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Andy Davis

TOOL STEEL FOR SALE

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Hey everyone, just got sent this from a friend in an email today. Looks like some interesting stuff. Does anyone have any more information on this type of steel? what would it's use be? quench? ect? Thanks, Here is the LINK

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Hey everyone, just got sent this from a friend in an email today. Looks like some interesting stuff. Does anyone have any more information on this type of steel? what would it's use be? quench? ect? Thanks, Here is the LINK

 

A bit like AEB-L from Uddeholm. (sandvick 13C26 is the direct match to AEB-L)

that is a good price on stainless.

 

It will make a knife.

 

Ric

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A bit like AEB-L from Uddeholm. (sandvick 13C26 is the direct match to AEB-L)

that is a good price on stainless.

 

It will make a knife.

 

Ric

 

 

That said, how "stainless" is it? Unfortunately I have no experience working with stainless (exclusively use 10xx steel) but have been looking for better option. Would this be a decent stock removal steel for medium size blades?

Also what type of surface does it have? will it take patina? or does the finish act like 440C? More importantly, how do you heat treat it?

I think i'd only be down for maybe two or three sticks, but looking at the prices makes me question giving up such a great deal :|

 

another question I had was, what is the forge-weld characteristics of this stuff? can it be fused to 52100 or some equivalent?

 

Thanks for your reply Ric.

 

 

 

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here' the Sandvik data and heat treat info on 12c27. Admiral sells this, although they don't list .183

 

http://www.smt.sandvik.com/en/materials-center/material-datasheets/strip-steel/sandvik-12c27m/

 

If you purchase the lot, I could use a piece.

 

 

J

 

also - Verhoeven in "Metallurgy of Steel for Bladesmiths & Others

who Heat Treat and Forge Steel" thinks this is a better blade steel than 440C

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

John D. Verhoeven

Edited by JDWare

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it's a great blade steel, for stainless - compared to a good carbon steel, not so much, at least with low tech h-t. you won't get an optimum heat treat with a home set-up, but it is still perfectly possible to make a decent knife out of it, it just won't be quite up to what this steel is capable of.

 

i assume it's as forge weldable as any other stainless, as in not very, but with sealed edges it should work, but i dont see much point in using it for san mai, as this steel only becomes stainless after hardening, and the hardening temp would destroy a 5160 core.

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will it take patina?

 

Thanks for your reply Ric.

 

 

Andy,

did you just ask if the corrosion resistant steel like this would corrode for surface effect?

But..its STAINLESS!!!!... that means it never corrodes right? :rolleyes:

 

 

There are plenty of guides out there for this steel from Sandvik and I think it will work well for most knives. you would be best to use salt pots to heat treat.

Using it as welding stock may prove problematic unless you are good at welding such things.

I think it would be far better than 440C...for several reasons...lower carbon for one..which is GOOD in this case.

 

As to how corrosion resistant it is..well..that is a tricky one...depends on heat treatments and how you work those temp numbers...where the chromium gets bound up and all.

 

I will second the reference to Verhoeven's book on this...good book. A MUST have ..right up there with having a hand hammer and a forge.

 

Ric

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I recently lost a Bark River knife made from 12c27 outside for a few months. When found, the steel bolts holding the scales on had to be scrapped, they were heavily corroded, but the blade itself only needed a run with the cork belt to clean up. Plenty of light surface stuff that didn't have any penetration, there was absolutely zero pitting.

 

 

Otherwise, I've used this knife for a couple of years as my main small trail knife, and I beat the ever living crap out of it. I'm a pretty big fan of this steel (with the caveat that I've never HT'd it myself, only used BR's HT on their blade, so YMMV) for a knife that needs to be highly stain resistant but easy to maintain an edge on in the field.

 

Haven't worked with this steel myself yet, although I have been planning to acquire some. Bark River seems to have transitioned to CPM 3V and 154CM, although it could have more to do with supply issues than the steel itself.

Edited by Javan Dempsey

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