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Inspired by the Himalayan Imports Tiger Killer Knife


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I own a Tiger Killer Knife from Himalayan Imports, and for some time it’s inspired me to do something along the same lines.

 

As always, the steel is from an old, concrete-cutting saw blade. I made the guard out of blued cast iron, and the two-toned handle is mahogany and (appropriately) tiger maple, which I shaped into a flared octagon, using mostly files and sandpaper. I secured the hidden tang with a pin I made out of a drill bit.

 

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Overall length is 13":

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Here it is, next to the HI Tiger Killer Knife. I don't have the mirror polish that HI puts on their knives, and I decided against putting the extra cutting edge along the spine. I'm also a little short of water buffalo horn and bone :rolleyes: , so I opted for the two-toned wood handle.

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If you go to this page, and scroll halfway down, you'll see that my HI Tiger Killer came with the other guard (on the knife with the upswept tip), which didn't have the strange shape to it. I wanted to put the oddly shaped guard on this one:

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The U-shape in the back allows the user to put his thumb on the spine:

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Final shot:

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Thanks for looking.

Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who did not.

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Very nice! How did you go about HT? Did you like the results of your HT? I ask because I have concrete blades I was gonna toss.

 

Rod

"As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another" Proverbs 27:17

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Very nice! How did you go about HT? Did you like the results of your HT? I ask because I have concrete blades I was gonna toss.

 

Rod

 

Rod,

 

I've found that I haven't had to normalize or anneal the steel I get from the concrete saw blades. I have a theory that it's already at a desired state from the heat treatment(s) it originally received at the factory, and then from cutting concrete while being sprayed with water. In any event, it cuts well enough and gives way under files well enough, and I've never had an issue after final heat treatment.

 

I have one of the Tim Lively washtub forges I use for the final heat treatment. I get it to non-magnetic hot and quench it vertically in a standing pipe of vegetable oil. After cleaning up the blade so I can see the steel again, I draw temper it on hot coals, getting a purple/black on the spine and a straw color toward the edge.

Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who did not.

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Cool! I'll have to give that a try sometime. Thanks!

 

Rod

"As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another" Proverbs 27:17

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