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Making of a sheffield knife


Sam Salvati

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A video with horrible audio on the making of a sheffield knife. Look at that guy HOG on that wheel :D. Note the cutler's anvil, an ORIGINAL cutler's anvil with different tools dovetailed into the top, and HT'ing two at a time :D

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nRAzwgJWMF0

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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heheheh anyone have any whale oil around? I like the grinding wheel, I just can never seem to find anything in that size around....

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just use common sense.......dude your boned

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I've never seen one like that. I wonder if they custom-built cutlers anvils based on what the 'smith wanted, or maybe with production of certain knife types in mind? I've seen several different shapes and sizes while looking for them on the web.

 

The small bench anvil towards the end of the film is a "Cutlers Stiddy", or that's what the Brit's seem to call them anyway. I made one out of railroad rail and cut the vertical slot on the end with a razor wheel.

To realize that you do not understand is a virtue; Not to realize that you do not understand is a defect.

-Lao Tzu

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2. blades were made one after another using a single, long bar of steel, so thickness was usually fairly consistent from one piece to another. grinders were very skilled and able to adjust any variation in thickness. i'm not aware of a jig being used - these men would usually grind, eyeball it, grind, eyeball it, etc until they were satisfied. any other minor variations could be corrected by the cutler during assembly.

This is a definition I have not seen before. I always assumed that "Cutler" was simply a name for a Smith that specialized in dinner-ware. But if this guy is correct in his description, it seems that the designation of "Cutler" would be the person who does the final "fit and finish" work.

 

I guess in a one-man shop though, 'Smith or Cutler would both apply...

Edited by Sean McGrath

To realize that you do not understand is a virtue; Not to realize that you do not understand is a defect.

-Lao Tzu

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I like the drill what uses in 4:14. Do anybody know more about that drill? I want to make one for me :)

 

It's called a Bow drill. There should be lots of information about them online, I'll look later. :)

 

 

 

And Sean, "cutler" does indeed apply only to the fit-and-finish guy. A cutler is/was not expected to make the blade, just to put a handle on it and polish it up.

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And Sean, "cutler" does indeed apply only to the fit-and-finish guy. A cutler is/was not expected to make the blade, just to put a handle on it and polish it up.

Then I guess we're bladesmith and cutler rolled into one. That probably would have gotten us kicked out of the Guild back in the day... ;)

 

 

 

Edit: And I guess that means that the bladesmiths anvil, and the cutlers anvil are two totally different things, although several of the odd shaped anvils I've seen referred to as cutlers anvils on the web looked more like the one the 'smith is using at the beginning.

Edited by Sean McGrath

To realize that you do not understand is a virtue; Not to realize that you do not understand is a defect.

-Lao Tzu

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Here I find some information about it:

http://takeadip.tripod.com/id16.html

 

Thank you for naming. :)

 

It's called a Bow drill. There should be lots of information about them online, I'll look later. :)

 

 

 

And Sean, "cutler" does indeed apply only to the fit-and-finish guy. A cutler is/was not expected to make the blade, just to put a handle on it and polish it up.

New email: hloh.noze@gmail.com

 

New blog: http://knivesbyhloh.blogspot.cz/

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If you like the bow drill, you (especially you, Hloh!) will also want a Parser. It's a tool used to carve a shaped recess for inlay work. Somewhere around here there is a link to a video of one in action, but here's a link of pictures and words:

http://www.watchman.dsl.pipex.com/two-legged%20parser/parser.html

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the general purpose cutlers anvil seem to be quite a common feature of these old clips from around europe and eastern europe. they make sense .

 

sam have you ever thought of compiling all the clips you have found into one "library" on the net ?

here are some very similar anvils I saw at the tool museum in troyes france, these are specifically for file making , however the first looks identical to a cutlers anvil I have seen being used in another of sams clips.

I have a block of mild steel and some appropriate H13 to make one of these up but have so far lacked the time , for a lot of what I do like making crossbow prodds and the like a sequential specific tooled up anvil would be perfect.

5736420838_cdb40ea5d3_b.jpg

5736420834_68bb968a17_b.jpg

forging soul in to steel

 

owenbush.co.uk

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Obviously you bring it in person, and Owen pays the fare + freight. ;)

I brought 90 pounds of steel as a carry on 16 years ago...took a small wheeled luggage dolly and put the steel in a cardboard box...I bet you can't do that today.

 

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

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I took 53 pounds of 15n25 in two bags (Owen took care of the second bag charge), since the current weight limit is 50 lbs per bag lest you incur the $150 overweight charge. :rolleyes: And the carryon limit is 75 lbs.

 

TSA tore the boxes apart (but they did leave a lovely note), even though the boxes did clearly state what they were. Odd x-ray opacities tend to incite suspicion these days indeed.

 

Hmmm... A 74 lb slotted anvil as carry-on with the tooling packed in your checked bag, and Owen still foots most of the bill? ;)

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If you like the bow drill, you (especially you, Hloh!) will also want a Parser. It's a tool used to carve a shaped recess for inlay work. Somewhere around here there is a link to a video of one in action, but here's a link of pictures and words:

http://www.watchman.dsl.pipex.com/two-legged%20parser/parser.html

 

I have made ​​a my own parser ;)

I still have to make a better bow, this was just to try.

 

1.jpg

 

2.jpg

 

I will make even the drill..

Edited by Hloh

New email: hloh.noze@gmail.com

 

New blog: http://knivesbyhloh.blogspot.cz/

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Well 1st I...oh the other one. :lol: Thanks for the vid Sam!

My life is like shaving with a razor sharp machete. It's a bit awkward and I feel a sting every now and then, but in the end I'm happy with the results.

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Hloh, you make me happy. :D

 

 

Me too, very happy.

Let not the swords of good and free men be reforged into plowshares, but may they rest in a place of honor; ready, well oiled and God willing unused. For if the price of peace becomes licking the boots of tyrants, then "To Arms!" I say, and may the fortunes of war smile upon patriots

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