Jump to content

Old World techniques


Adriaan Gerber

Recommended Posts

Fellow Ferrophiles,

 

I recently read the term "Old World knifemaking techniques" and I was wondering what that means exactly. I think it was referring to Virgil England's fit and finish methods.

 

Any help will be appreciated,

Adriaan

Adriaan Gerber

http://www.adriaangerberknives.com

sharp@adriaangerberknives.com

(207) 667-1307

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's called "Marketing 101," AKA BS. :lol:

 

Nothing against Virgil England of course, he's really good, but any time you come upon an empty term like that it's just the sizzle on the steak, as it were.

 

Now, if you find something specific like "hand pushed graver engraving" or "no power tools used" those are also marketing terms BUT they actually refer to specific processes.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Considering the fact that, pre European settlement, the cultures in the Americas were pretty much stone age any knife making techniques are pretty much old world.

 

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tapping my bullsh1tometer...

 

Well OK, I guess what fooled me was that his stuff looks so old and off-planet and organic. I look at his work and I don't even know what skills you need to do that work. Plus different cultures have very different-looking cutlery.

 

I guess I'm looking for other ways to fit and finish that has the airtightness of modern methods but looks like it just grew like that. For me, filing that slot through the bolster has gotten soooo old :lol: Somebody said that the straight line is godless.

 

I have nothing against anybody's work methods, it's just those knives have my imagination going.

Adriaan Gerber

http://www.adriaangerberknives.com

sharp@adriaangerberknives.com

(207) 667-1307

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Wow I just visited his site. The guy does some phenomenal work. He seems to be a "unique individual" don’t know if I could do the whole mindset thing he's got going on. Well the wife and 5 kids would make it a bit hard regardless. Anyway I ramble. I’m a machinist by profession so I kinda dig the whole done by hand thing. I could mill and fab up things a lot more precise than by hand and give me a cnc grinder and its on!! , but I do it by hand cause I like to do it that way. It’s a challenge. Hell I’m happy making the tools to make the knives. Rambling again…. A fine knife made by any method is a fine knife. The method of its manufacture does not in any way other than ascetically effect its usefulness or function. Whatever makes you happy.

 

As for the bolster if its steel or iron drift it in. saw a guy at a Ren Fair 25 years ago or so “drift welding “ his guards on. Wrapped the blade in wet leather and clamped in a wood vise. Had the guard just undersize and heated the tang and guard together until what to my eyes looked high yellow. Placed a pipe around the tang and light tap moves the guard into place and it looks damn near like an integral. Wish I knew 25 years ago I’d be doing this I’d have asked some questions.

 

Ok now I gotta try it. I’ll report back….

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I think of "old world techniques" I think primarilly of extreme specialisation of crafts. The guy who forged the blade and heat-treated it was NOT the guy who ground and polished it, who did not make the guards and pommels, who likely had nothing to do with the sheath-maker or the engraver/inlay worker. And an entirely seperate person likely assembled the whole thing. They got some incredible work done that way, at the expense of basically being confined to learning one specific aspect of the craft. Mind you, each specialty group did get very, very good at doing that one thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...