Jump to content

Celtic fibula tutorial


Jiří Javůrek

Recommended Posts

Hello! I was asked to make a tutorial about forging Celtic fibula, so when Petr was here we made some photos of me forging it.

So here it is - Celtic fibula tutorial

DSC00348.JPG

 

I chose fibula inspired by find from Duchcov, Czech Republic

duchcov.jpg

 

I chose to forge from about 7 mm thick round stock of mild

 

first you have to draw a pin an spiral part to thin stick and make nice and smooth transition

DSC00281.JPG

 

Then you meassure the lenght of the fibula bow and forge the begining of the future hook, where the pin will lock

DSC00284.JPG

 

For perpendicular fullering i used these tools

DSC00264.JPG

 

Fullering in action, its nice to have a striker for that

DSC00289.JPG

 

Piece all fullered

DSC00291.JPG

 

Then you use hardy cutter and wooden mallet to execute thin grooving

DSC00292.JPG

 

Here it is done and the pin holder is elongated

DSC00295.JPG

 

to be continued

Edited by Jiří Javůrek
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pardon my ignorance but what exactly is a Fibula? Awesome forge work too!

Edited by Matthew Lomas
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, excellent smithing skills.

 

Please keep us posted with your progress.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks a lot, and here we go!

 

with wooden mallet, i make the bow of the fibula on the horn of anvil

DSC00297.JPG

 

and then you start to wind the spiral. In la tene period both directions were used

DSC00302.JPG

 

i bend the pin under the bow to form second half

DSC00306.JPG

 

and wind other part of spiral

DSC00309.JPG

 

after that i arrange two halves to be in axis and adjust them, using axle

DSC00313.JPG

 

time to take care of other end

DSC00323.JPG

 

the point is forged and decorative grooving added same way as before

DSC00328.JPG

 

and bend it to gracefull shape

DSC00336.JPG

 

setting the pin holder

DSC00343.JPG

 

and finished with small ginger brother forged earlier that day

DSC00359.JPG

 

 

i hope you enjoyed that

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i hope you enjoyed that

 

:blink: Thank you, Jirí, I did indeed enjoy! I apologize I can't find the ASCII code for the accent on the "r" in your name, but WOW! :ph34r: That's some forge skill! Thank you for showing.

 

Is the ginger one perhaps bronze? They both look like scorpions, in a good way. B)

 

I bow AND tip my hat in your direction!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jiri,

 

I agree , very cool ... fun to see... I liked the first shot while it was still in heat.... Good forging chops you have developed!!!biggrin.gif

 

Thanks for posting ...I learn something new ... tongue.gif

 

 

I like the cut out on the hardy hole end of your anvil also ... I've never seen one like that....

 

Dick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Excellent forge work sir!

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

RelicForge on facebook
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jiri,

 

I have heard it said before that a good indicator of a smiths' ability is to forge small items. You, sir, are a very skilled smith.

 

On an entirely different note - would one of you Administrator types please sticky this and consider moving it to the History section?

 

~Bruce~

“All work is empty save when there is love, for work is love made visible.” Kahlil Gibran

"It is easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them." - Alfred Adler

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very good..very good

 

"PS: small fibula is copper. JIří is short of forgeable bronze "

Should I send you some forgeable silicon bronze Jiri? Maybe a bit of nickel bearing pattern-weld as well?

 

I looked into fibula when a metals student at the Univ...did not do anything like what you are up to though....

 

Ric

Richard Furrer

Door County Forgeworks

Sturgeon Bay, WI

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very nice and great work!

NEC SINE MARSIS NEC CONTRA MARSOS TRIUMPHARI POSSE(Appiano 146 a.C.)

 

 

www.americanknives.it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi

I'm sorry that I have little to show now.

He had a lot of work here and in the evenings I am building a press.

I thank everyone for the praise much you appreciate her.

As Peter wrote Floriánek so small that the fibula is of copper.

Richard Furrer thank you very much for offer bronze, I would definitely like to buy a piece.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

I have always wondered about the size of the "pin" part of the fibula and brooches particularly some of the Irish penannular ones), did they have eyelets in their clothes or were they of a courser weave, or how did they have some other way of avoiding tearing their garments?

Edited by Ben Potter

Ben Potter Bladesmith

 

 

It's not that I would trade my lot

Or any other man's,

Nor that I will be ashamed

Of my work torn hands-

 

For I have chosen the path I tread

Knowing it would be steep,

And I will take the joys thereof

And the consequences reap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I have always wondered about the size of the "pin" part of the fibula and brooches particularly some of the Irish penannular ones), did they have eyelets in their clothes or were they of a courser weave, or how did they have some other way of avoiding tearing their garments?

 

Ben (et all)

If you are thinking of some of the later 'presentation' Irish brooches, the scale is absolutely enormous. Many are easily the size of your palm. But those pieces are for an entirely different purpose - which is a kind of 'dig me' display of portable wealth. Something as huge as the well known 'Tara Brooch' would likely have been worn down your back (!)

 

Generally there is a very wide range of quality to early hand woven textiles. (My information tends to be Viking Age, but I am married to a weaver!) There are very few surviving samples of cloth from Northern Europe, often just scraps. The thread counts do range from fairly course weaves - up to extremely fine wools and linens. Some as high as 200 threads per inch! One curious link is that some of our information about textiles comes from impressions left in the corrosion on the inside surfaces of bronze and silver brooches. This where the oxidation products have encased the original threads from the cloth the jewellery was initially attached to. (I have never specifically looked at comparing pin diameter to weaves - but I'd bet you could do that!)

 

So it would be safe to say that 'it depends' might be the most accurate answer to your question. A cloak might easily be a much courser weave, and is the more likely place to use many of the larger brooches seen in the artifact record. It might also be a case of carefully working the pin into place on the fabric - then leaving it in place. People certainly owned far less 'stuff' in any pre-industrial society. These forged (and cast) brooches would be unique presentation pieces - not part of a larger wardrobe of possible jewellery choices (like we would use today).

 

Interesting work!!

 

Darrell

website: www.warehamforge.ca
Blog : http://warehamforgeblog.blogspot.com
(topics include iron smelting, blacksmithing, Viking Age)

NOTE : Any posted comments may be converted into a future blog article!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have always wondered about the size of the "pin" part of the fibula and brooches particularly some of the Irish penannular ones), did they have eyelets in their clothes or were they of a courser weave, or how did they have some other way of avoiding tearing their garments?

I've always wondered about this, especially those times when I am putting on a cloak at fair. The thought I've had is that all it would take is a small "button hole." I think if it were ever possible to go back and see what people were wearing and the way in which it was worn - we would all be in for some surprises!

 

~Bruce~

“All work is empty save when there is love, for work is love made visible.” Kahlil Gibran

"It is easier to fight for one's principles than to live up to them." - Alfred Adler

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...