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Cal G

HYDRAULIC FORGING PRESS AND POWER UNIT

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I have just re designed the power unit and the hydraulic circuit on my forging press.

The press has a 6 inch bore cylinder with a 3 inch rod and is operated with a 5 GPM pump and a regeneration circuit for faster speed.

The system pressure is set at 2500 psi which gives you 70,000 pounds of force out of the cylinder.

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Edited by Cal G

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Nice press! I like that it's on wheels.

 

It may just be the way the photo look, but the control levers don't seem to be in a convenient place to use while forging. Do you find them a bit too high and right for comfortable use?

 

--Dave

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Nice press! I like that it's on wheels.

 

It may just be the way the photo look, but the control levers don't seem to be in a convenient place to use while forging. Do you find them a bit too high and right for comfortable use?

 

--Dave

The levers are just the right height. They could be shortened if required. I hate foot pedals especially when you are putting a pattern in Damascus or splitting a billet and you only want to move a little steel or you need fine contol over the amount you are pressing.

The second lever is for a rolling mill that is getting near completion. It is going to be mounted on the side of the press.

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That is nice. I like that the power unit and press are seperate units. I put mine all in one tower. Your setup provides some versatility; with just a little more hose, one could seperate the two by a wall or barrier of some type to reduce noise. They would still be easily movable for maintenance and such.

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That is nice. I like that the power unit and press are seperate units. I put mine all in one tower. Your setup provides some versatility; with just a little more hose, one could seperate the two by a wall or barrier of some type to reduce noise. They would still be easily movable for maintenance and such.

Hydraulic pumps don't have to be noisy if the power unit is designed properly.

You can stand right beside this unit and hardly know it is running.

I was at a knifemakers in Montana once and that pump screamed so loud you couldn't stand the noise. I am sure the fellow is deaf now plus the pump most likly destroyed itself and all of the other hydraulic components.

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Cal, a few questions.

 

Could you tell us about how the regeneration circuit works and what it does ?

 

What HP are you running?

 

What makes a "properly designed power unit" as far as noise is concerned?

 

Thanks.

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Cal, a few questions.

 

Could you tell us about how the regeneration circuit works and what it does ?

 

What HP are you running?

 

What makes a "properly designed power unit" as far as noise is concerned?

 

Thanks.

 

I'd like to know this too. Every press I've been around has been annoying and nearly deafening.

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I'd like to know this too. Every press I've been around has been annoying and nearly deafening.

 

That makes three of us! I wear earplugs in the shop, but I've often wondered about wear and tear on the pump.

 

-d

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I had emailed Cal awhile back and he mentioned that his was an 1800rpm pump at 5gpm (that was lowered to around 2 gpm (variable pump )

 

its the high rpm on the log splitter pumps that does it

 

He's a nice fellow and gave some good advice.. he designs these hyd systems for mines

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So that's what the regenerative circuit's extra speed on the push is doing, overcoming the low GPM rate? :huh:

 

I can understand a high-rpm pump causing both cavitation and that annoying scream.

 

So if I understand what's going on here, he's using a large-diameter cylinder with a regenerative circuit; i.e. there's fluid above and below the piston that is recirculated from above to below in order to speed up the movement on the push stroke, all powered by a relatively low flow rate, low rpm pump? And that's why it's quiet(er)?

 

Not that I could do much with one at present, but there's truly no equal to a big press and a big, hot gas forge for the production of large amounts of pattern-welded billets, or at least for setting the first weld in a stack of straight laminate. B) Someday... :(

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