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Bandsaw blade will not cut 1095 ? ? ? ? ?


Steve Holloway

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Well the long awaited blade making process was delayed until tonight.

 

I had purchased a Bi-metal Olson Band saw blade, 1/2 inch .025 guage Reg Raker. Made sure it was on the right direction!! Turned it on, yep lined up and ready to go. Marked off my blade on the steel and went outside, safety glasses on and hit the switch. Tell me what Im missing here! It was like me rubbing it woth glass.

 

Will not even make a scratch on it. YES IT IS THE RIGHT DIRECTION.

 

Do I need to take the steel and heat it and let it cool slowly to lose its temper if it has any? Im totally shocked it wont even hardly scratch the rascal!

 

HELP!

 

Steve

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OK... went back out and looked it over again, definitely on the correct direction, im not a newbie wood worker for sure the blade is correct. The blade states on the box 1000 degrees on blade edge. I grabbed a piece of wood, poly carbonate, magnesium and aluminum and the plastic and wood it cut but wouldnt even make a 1/32nd scratch on the magnesium and aluminum.....

 

Grabbed my 2 dollar hack saw blades and placed it in the vise, pissed and throwing stuff you can imagine, laid the blade up and the first stroke took it down like butter, so I went ahead and cut across this 5/32 x 2.0" piece of flat stock. Now Im really ticked. Im going to research where I got the blade from and I think it was a cat on scambay. This is ridiculus 40 bucks shot! Might have touched the steel with the blade and pressure like 3 -4 seconds. BLADE IS ON CORRECT DIRECTION!

 

I wish I had a forge Im ready to hit something now! LOL Cant flintknap rock is too delicate!

 

Oh well... I guess Ill wait again!

 

STEVE

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Is it a woodworking band saw or a steel cutting band saw that you're working with? Sorry if the question is a little basic; just want to establish what we're talking about here.

 

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Steve,

I use band saw blades that that are made of M2 ... they are exspensive but work good with annealed carbon steel... I get them from MSC supply...

 

Yes you do need to anneal your steel before trying to cut it with a band saw... The cheapest way to anneal is to have a bucket of wood ash to put your steel into . I use a two big pieces of steel the will fit in my wood ash bucket... they are an inch thick ... I put the steel I'm trying to anneal in between the two "heat sinks" and heat them all up to1450 then place them all in the bucket of wood ash and leave to cool... The object is to cool down the steel you want to anneal as slowly as you can... You can put just the blade into wood ash but I find it works much better if you

use a a large extra piece along with the blade to retain the heat and so cool down slower...

 

I usually do this at the end of the day and but the next morning my blade is still to hot to pick up with my bare hands... I have measured it at just above 200 degrees just to see what it was...

 

 

this method of annealing works good for the plain carbon steels like 1095 w1 w2 O1 ect., when you get into the exotics like air hardening and stainless ect. annealing becomes much more complicated and you will need an annealing oven with ramp settings...

 

and before you use your saw blade on your freshly annealed steel you should remove the fire scale from the surface where you are going to cut , either by grinding or soaking in vinegar overnight.... fire scale will destroy a new bandsaw blade...

 

And if you don't want to wait to do this process you can use a angle grinder with one of those .045 cut off abrasive wheels and not worry about annealing to begin with...

 

 

also you didn't mention what kind of band saw or if your band saw runs SLOW .... if you are using a wood working band saw the speed is way to fast for metal cutting... and will toast the blade pretty quick.

 

Dick

 

Dick

If you are going to do any hand work or drill the tang it is better to have your steel annealed ....

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The only bandsaw blades I'll use anymore are the Lennox Diemaster II. They last nearly forever and will cut nearly anything, annealed or not. I've had cheaper blades that dulled after an inch of 1/4" mild steel, and some that stripped all the teeth on annealed 15n20 without more than scratching the edge of the steel.

 

How thick is your 1095? Gotta have at least three teeth in the cut to avoid stripping teeth. I like 20-24 TPI variable pitch for most things, but I keep a 10-14 on hand for the heavy stuff.

 

The Lennox blades are around $25 each for a 64.5 inch blade from MSC. I wouldn't buy anything that had to be quality off eBay. Life's too short to get ripped off. Took me a few times to figure that out. ;)

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I think my Bandsaw might turn too fast! So if thats the issue , gonna have to start the physics and calculus books back up to slow it down. The person I purchased it from also had the same info, needs to be slow speed or it will toast the blade. Shoot! Oh well live and learn, I guess thats why portabands run slow!

 

Thanks and I will anneal this sucker too. Thanks will read it all over again slower before I take another step!

 

STEVE

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A steel cutting band saw runs at about 1/10th the speed of a wood cutting band saw. There have been some conversions discussed on these boards in the past but they all seem to agree that it's probably better to purchase a steel cutting model than to spend the time and money to rig pulleys, move motors, and build cabinets. Some of the Port-A-Band type models have stands designed for them to convert them into an upright saw or you could just buy a horizontal/vertical saw. In the end they probably run about the same to convert a hand held or to buy a cheaper hroizontal/vertical model.

 

Doug

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HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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Because of the way the hack saw cut the 1095 I would believe that it is already annealed and probably softer than you will be able to get it.

I have had customers buy a VFD and 3 phase motor from me and use that to convert a wood band saw to be able to cut anything.

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Wayne Coe
Artist Blacksmith
729 Peters Ford Road
Sunbright, Tennessee
706-273-8017
waynecoe@highland.net
www.WayneCoeArtistBlacksmith.com

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Steve,

and for what is is worth the portoband blades are .020" thick.... which can be very nice sometimes... and is the same thing with poraband blades , buy the most expensive ones you can find...

 

Dick

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On my portable on a base,I've tried Every blade from Harbor frieght to Starrett...The Best is Morse. JMHO,of course

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover." — Mark Twain

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Hey Steve, the others are pretty much spot on here. I don’t know how large your band saw is but the surface speed of the blade is very important when cutting metals. The harder (or tougher) the metal the lower speed you going to run (generally). To be safe with whatever blade material you’re working with I would recommend about 50-75 SFM (Surface Feet per Minute). There are 2 more things I’d like to point out though. The TPI on the blade you are using must allow for constant contact with the material. Ideally you would have 3 teeth in contact with the material at all times, but if your cutting very thin stock this may not be practical. The other thing is the speed at which you feed the metal into the blade. Metal cutting band saws use hydraulics or pneumatics to regulate the feed of the blade into the material. When feeding by hand it is important to keep a steady pace (especially when dry cutting) to avoid work hardening. This isn’t so bad with annealed 1095 but if you ever cut stainless or an air hardening steel use even pressure all the way through and don’t stop till you’re done... or you will be.

 

Surface Feet is calculated by taking the RPM of the drive wheel and multiplying it by the circumference.

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Something that might help next time...

Before cutting, drilling, or filing on a hot-rolled bar of steel, first remove the mill-scale... don't try this with your belt grinder, it will eat up a ceramic grinding belt just as quickly as it will ruin a drill bit. Soak the steel in ferric chloride for 30 or more minutes, then use a wire brush (preferrably powered) to remove the scale. Vinegar works too, but needs a longer soak (like overnight).

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George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


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