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quench tank question


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Well, sooner or later you will dropped a piece while above the melt point of the plastic. If your quench is water, no problem, a mop can get it up. However, if it is oil.. at best it is a mess to clean up. At worst, the fire department puts it out. Buy yourself a metal bucket at Ace or Home Depot.

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I got a turkey frier on sale to use as a quench tank. I can warm the oil in it and it holds enough to be able to quench 3-4 blades without worrying about the oil becoming too warm. An electric roaster can be used for edge quenching or quenching the whole blade edge first. I use one for austempering. One could also be used for tempering blades.

 

Doug

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In the unlikely event that your oil catches fire (assuming you're using oil), a metal bucket with a lid can easily contain and smother the fire. Plastic could be more of a problem.

 

That said, I once accidentally dropped a big chunk of bright orange leaf spring into a 5 gallon bucket of water. It did not melt through the bottom. Leidenfrost effect, I assume. (It did ruin the steel.)

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Basically been said above, but another method is to get those metal coffee cans, cut the bottoms out (and remove the tops) and affix them end to end. I used a whole bunch of J-B weld (you can do anything with that stuff) which keeps them watertight. Then, just leave the bottom on on the bottom can and you can theoretically make a quench tank as large as you feel like making.

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I edge quench most all of my blades,and recently I started using an old steel toolbox.Its just a little deeper than your basic everyday cheapie tool box.Holds close to 4 gallons or so.I just welded some legs on it to raise it up.And youve got a built in hinged lid too.

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I've got an old stainless sink that I use for quench oil, I put a short piece of pipe and a valve on it for dumping the oil back into a 5 gallon fuel can for storage. For water quenches I use a galvi feed pan. Next to forge I have a 5 gallon plastic kitty litter bucket, but if you drop a big piece of red hot steel into it, it makes a mess.

 

Geoff

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I have a friend who, among other things, strips old cars down and sells them for scrap. As the gas tank has to be removed, he has an impressive pile of old gas tanks behind his shop... to make a long story short, I found a long narrow one and after several rinsings and some creative chisel work ended up with a quench tank long enough to edge-quench a 4' sword in, should the opportunity ever arise...(I suspect it could easily hold 10 gallons of oil, though I usually use just 1 gallon and tip it up a bit so it is deep enough)

 

Be creative, there are many things that will make a good quench tank. I do suggest it be metal, not plastic (Which melts) or glass (which can break). I also suggest having a metal lid that fits snuggly, in case the oil catches on fire it can easily be snuffed out with a metal lid.

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