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matt ross

small japnese knife?

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i have seen small utility knives that go in the side of the saya on some katanas. what is it called and is there any site with information about them somewhere?

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i have seen small utility knives that go in the side of the saya on some katanas. what is it called and is there any site with information about them somewhere?

 

It is called "kogatana". I googled it and found a surprising number of reads on the subject. The little handle is called the "kozuka". What specific information do you need? Maybe I can point you to an appropriate site.

 

Shannon

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It is called "kogatana". I googled it and found a surprising number of reads on the subject. The little handle is called the "kozuka". What specific information do you need? Maybe I can point you to an appropriate site.

 

Shannon

 

 

i dunno. jus general stuff cuz i sorta wanted to make one as a side project.

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Hi. I did a lot of research on these some time ago, everyone here was very helpful, but it seems the Kogai and Kozuka are a bit of a mystery. No one seems to know for sure what they were used for. I have heard many possible uses: The Kogai: a comb, a kebab stick for roasting meat, a needle for bleeding horses. The Kozuka: An eating knife, a throwing weapon, a pen knife, a blade for bleeding horses, a ceremonial knife. The fact is, no one knows and it would seem that they have become purely asthetic additions to the sword. One thing is for sure, they were not used as weapons. The Kozuka's handle is held in place by the blade being bent into a curve, and pressing into the inside of the handle, i.e. purely by friction. The kogai is usually made from a single, solid piece.

 

Somebody did a Tutorial on making a Kozuka handle a while ago, I think it may have been Ford Hallam, but I may be wrong. I will see if I can find it amongst my data.

 

If anyone spots any mistakes in what I have said above, please correct me, as it has been a while since I did the research.

 

Regards

Wayne

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Hi. I did a lot of research on these some time ago, everyone here was very helpful, but it seems the Kogai and Kozuka are a bit of a mystery. No one seems to know for sure what they were used for. I have heard many possible uses: The Kogai: a comb, a kebab stick for roasting meat, a needle for bleeding horses. The Kozuka: An eating knife, a throwing weapon, a pen knife, a blade for bleeding horses, a ceremonial knife. The fact is, no one knows and it would seem that they have become purely asthetic additions to the sword. One thing is for sure, they were not used as weapons. The Kozuka's handle is held in place by the blade being bent into a curve, and pressing into the inside of the handle, i.e. purely by friction. The kogai is usually made from a single, solid piece.

 

Somebody did a Tutorial on making a Kozuka handle a while ago, I think it may have been Ford Hallam, but I may be wrong. I will see if I can find it amongst my data.

 

If anyone spots any mistakes in what I have said above, please correct me, as it has been a while since I did the research.

 

Regards

Wayne

bleeding horses?

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I know Lee, they weren't my theories B)

 

Matt, i am not sure why, because I know very little about horses, but the Samurai felt it neccessary to cut a vein in their horse's neck and let it bleed for a while, every now and again. The process was non-lethal. The "Umabari" that Lee refers to translates as "Horse Needle" as far as I know.

 

I have not had the chance to check my files for the tutorials yet.

 

Regards

Wayne

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I know Lee, they weren't my theories B)

 

Matt, i am not sure why, because I know very little about horses, but the Samurai felt it neccessary to cut a vein in their horse's neck and let it bleed for a while, every now and again. The process was non-lethal. The "Umabari" that Lee refers to translates as "Horse Needle" as far as I know.

 

I have not had the chance to check my files for the tutorials yet.

 

Regards

Wayne

DANG SAMURAI YOU CRAZY. :P

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