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Low layer damascus Bowie


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Here is my second attempt at damascus. It is 10 layers of 1080 and 15N20 with a loose twist. The guard is made of the same bar. The Handle is of York Burl.

Specs are

Overall length 13 3/8

Blade length 8 1/2

width 1 3/8

 

 

handle and guard closeup.jpgobverse profile.jpgquartered down.jpgreverse profile.jpg

 

My one issue with it is the "blotchiness" of the metal. When etched there are patches of lightness. I've cleaned several different ways; alchohol, acetone, MEK, soap and water, ammonia. All resulted in the "blotchiness" I'm thinking maybe its in the heat treatment? Some patches of steel at a different state of change? Any ideas?

 

I went ahead and finished it up as it was. I can brush it down with steel wool and the blotchiness is not visible. I really like the darker look of it though, so I may leave it as is. These photographs really highlight it as well. Either way, here it is for review and critique.

Edited by jarrett

CUSTOM KNIVES BY JL RHODES

JLRKNIVES

 

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God bless you. I thank God every day for the freedom to spend time with those I love, and time to pursue this craft.

 

"Adversity is a test for strong men."

"What one man can do, so can another."

"NO excuses, just do better next time."

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OK. So I couldn't take it. The patches looked hap hazard and they weren't intentional so I had to get rid of them. I rubbed the blade down with a finishing pad. Here are the updated pics. I'm much happier with this.

 

obverse profile.jpgreverse profile.jpgtop profile.jpg

CUSTOM KNIVES BY JL RHODES

JLRKNIVES

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

God bless you. I thank God every day for the freedom to spend time with those I love, and time to pursue this craft.

 

"Adversity is a test for strong men."

"What one man can do, so can another."

"NO excuses, just do better next time."

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Call me simple, but I like the zebra-stripe style of random/ladder pattern. And I like the rubbed knife better. Thanks for sharing this!

Kristopher Skelton, M.A.

"There was never a good knife made from bad steel"

A quiet person will perish ~ Basotho Proverb

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the last rubbing makes a good difference. What is a "finishing pad?"

 

nice shape and the welds all look very good, too.

kc

please visit my website http://www.professorsforge.com/

 

“Years ago I recognized my kinship with all living things, and I made up my mind that I was not one bit better than the meanest on the earth. I said then and I say now, that while there is a lower class, I am in it; while there is a criminal element, I am of it; while there is a soul in prison, I am not free.” E. V. Debs

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Damascus is fine, but good knife-craft ALWAYS should come first!! That includes knowing how to hand finish. That "splotchiness" you referred to was very likely surface decarb that needed to be eliminated. Good; you figured that out!

As well, know that low layered patterns require a much higher level of finishing prior to etching, as there are larger open areas that retained scratches can be noticed; whereas higher layer counts will obscure them to some extent, especially if the steel pattern is running in the same direction as the scratch patterns from whatever abrasive you're using. Look at a LOT MORE knives my friend. Broaden your understanding of what it is you personally like.

You're down in AK, a hotbed of bladesmithing activity; Connect!

Go over the lines of your piece shown here; compare them to others you like in a similar vein.

Notice what you see. Then Slow down!!!! Less is more...

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Thanks to all for the comments and input. I really like the low layer counts. This happened sort of on a whim. I had forged out a bar into 1 x 1 and then decided to twist it just to experiment. I've recently been reading Jim Hrisoulas' book and am anxious to put into practice what he has recorded. I'm also reading more about damascus here, since I'm dabbling with it now.

 

The pads I'm using are a Norton product; a nylon mesh abrasive pad. I believe I got them from Mcmaster Carr in two grits; clean / finish and finish. They seem to work better than steel wool, less mess and can be cleaned and used several times over. Here is the link. They are inexpensive and work really well for this application and several others. They are inexpensive as well.

 

Here is the link. http://www.mcmaster.com/#catalog/117/2660/=cv7c06

CUSTOM KNIVES BY JL RHODES

JLRKNIVES

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

God bless you. I thank God every day for the freedom to spend time with those I love, and time to pursue this craft.

 

"Adversity is a test for strong men."

"What one man can do, so can another."

"NO excuses, just do better next time."

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