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Some Excellent Staffordshire Photography


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That's the way I was thinking. Take a bar of steel with a flat edge, say 1mm wide, and using an onglette graver (or even a square point) cut a line down the center, harden, then grind the outside bevels. You could even make a double-grooved one if need be.

 

 

Do you think hardening is even needed for dead soft silver or gold?

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And you didn't call. Hmph.

 

 

Sorry Chris, I was visiting my nephew, and his family. He is a SWAT cop for the Cap. police.

Next time, I'll give you a call. I would love to see your shop.

I want to see the hoard again before it goes away.

Mark

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I'll make you a graver or three and sharpen it if you want me to. If I make it to Baltimore this year we can play with it. It's easier than you'd think, but you do need to practice it. You could also try it with a cutoff wheel on a Dremel...

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the blade is very short, like 2" of groove if i remember it well

Heck, I could do that with a triangular file with one face ground smooth! That's how I start a lot of filework on hawk heads. :huh:

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Allright, I'm headed out to the shop after dinner.

 

 

 

And yes, to reiterate, anyone coming to see the hoard is welcome here. I have a guest room as well, if that helps. 2 months and counting.

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Heck, I could do that with a triangular file with one face ground smooth! That's how I start a lot of filework on hawk heads. :huh:

 

 

We're talking about an incredibly thin groove here, man... 0.2mm wide. Round shaped, from a round graver, if I've read everything here correctly. 0.4mm for the "big" beads. I think the teeth on most files will exceed that after about the 3rd stroke.

 

 

That's why, as a non-jeweler, I was thinking a thin piece of 15n20, folded over in half, with the two edges properly dressed, might be one way to skin the cat... but there's a lot of room to screw that up, too. Basically take that .pdf documentation of the beading file, and flip it upside down - the guy uses two plates in a base, and a wooden spatula to roll the wire - Petr's talking about using a knife with two edges on a wood base, to roll the wire. Either way, the distance between the two edges can't exceed 0.20mm for the small beads found in the Hoard.

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Lesson 1: Graving isn't hard, but graving that small with an ad-hoc tool is. I gave up for the night, but like the idea of a top-knife/bottom board if I can indeed make the knife.

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This problem was solved a long time ago.

http://www.die-bajuwaren.de/Spatha09.htm

Much like rolling threads on a bolt I imagine or how the Chinese made pills many a year ago.

 

The issue of making the tool is solved not by making one tool with a groove, but by taking two thinned tools and setting them "side by each" as the Belgians say around here. Several profiles can be done this way by adapting the bevel on the metal plates...not just rounded.

 

 

Ric

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Richard, do you have a lot of people coming from Belgium in your neighbourhood?

I know some ware coming, end the 19th. begin the 20th. centuries, from an area, near the city of Namur, where I was studying...some time ago :rolleyes: and about 30 km far from the town where I was born (Huy).

A cousin of me was visiting the "Belgian" communities in the US, about 20 years ago.

These peoples are also coming back to Belgium to meet their relatives who are always living in Belgium.(a lot always in their family farms).For more "Belgian - Americans" the first time they came back, was during WWII to free us.

Edited by Jacques Delfosse
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Well, there must be a trick to the bead file - I've tried a half dozen combinations, and I can't get it to roll a round-ish bead of any gauge, using dead soft .999 silver, steel rails, and wood base.

 

 

I'm now attempting to make a plier-based organarium, I've soldered a pair of opposing steel "teeth" onto an old pair of pliers, and am slowly filing in the tooling. If that fails, I'm going to have to find someone who's done this before to show me what I'm missing.

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Did you anneal the wire yourself. I know I have a quite a bit that was said to be dead soft, but wasn't.

 

OK, this intrigued me so much I had to go to the work bench and see what was up.

 

Here is a piece of pretty fat silver wire, that fluffed with a torch for a second or two, and looked for something on the bench to use to roll it.Pic257.JPG

Now, mind you, I did all this in 10 min. However, I can see if you had the right tool, and maybe a bit of a jig to help keep the wire rolling straight, and a good bit of time you can make some form of beaded wire, without too much trouble.

 

On the right end I used a kinda dull edge of a small diamond file. Give it a nice texture, and shine. The mid part was done with a failed bloom iron knife. The edge was a bit sharp, but I think if I rounded the edge off a bit, this would be very usable.

You need a very hard wood surface, and good pressure.

Keep at it Chris. You likely have something just hanging around the shop that will work just fine with a little mods.

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I didn't anneal it myself, though it feels very soft in the hand when bending or straightening. My attempts only seemed to texture the wire, not deform it even as much as you've shown, or just break off the end I'm working on. Using a nice piece of red oak for my rolling board.

 

 

While I don't expect this to just be easy, I'd like to think it's something I can figure out quickly enough to make it worthwhile. My pliers are almost done, took me a while to figure out how to secure the dies, and now I'm slowly forming the teeth and getting the "bite" clean. Will report on that later tonight, I think.

 

 

 

Happy New Year, too, folks. Thanks for the help.

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Here is my latest Faux Staffordshire test. Colored resin. It has some promise.

 

Pic266.JPG

 

I think I will do a nicely cut pattern, and do a full test with maybe 3, slightly different color shades mixed up. That should look pretty natural.

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Maybe he was told to.

It seems they have been very strict about any pics of the hoard. I know they need to PAY for it all, but these items are unprecedented history. There are researchers, and artists that want to see GOOD pics of the stuff that has been cleaned. From many angles!

I would assume they have taken these pics, and have not released them because they want money.

Well,I say sell them! Get the pics up on a file you can buy. I know I would pay good money to see close/multiangle shots of all the sword fittings. If It's about money, sell it! If it isn't, get the darn pics out to the world.

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I agree, if you're fundraising, more awareness is what's needed - the lockdown on photography isn't helping, and certainly doesn't encourage me to send them anything, if I can't learn from their treasure.

 

Good thing I saved them all to my hard drive.

Edited by Christopher Price
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  • 3 months later...

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