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simple way to hold abrasive paper for polishing


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Hello Everyone,

Like most or many, I have had trouble with keeping abrasive paper flat against a hard backing for polishing without rolling my lines too badly.

 

Here is one way that is dead easy!

 

Get sticks of the purple children's glue that looks like a big marker or tube of lipstick.

 

Get yourself a hard backing (I use a small bar of steel that I have polished flat, corian, micarta, tempered glass, all work great).

 

Cut your strips of paper just a little wider and about half an inch longer than the backing.

 

Put a good coat of the glue on the backing. Take the overhang of abrasive paper at the end (the half an inch) and fold it around to the back of the steel or corian or whatever. Then, push the paper in and smooth it down against the glue really hard and remove any air bubbles.

 

This will hold, even if you use windex for cutting fluid. You may want to grab somewhere along the paper with the hand that is providing the force, and hold the paper looped around the back with the other hand. It doesn't slip, and gives a nice, hard backing. It will also peel right off, every time.

 

Finally, the glue itself cleans up really easily with windex or amonia so it is not problem with getting everywhere.

 

 

This turns any good bar of scrap that is about 1" wide and 10" long into an "abrasive file."

 

My thumbs wish I had found this method a long time ago.

 

hope this helps,

Kevin

Edited by Kevin (The Professor)
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Kevin,

I use almost the identical method, taught to me by Jim Turecek during the hand made knife course he does 2x a year. I forget where in CT he does it, at a tech school out by the shore but, anyway........

I use a 1"x 1/4x 8" piece of G10, smooth on one side, ridged from the saw cut on the other for when i want it to bite a little harder and its the only way to go for me. As for adhesive i use this 3M spray stuff, spray it on the G10 every now and then and the paper goes on and off.

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I just went to the paint section in the hardware store and picked up a sanding block. you just wrap a piece of sand paper around this hard plastic wedge, and there's a locking mechanism that the paper tucks into on top on both sides, and you just tighten a wingnut on the back... Much like this picture if you follow this link! Maybe we're talking about for different uses, but either way, this lil guy was a godsend for me for only a dollar.

 

http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/sandpaper-1.jpg

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Shawn - yeah, I tried the 3M spray but I had a hard time not sticking the paper too well to the backing. This stuff doesn't stick quite as strongly, and works better for me. Other people may like the better grip.

 

Danespaulding - I tried those a long time ago. They are too big to get into small places on blades and too soft. To keep your lines crisp you really need stones. Paper on anything is a "second place" option. The harder the thing behind the paper, the better it will leave your lines. Trust me, I tried the sanding blocks from hardware stores and all sorts of rubber and leather backing. Those are good when you are not as concerned about getting a truly flat surface (sometimes you just want to polish inside the existing hills and valleys of a surface instead of level them off). Rubber and leather are great for those times (like at the end of polishing something with a hamon. the last grit you use backed by something hard first, but then several etches and passes backed by something soft like rubber, sponge, your hand, leather...).

 

this, of course, is just what works for me. Your results may vary.

kc

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Shawn - yeah, I tried the 3M spray but I had a hard time not sticking the paper too well to the backing. This stuff doesn't stick quite as strongly, and works better for me. Other people may like the better grip.

 

Danespaulding - I tried those a long time ago. They are too big to get into small places on blades and too soft. To keep your lines crisp you really need stones. Paper on anything is a "second place" option. The harder the thing behind the paper, the better it will leave your lines. Trust me, I tried the sanding blocks from hardware stores and all sorts of rubber and leather backing. Those are good when you are not as concerned about getting a truly flat surface (sometimes you just want to polish inside the existing hills and valleys of a surface instead of level them off). Rubber and leather are great for those times (like at the end of polishing something with a hamon. the last grit you use backed by something hard first, but then several etches and passes backed by something soft like rubber, sponge, your hand, leather...).

 

this, of course, is just what works for me. Your results may vary.

 

 

kc

 

I wrap my paper around a flexible corked back stainless steel ruler.That way I get a really flat side and one that gives somewhat

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  • 2 weeks later...

Kevin,

I've been doing the same thing, only I use a 1"x1/2" x10" aluminum bar, with one long edge rounded for the plunge area before the ricasso. I figure if I do something stupid, which is very likely, the aluminum is softer then the knife steel. Only difference is I've been using double sided tape. I'll have to try this adhesive you suggest.Sounds easier then the tape. Thanks.

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