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Best way to learn is the hard way, right?


Sean McGrath
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Finally made my first sheath. Took me about four hours, but I was pretty happy with the end result.... until I realized I made it backwards. :angry: Oh, well. It's a Christmas present for my brother-in-law, so he can just get over it.

 

I do have a question though. How do you get the stitches to set flush? do you cut a groove along the line where the stitches will be, or use some kind of tool to pound a groove into it? Also, I just used a sharpie to color the welt-edge black, and what little "color" that the sheath has, is just from Neatsfoot oil. Will the Neatsfoot oil alone protect it, or was there something else I should have put on the leather first?

 

I also read on Wikipedia that Neatsfoot oil can contribute to oxidation of the leather, so should I be using Mink oil instead?

 

By the way, it's "Horse-Butt" leather, if that makes any difference.

 

 

 

DSC_0001websize.JPG DSC_0003websize.JPG

To realize that you do not understand is a virtue; Not to realize that you do not understand is a defect.

-Lao Tzu

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the tool your looking for is called a stitch groover .... does what its name says... got mine from tandy leather

- the neats oil just keeps the leather from getting stiff n cracky, so far as i know..

 

- the leather will darken up as you use it..

 

- mink oil works but it also loosen up the leather .... not sure what to use to protect it... i typically leave it as is

 

G

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Like Greg said to get your stitches to lay flat you can get a groover from Tandy mine is adjustable and fairly cheap too.

For the final finish I have been using Fiebing's acrylic reslolene (Tandy has this too), I have no idea what everyone else uses but I have had very good luck with this stuff.

Edited by Anthony C

"Work is the curse of the drinking class...." (Wilde)

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So does the groover actually "cut" the leather, or just emboss it deeply? If all it does is emboss it, I can make something like that myself.

To realize that you do not understand is a virtue; Not to realize that you do not understand is a defect.

-Lao Tzu

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A stitch groover actually cuts a thin strip of leather away to form a groove that allows the stitches to lay below the surface of the sheath and reduce wear on the threads. You can also use an over stitch wheel. It will first lay out the spacing for the holes to keep them even and after stitchinng you can run the wheel back over the stitching to press the threads down a little more. My suggestion is that you get a good video on sheath making. Chuck Burrows put out a great one. I have it and I highly recommend it.

 

By the way, you did a real good job on the stitching and the retention strap. I'm quite sure that you're not the first one to accidentally put the belt loop on the wrong side. I've never but I've come reeeeel close.

 

Doug

HELP...I'm a twenty year old trapped in the body of an old man!!!

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By the way, you did a real good job on the stitching and the retention strap. I'm quite sure that you're not the first one to accidentally put the belt loop on the wrong side. I've never but I've come reeeeel close.

Thanks Doug. I don't know my brother-in-law very well, they just got married a couple of months ago, maybe I'll get lucky and find out that he's left handed... :rolleyes:

 

 

Edit: For the spacing, I made a four pronged chisel-like thing out of some scrap 1095, then welded it into a slot in the end of a piece of 3/8" rod. Worked good for punching the holes, and keeping them spaced evenly, but it was a royal pain trying to pull it back out of the three layers of leather. About halfway through, I started just punching through the first layer, then driving through one hole at a time with a sharpened piece of 3/32" filler rod.

Edited by Sean McGrath

To realize that you do not understand is a virtue; Not to realize that you do not understand is a defect.

-Lao Tzu

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