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"draw file finish"


Scott A. Roush
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I have a blade in which I want a draw filed finish. I've seen mention of swords finished that way for sort of a rustic look. But unless you go into the quench in a finished state... how do folks do this? Are there any carbide tooth files/rasps out there? I suppose a hand rubbed finish at a coarse grit approximates it enough...

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Just found this on ebay: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Tungsten-Carbide-Grit-File-Shape-Ceramic-Steel-Concrete-/320744258900?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item4aadd8fd54

 

Might as well give it a shot.. might save me money on the files I go through on guard fitting. But what will it do to my carbide liner on my file guide!?

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I have a blade in which I want a draw filed finish. I've seen mention of swords finished that way for sort of a rustic look. But unless you go into the quench in a finished state... how do folks do this? Are there any carbide tooth files/rasps out there? I suppose a hand rubbed finish at a coarse grit approximates it enough...

 

This sounds like you are asking how to file a sword after heat treat. A sword generally is tempered enough it can be filed without a problem. Or are you working on a knife that you plan on leaving hard enough a file won't work?

 

ron

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Although it's called a "file" being "grit" it's really a coarse abrasive stick. Smooth draw filing is done with a mill file and can give a very smooth surface especially if followed with a scraper (one-tooth file).

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well.. this is actually for a sword and I haven't heat treated it yet. This is my first sword (1075) and I suppose I wasn't thinking yet about much I would draw it back. My knives would typically be too hard for standard files. but.. yeah... I suppose swords are generally drawn back to a softer temper... Gotcha. Thanks for that.

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we posted at the same time...

 

sure... I draw file quite a bit and actually like it. I just normally do it before heat treat. But I often start with a coarse file and then go to the fine mill file. Haven't tried the one tooth yet though..

 

Seems like the tungsten thing should hog pretty well though! Anyway... I'm assuming I will draw back enough that my standard files should work...

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Scott,

 

If you are doing sword bevels by hand, I highly recommend you carefully read Don Fogg's tutorial: http://www.dfoggknives.com/handwork.htm

 

He has put on lots of sword making classes in which he teaches his hand shaping techniques, so they are tried, true and refined.

 

Although he spends a lot of time on Eastern blades, the techniques he uses are easily used on European blades as well.

 

Luck!

 

--Dave

-----------------------------------------------

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