwwway to fast(unless your running a pullmax or that sorta hammer)

 

Hey, Pete,

 

I was just going off the apparent speed in the video. My hammer at full blast runs around 240 bpm, which would be perfect if it would just hold still... :lol:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, Pete,

 

I was just going off the apparent speed in the video. My hammer at full blast runs around 240 bpm, which would be perfect if it would just hold still... :lol:

240 seems just right,maybe a tad slow even if your hammer is under 100lb..and yeah the holding still part is important!!lol: )

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...