Jump to content

A plethora of Frontier knives & sheaths


Wild Rose
 Share

Recommended Posts

Not up to typing much so I'm just gonna let the pics mostly speak for themselves.....I blew a fourth disc in my low back about a month ago and the %$@#!*(!&%# pain has been bad even with some drugs and such....then there's been the heat most days have been 95-100° F for the last 6 weeks and at 7,000' ASL that's HOT!

Plus it's 3:00AM.........

A collaboration with Bladesmith: Jerry Rodri of 9 Tongs Forge…

 

9roses-2011-mgrant-01-1.jpg

 

9roses-2011-mgrant-01-4.jpg

 

 

Wild Goo 29 – Bladesmith Tai Goo ………..

 

wg-29-1.jpg

 

wg-29-2.jpg

 

wg-29-3.jpg

 

Sometimes the end of the antler just looks great by itself

wg-29-4.jpg

 

The above two are convertibles sheaths – they can be worn left or right handed

 

 

Copy of an original Southwest belduque by bladesmith Joe Delaronde

sh-fr-2011-laclair-bel-3.jpg

 

sh-fr-2011-laclair-bel-1.jpg

 

sh-fr-2011-laclair-bel-2.jpg

 

 

I used thread for the "braid work" on this one – the knife is by maker C Matteo of Michigan

sh-fr-2011-Laclair-2-1.jpg

 

sh-fr-2011-Laclair-2-2.jpg

 

And last but not least a couple more Wild Goos….blades by Tai

wg-10-1.jpg

 

wg-10-2.jpg

 

wg-10-3.jpg

 

wg-10-4.jpg

 

wg-10-5.jpg

 

wg-10-1.jpg

 

wg-30-1.jpg

 

wg-30-1.jpg

 

Buenas noches...........

Chuck Burrows

Wild Rose Trading Co

chuck@wrtcleather.com

www.wrtcleather.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chuck,

I like your sheaths.... Nice worktongue.gif

 

I like that Delaronde Dirk tootongue.gif

 

Sorry about your back... Hope you don't have to go under the knife... I had a similar injury and it took months to get back on my feet.. But it does heal eventualy..

 

Thanks for the picsbiggrin.gif

 

Dick

Link to comment
Share on other sites

alway a treat to see your work ( and collaborations ) !!!

 

everything looks so good ! wow

 

the bead work and that folded ribbon stuff on the cases, blows my mind

 

thanks for the peek

 

Greg

 

ps.. very sorry about the back injury ... take care, and hopefully the doc's can fix it !

Link to comment
Share on other sites

those are the most stylish and well done knives I've ever seen in that style. They all have that truly genuine period look and feel. That sheath work is just too cool!Best I've seen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Outstanding work, they scream authenticity...

 

Rest up and get well.

George Ezell, bladesmith

" How much useful knowledge is lost by the scattered forms in which it is ushered to the world! How many solitary students spend half their lives in making discoveries which had been perfected a century before their time, for want of a condensed exhibition of what is known."
Buffon


view some of my work

RelicForge on facebook
Link to comment
Share on other sites

those are the most stylish and well done knives I've ever seen in that style. They all have that truly genuine period look and feel. That sheath work is just too cool!Best I've seen.

 

 

That's because Chuck is THE guy in that style. B)

 

Sorry to hear about the back, Chuck, that's a major downer. :(

 

I'm seriously diggin' on that belduque, though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Extremely well done Chuck. Most of my family were, and some still are, into the Blackpowder/Rendezvous/Primitive scene, and traveled all over the place doing it. I've seen a whole lot of your type of work, and you're definitely one of, if not the best that I've seen at it.

 

Sorry to hear about your back as well. Don't put it off too long like I did though, because after a point, there is nothing more they can do. All they can do to mine now is fuse all of my lumbar vertebrae together, then after that heals up, cut me open again and perform a Laminectomy on whats left of my spine. At this point, the failure risk is too high, and every specialist I've talked to refuses to do the surgery unless I start displaying symptoms such a paralysis in my legs.

To realize that you do not understand is a virtue; Not to realize that you do not understand is a defect.

-Lao Tzu

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks folks - both for your generous comments and for your concerns - As for my back, I've been dealing with it for close to 30 years now - original injury I blew 3 discs in my low back and 2 in my neck. After 10 years of heavy pharma drugs I "fired" the doctors and worked on it myself by using exercises, accupressure, and homeopathy - I will always hurt a bit now and again but at least I'm not walkign around in a brain fog. As for surgery - I won't let them unless it gets much worse, everyone I have ever known that had it just got worse over time and that's a bunch of different folks. Not saying there's not a time and place for it at times but mine would have to be MUCH worse to go that route.

 

To add to things though last night a skunk sprayed his life out just behind the house! YUUUCK! - Wouldn't be so bad if it wasn't 100° out there during the cleannup! Oh well that is life!

Chuck Burrows

Wild Rose Trading Co

chuck@wrtcleather.com

www.wrtcleather.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Absolutely amazing work, Chuck! Quite inspirational. There's a guy who wanted me to make him a native styled knife, and I've been going through hundreds of design ideas in my head and on paper (native designs aren't my style) and I haven't like any of them. I think you just help point me in the right direction. Thanks man! :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great looking stuff! I especially like the quillwork. I have a question about the sheaths with incised designs. They look like rawhide, but are they veg-tanned leather? Again, they all look great.

Edited by Bud Gayhart
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Absolutely amazing work, Chuck! Quite inspirational. There's a guy who wanted me to make him a native styled knife, and I've been going through hundreds of design ideas in my head and on paper (native designs aren't my style) and I haven't like any of them. I think you just help point me in the right direction. Thanks man! biggrin.gif

 

Jon - thank you and here's some info on period frontier knives and sheaths:

Here are some places to start researching the actual knives and sheaths of the American West pre-1899.

- "Fur Trade Cutlery Sketchbook" - has scale drawings of knives well dated from the 1500's to the 1800's – a real cheap source

 

- "American Knives, The First History And Collector's Guide"

Harold L. Peterson

 

- "The Knife In Homespun America And Related Items"

Grant, Madison

 

- "American Primitive Knives 1770-1870"

Minnis, Gordon

 

- "The Bowie Knife Book"

Norm Flayderman

 

- "Bowie Knives and Bayonets of the Ben Palmer Collection"

Ben Palmer

 

- "Bowie Knives"

Robert Abels

 

- "Early Knives & Beaded Sheaths of the American Frontier"

John Baldwin

 

- "Peacemakers"

R. L. Wilson

 

- "The Skinning Knife"

M. H. Cole

 

- Firearms, Traps, and Tools of the Mountain Men

Carl P Russell

These are just a start and some may be out of print so use your local Interlibrary Loan to obtain them: there are many other books on the general time period/subject one chooses (i.e. Rev War, Mtn Man, Civil War) as well with several or maybe just one or two knives included, magazine articles, auction catalogs and websites (e.g. Cowans, Apache Junction, Butterfields, Greg Martin, etc., museum catalogs and websites

e.g. BBHC.org - http://old.bbhc.org/...m?method=byMake

Splendid Heritage - http://www.splendidh...com/nindex.html

Autry Nat'l Center - http://collections.t....exe?request=ks

the AMNH - http://anthro.amnh.o...orth_public.htm

etc. all have good examples of actual period knives & sheaths and IMO are worth the time spent searching.

 

Some recommendations and thoughts on building period knives:

 

I'm a firm believer that when making a period repro to use the materials and methods used in the past as much as possible when possible (on the other hand I have NOTHING against using some power machines because while our tools of today are different, power tools of various types similar to those used today were used).

Also if you're interested in making actual period knives do the research and cross reference as much as possible with period resources. Be aware also that many vendors of perod knives call there products by period knives (i.e. scalper) and yet are nothing like the originals. Ones choice in making period knives can also include those pieces inspired by originals, but not actual copies and "fantasy" pieces - a non-derogatory term used by makers for those pieces that have a period look, but are more based on the imagination of the maker rather than actual works of the past. All choices have their own legitimate place in the grand scheme of things, but fantasy pieces (and I make them as well as replicas) should IMO be so noted.

 

1) Blade steels: based on a couple of dozen metallurgical tests done on period blades I've read over the years as well as steel making info from the "day", the most common steel used is most closely imitated today with one of the 1065-1070-1075-1080 simple hi-carbon steel series. The blades tended to be thin and were mostly through hardened not zone hardened and generally much softer than is the norm today. Tested blades go Rockwell C from the mid-40's (most of them) to the mid-50's. I prefer a bit harder dependent on the usage to around 56-58 RC.

 

For those unable to make their own blades from scratch for whatever reason or who choose to use a commerically built blade. BTW - A knife maker using blades made by some one else (factory or custom made) is in fact period: Samuel Bell, a premiere maker of very recognizable Bowies had blades made in Germany, as well as Michael Price, famed maker of San Francisco Bowies, also imported knives as well as blades to use on his own knives

 

2) Handles were most often made with natural materials, although Gutta Percha, an early type of "plastic is appropriate:

 

1) Wood: maple, walnut, Indian rosewood, mesquite, and ebony are some of the period woods used. What type of wood to use will depend on the type of knife along with where, when, and by whom it was made. i.e. An English made bowie or butcher knife will not use mesquite or maple unless it was re-handled, a not uncommon situation.

 

2) Antler: Red stag, Sambar stag (Culpepper and Co is a good source at a reasonable price for Sambar), elk, whitetail deer, moose, and mule deer are all represented on existing period knives.

 

3) Bone: Just about any kind was used and some was "jigged". Deer, bison, and cow are just some documented examples.

 

Chuck Burrows

Wild Rose Trading Co

chuck@wrtcleather.com

www.wrtcleather.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great looking stuff! I especially like the quillwork. I have a question about the sheaths with incised designs. They look like rawhide, but are they veg-tanned leather? Again, they all look great.

 

Bud -

they are rawhide which can be incised while still damp. Incised carving on rawhide was used both here in the Americas as well as in early Europe as a decorative element.

Chuck Burrows

Wild Rose Trading Co

chuck@wrtcleather.com

www.wrtcleather.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

is in fact period: Samuel Bell, a premiere maker of very recognizable Bowies had blades made in Germany

 

It's rare I can offer any info to Chuck :o , but here I can say with some certainty that Bell didn't get blades from Germany. He did, however, get entire knives from Sheffield, England, made to his pattern and stamped on the blade "Samuel Bell / Knoxville, Tennessee" ;) I don't think he ever actually touched one of them except maybe during the sale thereof. :lol:

 

The Bell replica available from CAS is a copy of a damaged Sheffield Bell (cut down guard, pierced pommel nut, and badly reground tip), in fact.

 

But yes, most of the big names who were primarily silversmiths, etc. did import blades and entire knives to sell under their own names.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...