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Not quite there, blade still needs to be heat treated and tempered, then hand rubbed. I will be leaving the flats with a forge finish. The top edge will be sharp.

 

The blade is flat ground L6, 3/16" at the plunge with a distal taper to the tip. The handle is white oak burl, with oval black walnut overlays. Copper guard is oval shaped and has been textured throughout.

 

Hope yall enjoy, will be posting completed pictures shortly.

 

Thanks for looking,

 

Brandon

 

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"A country boy can survive" - Hank Williams Jr.

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Well done! Finished knife will be worth seeing!

Troy Allen Christianson is NOT a "Licensed Bladesmith" so you may treat his posts with the contempt they deserve.

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Looking good!

-----------------------------------------------

"It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; because there is not effort without error and shortcomings; but who does actually strive to do the deed; who knows the great enthusiasm, the great devotion, who spends himself in a worthy cause, who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement and who at the worst, if he fails, at least he fails while daring greatly." -- Theodore Roosevelt

http://stephensforge.com

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Thanks for your kind words.

 

Brandon

"A country boy can survive" - Hank Williams Jr.

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That looks pretty good.

 

I was offered a large White Oak burl not too long ago, but I turned it down because someone had told me that the tannins in Oak react badly with steel. Did somebody give me bad information, or do you have to stabilize it to be able to use it?

To realize that you do not understand is a virtue; Not to realize that you do not understand is a defect.

-Lao Tzu

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From what I know, and I may be wrong, there is no problem using oak, burl or no burl. One piece small enough for a handle couldn't possibly effect the steel, in my opinion. Not to mention the tang will be surrounded by epoxy creating a barrier between the wood and steel, so there will be very little, if any direct contact. I would not hesitate using it again in its raw state, with no stabilization. Not saying the person that gave you the information is dead wrong, because I simply have no proof either way.

 

If you were able to, I would go back and accept the offer. This wood is very hard and dense, but in turn it finishes like glass. You also cannot argue with it's beauty, my pictures cannot do it justice.

 

Thank you for your interest.

 

Hope I have helped in some way.

 

Brandon

"A country boy can survive" - Hank Williams Jr.

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Well, I went out in the shop a little while ago with an interest in doing a wire inlay somewhere on the handle, so I had at it.

 

Since it is my first attempt at this, I went with 1/8" copper wire, doubled it up and twisted it, then "forged" it square with a 6 oz. hammer.

 

Everything was going well up until this point. I drew my centerline on and started filing and chiseling with some needle files and a tiny chisel I made for fine detail work such as this. What I didnt notice until after nearly finishing is that I had wandered off to one side, maybe 1/16".

 

So, I come to you with a question. Should I just leave it as is, or should I file it away? It wont affect the handle profile other than maybe slimming it up 1/8" or so. Please, offer your opinions and reasons why it should, or shouldnt stay.

 

 

Thanks,

 

Brandon

 

 

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"A country boy can survive" - Hank Williams Jr.

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I ground out the inlay and then re-sculpted the handle and finished up contouring the belly side. The handle is sanded to 320 grit with a quick coat of poly on it. Now it just needs to be sanded with progressively finer grits and might get a nice buffing after final assembly.

 

 

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"A country boy can survive" - Hank Williams Jr.

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I think I like the new handle better than the original. Can't wait to see it when it's all done.

Kristopher Skelton, M.A.

"There was never a good knife made from bad steel"

A quiet person will perish ~ Basotho Proverb

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More updates:

 

I heated up the blade to a very low red and textured the ricasso in the same manner as the guard. I have one side of the blade taken to 150 grit, with a light buff to help see all the scratches I still have to remove. I plan on getting both sides to atleast 220 grit tonight. My shop hours have been short and very late because of this extreme heat. I have no A/C or fan so I have to wait for the temps to drop down to something somewhat tolerable.

 

Thanks for looking,

 

Brandon

 

 

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"A country boy can survive" - Hank Williams Jr.

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I assume you haven't heat treated the blade yet? If you haven't, then good job. If you had, then you would still need to again after heating. Most likely I just missed it, though.

 

I am glad you fixed the handle. Some things I make, they are mostly just for the process of making them. I call them "test" pieces (like the copper bolstered one I posted recently). Others are meant to be "complete." The one you are making is obviously a "complete" piece even though you are testing new skills. It looks very good. I am glad that you took the wire inlay off of the handle. It looks much better, and you would always know it was there.

 

nice work.

kc

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

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have to wait for the temps to drop down to something somewhat tolerable.

I know exactly what you mean. I do most of my work in the spring and fall because of the humidity here. Late summer isn't too bad though, August is usually dry heat, and I can deal with that.

To realize that you do not understand is a virtue; Not to realize that you do not understand is a defect.

-Lao Tzu

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Kevin: I have yet to heat treat the blade. Still trying to get it hand rubbed to a fairly high grit all around before heat treat so there is no chance of any stress risers. I am also pleased with the handle, the inlay was a bad idea to try on this knife, especially since it was a first time thing and I am well experienced with all other tasks. Thank you for your comments.

 

Sean: It has been over 102 here every day this week, not to mention the heat index. It is still 80-85 degrees at 10 pm. Its just simply rediculous. I hate the cold but I'm starting to miss it. Hah.

 

Thanks for commenting.

 

Brandon

"A country boy can survive" - Hank Williams Jr.

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