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Good day everyone,

I'm working on a 4 bar Tanto. The core has an upper spine of 1020, the edge is 1095 with everything sandwiched between 2 pieces of 1095.

During the finishing I've ground through the outer jacket on side "A" for most of the blade length and exposed the inner core which shows a nice neat weld line where the 1020 meets the 1095.

The weld looks great but this isn't what I intended. If I finish the piece by grinding the jacket from side B to match side A, will the blade be structurally strong enough (assuming the weld is sound)or have I built another piece for the scrap bin?

Thanks,

Michael

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If I finish the piece by grinding the jacket from side B to match side A, will the blade be structurally strong enough (assuming the weld is sound)or have I built another piece for the scrap bin?

Thanks,

Michael

I would sat yes, is should be strong enough (of course one could ask, strong enough for what?). I've not seen this method used in the Japanese tradition, but in the European patternwelding tradition one very often sees a low-carbon body with a high-carbon edge section fire-welded on...

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Michael,

 

I think the best way is to try it out ... Mistakes are the best teachers of all... sometimes mistakes also turn into something worth

 

pursuing... and any amount of practice just adds to your experience.. smile.gif finish it and test it to destruction.. you will learn more than

 

you may think

 

Dick

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"...the European patternwelding tradition one very often sees a low-carbon body with a high-carbon edge section fire-welded on..."

George Ezell, bladesmith

 

George, thanks for the info and reminding me of traditional European practices. I'm encouraged by your reply. The lack of cladding seems to be an issue of esthetics

Thanks again.

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".....any amount of practice just adds to your experience...finish it and test it to destruction.. you will learn more than

 

you may think...." Dick

 

Dick,

My first impulse was to chuck it simply because it was not what I intended but I'm definitely finishing it for the practice.

Destruction testing is very much on the table as an option. I won't knowingly a sell mechanically flawed piece but I'm getting a bit of pressure from certain people in my life to "practice" the "experience" of actually selling something :)

Thanks Dick

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Michael,

 

resist those prompts to experience selling somethingcool.gif.... until YOU make something you think worthy of putting your name to... the first time you sell your work

 

is a big rush... There is nothing like having somebody like you work enough to put money down on it... there comes a time when you complete a knife and think you did

 

pretty good... maybe you could do better the next time.... and that is something even the best makers feel... but you know the "mistakes " are acceptable to you...

 

this is a fine line between what you can over look and that which is too obvious to your eye as being a "mistake" and that line will always move upward as your chops

 

improve...

 

People will judge you by what you make... you don't need to be flawless . nobody is... but at the same time you don't want to create poor impression of your work

 

by putting out stuff that looks incomplete.. people love being in on watching someone improve... and many will not buy a knife from you till you improve to their

 

level... So it is important to get stuff out there even if you know next time you can do better cause some like to see that improvement and commitment to your work.

 

finding that place where it is "good enough" is an individual choice... and should be made by you and you alone... when that first sale happens some day you'll feel ten feet tall ...biggrin.gif

 

Dick

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Michael,

 

resist those prompts to experience selling somethingcool.gif.... until YOU make something you think worthy of putting your name to... the first time you sell your work

 

is a big rush... There is nothing like having somebody like you work enough to put money down on it... there comes a time when you complete a knife and think you did

 

pretty good... maybe you could do better the next time.... and that is something even the best makers feel... but you know the "mistakes " are acceptable to you...

 

this is a fine line between what you can over look and that which is too obvious to your eye as being a "mistake" and that line will always move upward as your chops

 

improve...

 

People will judge you by what you make... you don't need to be flawless . nobody is... but at the same time you don't want to create poor impression of your work

 

by putting out stuff that looks incomplete.. people love being in on watching someone improve... and many will not buy a knife from you till you improve to their

 

level... So it is important to get stuff out there even if you know next time you can do better cause some like to see that improvement and commitment to your work.

 

finding that place where it is "good enough" is an individual choice... and should be made by you and you alone... when that first sale happens some day you'll feel ten feet tall ...biggrin.gif

 

Dick

 

 

Dick

I agree with what you've written...been my thinking for years

I didn't mean to give the impression that I'm a complete newbie. Sold my first blade while in high school in '83.

Back then, prior to the internet, the available info was more or less heat to cherry red, quench, and temper to a straw color. Not exactly a complete recipe for producing what I consider to be a decent hand made blade. And your so right, people certainly will judge you! Just try asking your high school shop teacher for help in building a blade :o

 

I wasn't happy with most of the few dozen blades I produced. Some were given as gifts and some were sold and the few who've spent money on my blades were pleased even if I wasn't because the blades were "cool"

 

For many years I did no smithing at all as I found bituminous coal to be too obnoxious to work with. But the compulsion to play with fire and steel is so strong!! I've slowly built my collection of good tools. A few years ago I built a vertical pipe forge, primarily for welding, but I use it for everything. It's based on Don Fogg's pipe forge plan (thanks again Don for all the great info!!) but modified in a few ways. The big difference is that it runs with a 1" venturi burner from Rex Price. This welding forge has been a key piece in my return to smithing.

 

Regarding the current blade, it is no longer a Tanto, it is now a "Viking Seax" :) when it's completed I'll post some pics in show and tell as well as some photos of the partial destruction testing done to the Kissaki while the blade was still a Tanto.

thanks again Dick

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