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first of all. it is Christmas. and second of all....well i wanted to make a suit of Armor. Now i don't know if this was quiet the right place to put this but.... it seemed somewhat appropriate considering most swords need a suit of armor, anyone know of any site? or information where to look?

 

please?

ill post some pictures along the way with progress :) might try to engrave a nice flowing pattern into it.

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Probably stainless or mild steel. thins sheet up to lower plate gauge. So anywhere from 1/16th inch to a little over 1/8th and I have a local steel supplier who can give me deals on many different steels and pieces. price isnt too much of a problem. unless i get into hundreds and hundreds.

 

Thanks for the interest :)

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Indeed, there are many, many types of armour, as many as there are makers, and what you use to make them has a large role in the cost of materials. Depending on the complexity, it might take you a while (and when I say a while, I thought it would be a good idea to make chainmaile from scratch, and it took six years, or thereabouts to complete) :blink:

 

I would start with an idea of the era of the armour and the region it is from, and find details from there.

If you intend to go the metal route, I have some experience in the aforementioned chain as well as segmented platemaile, and I would be happy to share any advice I can give in that regard. Some other things to consider are leather, scale, ringmaile, lamellar, brigandine, plate, banded, bone, hide/fur, splint, studded leather, etc., etc.

 

Keep in mind that it is Much easier to design something if you have a base idea in mind (and will probably turn out better too) ;)

 

Best of luck to your endeavour

 

 

John

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Probably stainless or mild steel. thins sheet up to lower plate gauge. So anywhere from 1/16th inch to a little over 1/8th and I have a local steel supplier who can give me deals on many different steels and pieces. price isnt too much of a problem. unless i get into hundreds and hundreds.

 

Thanks for the interest :)

 

If you are looking for ideas and tutorials on how to make your own armor check here: http://www.armsandarmourforum.com/forum/ They have a great deal of information that should point you in the right direction.

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Ah, another glutton for punishment. :D You've got a wide selection of options to go with. Try starting out with some books on the subject and narrow things down. You can do a suit of plate, jacks of plate, briggendines, penny coats, all sorts of stuff. This could lead to a real obcession.

 

Doug

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Well i thought since this is 2011....I thought i could make it a bit more, modern :P something like http://media2.playstadium.dk/img/kbj/nyheder/army.jpg

 

The face mask that the man on the left is wearing. I know there is copies of this already. but never in metal. I think I'm going with the close combat helmet style. Where it slides back onto itself.

 

When I make this helmet/mask, it will be in a few pieces because of the design. I will weld it together on the inside then clean it all up and add the detail.

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This is the exact opposite of my experience - I started with the Arador site back in the 90's, and wound up here, being more interested in historical technique and morphology... they said "go see the knifemakers, they do heat treatment all the time." Never really looked back.

 

Funny.

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  • 2 months later...

what the... 6 years for chainmaile from scratch!? WHAT, you making your own wire?

 

Chainmaile simplified.

Buy Rebar Tie Wire (its 14gauge mild rolled steel), Make a jig with something to roll the wire around in your preferred ring diameter, cut off as a "coil" (looks just like a spring)

Cut the wire down making individual rings.

took a week to make a hauberk, and that was during a school week in highschool.

also, my rings are smaller than commercial chainmaile rings

Edited by Eric Leonard
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Armor in its simplest form is in pieces.

Scale is the fastest to produce, only requiring a sheet of metal and some rings (use the aformentioned process above)

Lameller requires only some form of string and a sheet of metal.

And the next complicated, would be Banded.

If you need a descriptor, look up the "Wisby coat of Plates"

or just look at Lorica Segmentata (roman armor) ((Lorica Hamata is chain))

getting into solid pieces requires a dishing stump and some dies, not to forget a planishing method, whether it be a shop planisher or a hammer and mushroom stake.

thats if you want it smooth.

SS is the WORST armor to go with, not only do you need to anneal the bastard before you can work, and during work, its brittle. "hence why we NEVER EVER EVER make swords out of it"

Mild is the easiest to work with, you can heat treat "harden, temper" but its best that your metal armor is soft.

much easier to bash a dent out, then to rebuild the piece :D

start simple, say your forearms.

then make a dished cop (elbow or knee) then shoulder (spaulders or full on pauldrons)

the next piece i would make would be greaves (shins)

but the segmentation is how you want.

slot rivet

pivot rivet

leather suspension

the list goes on

Remember, armor is your safety harness, its what protects your life, dont take the "cheap" way out.

minimum armor i recommend is 14g. you can go thinner IF you heat treat, but I seriously wouldnt.

10g for your helm.

Plenty of guys in the Czech Republic are making armor.

armstreet is one who does quite a bit, and can do commission.

like a knife or sword, armor is left to your imagination.

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what the... 6 years for chainmaile from scratch!? WHAT, you making your own wire?

 

Not making my own wire, but everything else was done completely by hand. And I should say that by 6 years, I mean I worked on and off on it for 6 years, but not continuously. It took about an hour and a half per 10x10 ring square, including the time it took to make the rings (which are about half the size of most commercial chainmaile). That being said, I used around 17000 rings, made out of 2.25km/ 1.4mi of wire. In all, it came out to around 250 straight hours, but my hands could only take so much at a time -_-

 

...And it still needs sleeves

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Armor in its simplest form is in pieces.

Scale is the fastest to produce, only requiring a sheet of metal and some rings (use the aformentioned process above)

Lameller requires only some form of string and a sheet of metal.

And the next complicated, would be Banded.

If you need a descriptor, look up the "Wisby coat of Plates"

or just look at Lorica Segmentata (roman armor) ((Lorica Hamata is chain))

getting into solid pieces requires a dishing stump and some dies, not to forget a planishing method, whether it be a shop planisher or a hammer and mushroom stake.

thats if you want it smooth.

SS is the WORST armor to go with, not only do you need to anneal the bastard before you can work, and during work, its brittle. "hence why we NEVER EVER EVER make swords out of it"

Mild is the easiest to work with, you can heat treat "harden, temper" but its best that your metal armor is soft.

much easier to bash a dent out, then to rebuild the piece :D

start simple, say your forearms.

then make a dished cop (elbow or knee) then shoulder (spaulders or full on pauldrons)

the next piece i would make would be greaves (shins)

but the segmentation is how you want.

slot rivet

pivot rivet

leather suspension

the list goes on

Remember, armor is your safety harness, its what protects your life, dont take the "cheap" way out.

minimum armor i recommend is 14g. you can go thinner IF you heat treat, but I seriously wouldnt.

10g for your helm.

Plenty of guys in the Czech Republic are making armor.

armstreet is one who does quite a bit, and can do commission.

like a knife or sword, armor is left to your imagination.

 

"Mild is the easiest to work with, you can heat treat "harden, temper" but its best that your metal armor is soft."

 

Mild is the easiest to work, although you can't actually heat treat mild steel. Well you can case harden it, but I wouldn't consider that "hardening and tempering" and no, you don't want your armor soft. If you look at historic pieces, they were made from medium to high carbon steel and were heat treated to be like spring steel. Not brittle, but definitely not soft! Pretty much the same as a sword.

 

 

"minimum armor i recommend is 14g. you can go thinner IF you heat treat, but I seriously wouldnt.

10g for your helm."

 

What you have described here is SCA standards. Again if you look at historical pieces, most tend to be in the 16 to 18 gauge range. They didn't want to carry extra weight, so they made their suits out of steel that can be hardened unlike mild.

 

If you want reference on historical pieces go to http://www.armsandarmourforum.com/forum/ its an amazing source of info and knowledge

 

 

If you want to go to the site the reanactors hang out at go to http://forums.armourarchive.org/phpBB3/ you can learn a lot there but be aware, there is as much bad info on there as good.

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So Matt,

What is your armor for? If it's just for show, use the thinnest metal you can, or plastic. if you are thinking about something like that pic you posted, Thin sheet metal, should work just fine. As you will need to do quite a bit of shaping.

Do you have a dishing stump, or forming stakes, or big pitch bowl? You could form all that on logs if you do some practice.

I have made quite a bit of armor for SCA combat. But that is made to fight in, where your bones will break if your armor isn't right.

Show armor, for Cons, or LARP, Or something like that, just keep it light. It's a lot more comfortable to be in 15 lbs of armor all day, then 50.

Leather makes wonderful armor, but can be expensive. ABS plastic is nice as well, and if you learn to finish it right, it looks real from 5 ft.

 

Have fun!!!!

Mark

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"Mild is the easiest to work with, you can heat treat "harden, temper" but its best that your metal armor is soft."

 

Mild is the easiest to work, although you can't actually heat treat mild steel. Well you can case harden it, but I wouldn't consider that "hardening and tempering" and no, you don't want your armor soft. If you look at historic pieces, they were made from medium to high carbon steel and were heat treated to be like spring steel. Not brittle, but definitely not soft! Pretty much the same as a sword.

 

 

"minimum armor i recommend is 14g. you can go thinner IF you heat treat, but I seriously wouldnt.

10g for your helm."

 

What you have described here is SCA standards. Again if you look at historical pieces, most tend to be in the 16 to 18 gauge range. They didn't want to carry extra weight, so they made their suits out of steel that can be hardened unlike mild.

 

If you want reference on historical pieces go to http://www.armsandarmourforum.com/forum/ its an amazing source of info and knowledge

 

 

If you want to go to the site the reanactors hang out at go to http://forums.armourarchive.org/phpBB3/ you can learn a lot there but be aware, there is as much bad info on there as good.

 

You are oblivious to the Lorica Segmentata arent you? Conquered most of the world, and was soft. As was the Pilum. There are reasons to have either.

But none of this is any real point, as I was plainly putting out additional options, Ive made my fair share of armor mind you.

Its my preference to have softer, safer armor. yes, its heavier and thicker, but let me ask you, do you buy a cheap motorcycle helmet? or do you get overbuilt? Personally armor is safety equipment, and you cant put a price (or thickness) on that.

Correct me if im wrong, but werent the vast majority of munitions grade swords made of iron? steel being reserved for higher class knights and lords, thus, thinner steel for weaker iron, no?

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  • 4 weeks later...

I have learned the way....-_- the hard way that is. i tried to make anything in class. and whether i used hot steel or cold steel. acetylene torch on specific spots or drop it into a coal fire to heat the majority areas... it all failed. i ended up just finding a small bar of 4140 and I'm now making a hammer out of it.

 

Mark: I was going to use it for paintball/air soft, but it wouldn't work out.

 

Eric: I think I will start with basic and go to chainmaile, your right. if i cant make the small stuff then i definitely cant make the full on larger stuff.

 

The main point being... i need to concentrate on bladesmithing and get it relatively correct and so that I understand it, before i move onto other things. im making the hammer because i have no mid size hammers and the 4140 would be thrown out if not. Thank you all for the information :D it helps so much! and in a weeks time i might start making chainmaile! and add onto that skill until one day ill be able to make steel armor!

 

Like bladesmithing...if you cant make a railroad spike bowie. You wont get a Mad-Dwarf pattern welded sword the first time! :P

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Mark: I was going to use it for paintball/air soft, but it wouldn't work out.

 

I did tournment paintball(speedball/Xball) for years best armour for thats XXXXL shirts, and I'm not joking! Im 160 lbs and I wore something made for a 400 lbs 7 foot tall man :lol: The loose fabric catches the balls without breaking them and you wont feel it as much

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You are oblivious to the Lorica Segmentata arent you? Conquered most of the world, and was soft. As was the Pilum. There are reasons to have either.

But none of this is any real point, as I was plainly putting out additional options, Ive made my fair share of armor mind you.

Its my preference to have softer, safer armor. yes, its heavier and thicker, but let me ask you, do you buy a cheap motorcycle helmet? or do you get overbuilt? Personally armor is safety equipment, and you cant put a price (or thickness) on that.

Correct me if im wrong, but werent the vast majority of munitions grade swords made of iron? steel being reserved for higher class knights and lords, thus, thinner steel for weaker iron, no?

 

I'm well familiar with the Lorica, but that armor while efficient in its time, has been upgraded, and replaced many times over.

 

And while your on the subject of buying a cheap motorcycle helmet... That is almost exactly the same as buying, or making armor....although you are completely wrong in your analogy.

 

Motorcycle helmets are just like armor: The most expensive ones are made of stronger lighter material, being more protective, efficient, and comfortable at the same time. While cheap helmets, (like cheap armor) are made of less expensive material that is heavier and not as strong, such as mild steel, vs an alloy.

Edited by Saign Charlestein
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motor cycle helmets are heavy (cheep) or light (expensive) but if its dot or snell then they will all provide the same minimum level of protection in a crash which may include cracking like an egg if required to save your skull and they are also meant to be replaced after any impact as there ability to protect has or might have been compromised and it is your head after all

 

and the rebar tie i get hardens in oil wtf?

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Saign is pretty much right on. All the armour I've been able to handle has been hardened. The only pieces that have been "heavy" have been pieces made for the joust. Even those were incredible in that the metal was pushed around so that areas of high stress and impact ( left front side) have much more metal than areas that were less likely to be hit ( back and sides, right front side).

 

Anyway Mathew it's easy enough ( and cheap ) to just stick with mild steel. It moves like butter and if you went with anything needing hardening it may be overcomplicating what you're really looking for.

 

Steer clear of stainless for your own good. It's a pain to work ( literally)

 

Grant

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Working it hot helps. However Stainless just doesn't like to do some things. Like stretch for instance. So that making an exterior roll is incredibly difficult. It's easier to compress and roll to the inside.

I use it for small pieces like jewelry. But large pieces, no. It tears me up and tears up my stakes and hammers.

 

Grant

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