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W2 katana with video


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but I am curious whether you're doing the final stage of polishing

as shown in Walter Sorrells on your video

do you own any other way

cause even as I polished katana

This stone, in 1500 I have a beautiful line Shinogi

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Latest firmware, but I do like polishing a paper in 2000

moving the blade from top to bottom

then this line is rounded

 

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with you and these lines are very sharp

and therefore I ask

 

yet I wanted to congratulate the wonderful workshop

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I was looking for a new hobby one day and was surfing youtube. I happen to see this video and was hooked. This is one of the most amazing things ive seen. You inspired me to start blacksmithing and making knives ect. Thank you for shareing your amazing work. I can never even think of being in your calibar but I love this and cant ever see me quitting. Thanks.

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When I use a modern steel like W2, I start with a 8-9" long round bar of 1 1/4" diameter. It never occurred to me to measure the weight. Out of that mass, I can get a 28" nagasa (length from tip to notch) katana that usually weights around 900 g or 2 lbs. With this type of metal the mass lost to forging is minimal and most of the lost is due to grinding. When using home-made steel (tamahagane), I start with a 5-6 lbs. raw metal bloom of which I loose 50% to carburization and compacting. Then I loose another 25% to forging and 10-15% to grinding. Add another 5-10% to final grinding to get a 2 lbs weight katana.

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When I use a modern steel like W2, I start with a 8-9" long round bar of 1 1/4" diameter. It never occurred to me to measure the weight. Out of that mass, I can get a 28" nagasa (length from tip to notch) katana that usually weights around 900 g or 2 lbs. With this type of metal the mass lost to forging is minimal and most of the lost is due to grinding. When using home-made steel (tamahagane), I start with a 5-6 lbs. raw metal bloom of which I loose 50% to carburization and compacting. Then I loose another 25% to forging and 10-15% to grinding. Add another 5-10% to final grinding to get a 2 lbs weight katana.

 

 

wow cool stuff thank you jesus.

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I'm afraid that this is NOT a katana. It is beautiful, yes, but beauty does not make the type of sword it is. A katana is several peices of metal made from irom ore sand named tamahagane. A kanta is a very, VERY intricate process that involves folding different peices of tamahagane with different carbonization levels together in a specific way. What I'm getting at is that you need to label your swords, knifes, hammers, WHATEVER you're making, CORRECTLY. I'm sure, at least I hope, you've gotten replys like this before. That said, it is a very beautiful peice of work and I encorage you to continue with pride.

 

Just remember; Even Monkeys fall from trees, so don't let mistakes stop you from doing what you love.

 

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Erik,

I find this a very odd reply to an effort and presentation most of us are grateful for........one of these day I will post what I think is a "Wootz" blade ..I am hoping you will not have any comments for me as well.

Why don't you make a real tamahagane katana and post it here.

Good luck and easy does it Erik.

Jan

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Eric, your post comes across as arrogant. I am not sure that this is your intention, but you must be aware of how your words are taken on a forum when we only have your writing as a basis of understanding. On a forum you cannot add the charm of your personality to soften the harsh attitude in a delivery the way you can in a direct personal conversation. Perhaps you intend a degree of irony? I cannot tell from what you write.

 

On this forum we make a point of letting our work speak more than words. You must not like everything you see or applaud every effort, naturally. Critical discussions on techniques, materials and definitions are also very rewarding and critical input is often asked for. But it is good to be aware of context. I think you show a lack of such awareness in your post.

 

By delivering such a verdict as you do in your post you make out to be an expert on the Japanese sword and put yourself above Jesus in his efforts to show us the details of his work and practical knowledge.

When you post in this brusque manner I´m not inclined to take your words seriously. Behind your words I hear an emptiness that comes from lack of substance, making your post ring with a hollow and slightly pathetic note. That is a pity, because I may be misunderstanding you and your intentions.

 

A discussion on nomenclature of weapons and tools is useful and can be entertaining, but it is best kept to a separate topic rather than a post that derails this educational thread started by Jesus. Your post does not come across as productive or constructive in the manner and place you delivered it.

Please consider your words, your motivation and your attitude when posting your opinions on this forum. Critique is valuable. Don´t mess up that opportunity by a sloppy delivery and careless attitude.

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Firstly, for Jesus. I enjoy each time you post your work and share your process with us here on the forum. I know for certain you are more knowledgable than myself and I look to you (and others) for inspiration and direction.

 

I do not mean to detract from a thread and video I have reviewed many times already but I felt the need to reply. Peter I agree whole heartedly with your tactful reply. It sums up my feelings to the tee. I rarely read replies from members that come across as that one did, and as an inexperienced smith I appreciate how the more knowledgable members critique and offer insight into posted works, and do so in a way which makes me want to share more

 

It's hour 11 of a 12 hour night shift and this may have bothered more than it normally would, but I know when I make a comment about another craftsmans work I stay within my arcs, in fear of my words sounding like that.

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I think that is a really nice blade. :rolleyes:

(And I wonder why Jesus still uses Gloves when he recognises that this is a misguided
think from school. I would be afraid to develop an allergy, if it is used so often).

With the critic,I thing, would the most modern Japanese agree, in the way, that it not follows there
new, very concert rules of making a Katana, to confirm the law to bee a peace of art (and no weapon).

But here it is clearly shown in the heading, that it has not the attempt to match these rules :excl:


Be aware of my mistakes, I have to dig out my School-English. :wacko:

Schöne Grüße
Andreas

Edited by Andreas Nohl
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