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does anyone have any tips on NOT cracking multi-bar blades???


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I know its against the rules, but I fell in love with a blade before the heat treat :o . Its ready to quench right now, and the edge is around 1/8 inch thick (spine is 1/4 inch, full flat grind); the welds are "good" but whenever I go to forge it, it needs to be babyed because it "wants" to come apart. I've had to go back and re-weld a couple times. The steels are 1080, 15n20, slaggy-ish wrought iron, and maybe some sheer steel. I REALLY want this thing to survive. So does anyone have any tips on HTing multi bar blades? I usually quench in canola oil. Should I heat it up or leave it cold? Would extra normalizations help it survive? Fewer normalizations?? any help would be greatly appreciated. Its a cool blade..and its in the KITH, so keep that in mind :lol:

 

Edited to say that I just noticed this is in the wrong section...I meant to put it in the metalurgy section. Sorry about that.

Edited by Luke Shearer

“Then something Tookish woke up inside him, and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a walking-stick.”

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there should be no problem with that mix . warm oil normalise and keep just above critical.

 

I must say that the phraze " the welds are "good" but whenever I go to forge it, it needs to be babyed because it "wants" to come apart." is easily translated into "the welds havent taken".........

forging soul in to steel

 

owenbush.co.uk

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I've done some 2 bar butt welds.. and if they come apart like that they just haven't welded.. at least with my experience. Once welded two pieces of steel should act like one. Even when welds fail it can look like they took because flux and scale can keep everything stuck together. Have you ground and etched???

 

I would focus on where those bars are coming apart, try to clean em out with files, dremel, whatever and get some flux in there followed by a good, long soak at welding heat.

 

I know one thing for sure.. it's damn frustrating isn't it?

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Yeah, the welds "look good". It is ground and etched, and it looks and acts like a solid piece of steel when ground. No little lines from slag or cold shuts. That's what has me confused. It may be that the welds aren't mature? I've had a welded on tang that I was able to tear off with my bare hands; the welded area was clean steel, and it was stuck... I might give it a good soak above critical to grow gain across the boundaries, if that sounds good...I'll post a picture if you guys want. I'm not saying its free of weld flaws, but they are small, not noticeable after an etch. This is frustrating...especially after aaaalllll that hand hammering :wacko:

“Then something Tookish woke up inside him, and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a walking-stick.”

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Just remember; if it was easy anybody could do it. When you've got a hundred welds behind you, you'll wonder why you ever had trouble.

Edited by nakedanvil

[font="Book Antiqua"][color="#0000FF"][size="5"][b]Perfection[/b][/size]

[i][size="3"]is achieved not when there is nothing left to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.[/size][/i][/color][/font]

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Okay, it survived the quench. I gave it about a 15 min soak above critical, then gave it 4 of my most precise normalizations ever :rolleyes:. I quenched it this morning and now its in the oven. Thanks guys!

“Then something Tookish woke up inside him, and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a walking-stick.”

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Yeah! And as a bonus, the blade even hardened up really nice :):P !

Edited by Luke Shearer

“Then something Tookish woke up inside him, and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a walking-stick.”

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I would like to add, and I bet you guys suspected this -_- , but after HT, grinding, and a quick etch, I looked carefully over the whole thing, and there were quite a few of those historically accurate, yet highly annoying welding flaws. Mostly found between the individual bars. Seems like every time I push myself, I learn quite alot. I'll do better next time...I really appreciate everyone's desire to share information on this forum. I've been taught just about everything I know from this place :D

Edited by Luke Shearer

“Then something Tookish woke up inside him, and he wished to go and see the great mountains, and hear the pine-trees and the waterfalls, and explore the caves, and wear a sword instead of a walking-stick.”

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  • 3 weeks later...

I would like to add, and I bet you guys suspected this -_- , but after HT, grinding, and a quick etch, I looked carefully over the whole thing, and there were quite a few of those historically accurate, yet highly annoying welding flaws. Mostly found between the individual bars. Seems like every time I push myself, I learn quite alot. I'll do better next time...I really appreciate everyone's desire to share information on this forum. I've been taught just about everything I know from this place :D

Wrought can be very troublesome with tool steels. I don't use it in any way, shape or form for blade work, fittings are another story, they can give you a nice grainy look without the problem of pattern-welding but you have to work hot and be very careful when slitting holes in it.

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