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my first w2 blade


kyle o'donnell

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That's a nice blade mate, I'd suggest Olive wood for the handle. It would give a nice contrast, just my opinion though..

"He who seeks rest finds boredom. He who seeks work finds rest." Dylan Thomas

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that is goreous little blade, w2 is such a forgiving metal to work with- for working knives you cant beat it really.

 

is that a trace of a hamon that i see there...?

 

elegant, simple- beautiful!

 

Josh

Onen Hag Ol.

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Every time I see a upswept tip on a blade with the tang inline with the spine of the blade, I think Scagel... That's the direction I would go with it.

 

Good looking blade, and hamon.

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

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A nice bit of antler with a downward curve to contrast the upward sweep of the blade, with a wrought iron guard at the transition.

 

Or, a ball-handled knife is a nicely figured bit of dark wood?

 

Or, you could just send the blade to me for disposal. Then you wouldn't have to worry about hafting the poor thing.

When reason fails...

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Looks like you got the cart in front of the horse, been there, we all have. The number one thing you need to work on is to have an exact plan before you even go to the forge.

 

You may look at some of the Sushi style kitchen knives and the way the handles fit them. That may be an easy way to deal with the fittings issues you created by not working off a plan. Congrats on the Hammon, good to see some fresh enthusiasm.

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Looks like you got the cart in front of the horse, been there, we all have. The number one thing you need to work on is to have an exact plan before you even go to the forge.

 

 

I have to disagree with this somewhat. An exact plan before starting is an "engineering type approach" I often start a project with a blind eye to where I’m going and just follow along with wherever the project takes me. I'm always suprised and sometimes quite nicely by what turns up. This is a valid approach. Making knives can be an art as much as anything else. Following a muse and seeing where it leads is what creates those things that really speak to us. Precision however is best learned by following a set plan. All depends on what your trying to achieve.

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I have to disagree with this somewhat. An exact plan before starting is an "engineering type approach" I often start a project with a blind eye to where I’m going and just follow along with wherever the project takes me. I'm always suprised and sometimes quite nicely by what turns up. This is a valid approach. Making knives can be an art as much as anything else. Following a muse and seeing where it leads is what creates those things that really speak to us. Precision however is best learned by following a set plan. All depends on what your trying to achieve.

 

I agree and disagree both. First the knife starts in your head, not in the forge. If you cannot make it on or with paper you cannot make it in the forge and sure as heck cannot produce a finished product that meets the standards most of us are trying to achieve.

 

I do agree that following someone else's exact pattern while it may be difficult may not get the creative juices flowing. That said just hitting hot steel and hoping for a knife, even a masterpiece, is just wishful thinking. If you're just messing around its fine, trying something new, no big deal. If you are going for serious work you need a serious plan including having all you're materials and methods ready before you even light a match.

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If you cannot make it on or with paper you cannot make it in the forge and sure as heck cannot produce a finished product that meets the standards most of us are trying to achieve.

 

...You've obviously never seen my attempts at drawing. :lol: If I were limited to making stuff that looked as awful as what I draw I'd have quit years ago! ;)

 

I do, however, have it in my head very clearly. Even when I'm just "doodling" at the forge, letting the steel go where it seems to want, there has to be some guidance. I feel like one should be able to make exactly what is intended before allowing the steel to do what it wants. Only then is it art rather than lack of skill. B)

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...You've obviously never seen my attempts at drawing. :lol: If I were limited to making stuff that looked as awful as what I draw I'd have quit years ago! ;)

 

I do, however, have it in my head very clearly. Even when I'm just "doodling" at the forge, letting the steel go where it seems to want, there has to be some guidance. I feel like one should be able to make exactly what is intended before allowing the steel to do what it wants. Only then is it art rather than lack of skill. B)

exactly

there is a fine line between creation and destruction

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Bryan, I'm with Alan on this. I can't sketch worth a darn; I find stick figures challanging. I start with a picture in my head and and beat on the steel until it takes the shape of what I'm thinking about. Some times I can't get the steel to do what I want and end up changing the design at the anvil. Some times I screw up grinding it but I'm able salvage the blade with a quick modification. This could be one of the reasons that I forge my knives.

 

Bob, steel sellection is a very individual thing. Each steel has it's advantages and disadvantages. W2 is a good steel, but then again, so are 1084, D2, 9260, 440C, and a whole bunch of others. Some are easy to forge, some are better left to stock removal. My advice is to choose a steel or two and learn them. Some basic steel metallurgy is very helpful but not mandatory; you can learn to cookbook the process.

 

W2 is a high carbon, low alloy steel that is shallow hardening. In the text books it is listed as a simple alloy with 60-140 points of carbon and a little vanadium. Count on it having something closer to 85-100 points. Also most of the W2 will have other eliments in it beyond the usual traces. Expect some tungsten, chromium, and silicon. There's also a good chance that there was some aluminum used to deoxidize (kill) the steel during the smelt.

 

The high carbon content means that it has more carbon in it than can be disolved in the austinite (hypereutectic). This makes a harder, stronger, and more wear resistant steel in all the conversion products of austinite. This has to do with the formation of carbides in the steel. It also contributes to the loss of toughness and ductility because it prevents the formation of ferrite outside of pearlite/bainite and smaller plates/strands of ferrite within the pearlite/bainite.

 

Being hypereutectic also means that you have to be a little more concerned about grain growth even though vanadium and aluminum can counter the effect to an extent. Don't get all that hung up on grain growth just keep you heat down when you austinize to heat treat and normalize X3 to help correct for the grain growth that may occure during forging.

 

Being shallow hardening steel, though the actuall composition of the steel influences this characteristic, W2 has some advantages. This factor restricts the thickness to which you can harden a knife blade. It can automatically give you a soft spine and contributes to the formation of a hamon.

 

Sorry if I got a little too technical with you but I'm a technical type of person. Remember, you don't need a course in steel metallurgy to make blades, you can get by with learning the forging and heat treating characteristics of the steel that you choose.

 

Doug :ph34r:

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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A lot of times I just go to the forge with a rough idea and start forging a blade. One the blade is heat treated and polished out part of the way I'll lay it on some paper, and trace the blade then design a handle around the blade.

 

I've got a few I drew the whole thing out I'm eager to get around to making though. I've not done a lot with the idea fully drawn out to start with.

Beau Erwin

www.ErwinKnives.com

Custom knives

Bcarta Composites

Stabilized Woods

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Nice hamon and blade. Would like to see the walnut and buffalo horn handle. :)

 

I cannot make a knife if I don't see the final product and how it will be put toghther in my head. I find that if I just make the steel do what it wants...it will take control of me... rather than me taking control of it. My best friend (Norman Hackney) who also forges blades at my workshop also lets the hammer and anvil do the thinking for him when forging a blade...I simply cannot. I always draw what I'm going to make on the whiteboard in my workshop.

 

Maybe it has all to do with the personality of the smith, but that means I am a control freak :P

 

Nice work, I always love a hamon on a blade!

Francois Labuschagne

Web: http://www.iforgeblades.co.za

Mobile: +2782 358 0221

Skype: fralab9

Email: fralab9@gmail.com

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