Jump to content

power hammer styles


SonnyDuong
 Share

Recommended Posts

 

this is a video of a power hammer design i havent seen till now.

 

is there a name to this style and has any one ever used it before?

 

seems easier to make than others tho i havent thoroughly looked at plans for other types.

 

what kind of power hammers are out there?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That's a helve hammer, one of the very first types to be made. They existed as far back as the Romans with various power sources (human or water, usually), and were made in sizes as small as a few ounces for jewelry work and as large as a ton or more for heavy forging.

 

Any way you can think of to power a hammer has been used by someone somewhere. Everything from springs to rubber bands to hydraulics to pneumatics in every variation, and I knew a guy once who was thinking of using railgun or maglev technology just to say it had been done. :lol:

 

There's a book called "Pounding out the Profits" that gives a list of American power hammers along with pictures, dates of manufacture, and sometimes patent drawings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the Punkin Chunkers need a new type of chunker, MagLev!

 

Of the weirder hammers was one (which I don't think was ever built) which was a takeoff of a diesel pile driver. The head was lifted on a long shaft by a diesel explosion and the hit was gravity powered. The same guy thought that gunpowder could be made to work!

 

BTW

 

Pounding Out the Profits

By

Douglas Freund

 

Mingus Mountain Machine Works

P.O. Box 532

Jerome Az 86331

 

$37 total, direct from the author.

 

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A helve hammer would be the easiest to build I think. You can make it with easy to find materials and a 1 hp motor. Since the spinning mass isn't above your head, you don't need a really huge vertical frame like most of the Little Giant-style mechanical hammers or tire hammers. You could still use a tire for the clutch mechanism for simplicity.

 

As a side note, the glass test for quench hardness is interesting. I've never tried that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

this is a video of a power hammer design i havent seen till now.

 

is there a name to this style and has any one ever used it before?

 

seems easier to make than others tho i havent thoroughly looked at plans for other types.

 

what kind of power hammers are out there?

 

Brian,

A pneumatic hammer is quite easy to build, though that helve hammer has great visual appeal. What I found interesting (awkward) about this video is the mix of modern and "traditional" methods...if that was a TV show shop visit, I think a lot of opportunity was missed.

 

Jan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ow, Ow! Can I post the one I built?

 

Edited by nakedanvil

[font="Book Antiqua"][color="#0000FF"][size="5"][b]Perfection[/b][/size]

[i][size="3"]is achieved not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.[/size][/i][/color][/font]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ow, Ow! Can I post the one I built?

 

 

 

Grant,

I have seen that one at one of the ABANA conferences and liked the concept very much ( I think it was actiivated by a brake drum ). I am expecting someone sometime to try a disc brake caliper on a pivoting arm to crate a linear motion stroke from a rotating flywheel.

Jan

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i think he has the same tempering oven as me :D

The smith also sitteth by the anvil,

And fighteth with the heat of the furnace,

And noise of the hammer and the anvil is ever in his ears,

And his eyes look still upon the pattern of the thing that he maketh,

He setteth his mind to finish his work,

And waitethto polish it perfectly.

-Ecclesiasticus

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was Grants JYH project that convinced me to build my hammer, AbiYoyo. Just the idea that it could be done was enough to make me try. Mine is a #50 Champion style.

 

Hmr061.jpg

 

AbiYoyo is a Giant from an African story. When I first heard the name Little Giant, I had this mental image of a Blacksmith shop with a Giant crouching in one corner with a huge hammer in his hands. It's a scary place in my head, some days.

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Pretty nice Geoff! Humbling (and rewarding) to hear that I might have inspired you. Looks like you did a first rate job. LOL, you don't want to look in my head either! :blink:

Edited by nakedanvil

[font="Book Antiqua"][color="#0000FF"][size="5"][b]Perfection[/b][/size]

[i][size="3"]is achieved not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.[/size][/i][/color][/font]

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It was Grants JYH project that convinced me to build my hammer, AbiYoyo. Just the idea that it could be done was enough to make me try. Mine is a #50 Champion style.

 

Hmr061.jpg

 

AbiYoyo is a Giant from an African story. When I first heard the name Little Giant, I had this mental image of a Blacksmith shop with a Giant crouching in one corner with a huge hammer in his hands. It's a scary place in my head, some days.

 

Geoff

 

 

Nice hammer Geoff,

 

Where did you get your spring? Regular car/truck springs have the leaves get smaller on the outside of the curve for compression from the top rather than the inside like yours.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We unstacked a set of light truck springs. My Brother-in-law worked in a shop with a 300 ton press and we got him to re-work the curve on each spring, cold. We did heat and curl the ends of the long spring and left it as forged, no HT. I think we could have used the springs as the came to us (in terms of the curve), it would have made the toggle arms longer and changed the motion, but I have seen hammers like that work just fine.

 

AbiYoyo hits very hard (the dies are small, an engineering choice that I might have changed, given what I know now) for a #50 hammer. He has been in operation since April of 2000, with virtually no changes. One thing we learned was that the mid-19th century smiths were not rocket scientist or engineers, they were Blacksmiths with a mechanical problem to figure out. Once we looked at it that way, the hammer went together fast and worked from day one. I spent about $600 and about 100 man hours, including scrounge time.

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...