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grinder motor loosing power


J. Helmes
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Hi , I have an industrial 1 horse motor powering my 2 x 72 grinder and I have noticed it acting up lately. It seems to need to come up to speed now and it bogs down easily. Today after an hour or so it got really hot and started smoking. It dosent sound like a berring is failing .Is it time to replace it or is there something I can do?

 

Jeff

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Hi J

 

hopefully its a tefc motor..or the dust could be very bad

 

if its the ball bearings... you should be able to spin it and hear them balls a grindin..

 

if the capacitors go...it can make it hard to start and no power ... if you can check em ... and they are abit exploded then that'll be the prob

 

but if its your windings... and they got overheated and cooked the varnish off em... thats time to send it to the rebuild shop..

 

what brand motor is it... a new 1hp is a good couple of bucks..

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Sounds like either the armature or field windings are burning out (causing heat)

rewinding or replacing is unfortunately the cure ....My .02

Edited by Clifford Brewer

If ya can't be good don't git caught  !!                                        People who say stuff can't be done need to

                                                                                                        git the hell outta the way of people who do stuff   !!!

Show me a man who is called an expert by his peers         

And I will show you a good man to listen to ......

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and I will show you an egotistical asshole...............!!

 

                             

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Blow it out with compressed air (wear your respirator). Open frame motors are doomed in grinder applications. Well, all motors are doomed in grinder applications eventually, it is simply a matter of lifespan/elapsed time in service.

 

The only way to not wear things out is to not use them. You should upgrade to at least two horsepower anyway. You'll like it. Three is even better, especially if you do variable frequency drive to a three phase motor. The frequency drive is spendy, but three phase motors are cheap if you do a bit of scrounging around.

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rebuilding electric motors isn't very difficult if you understand how "things" works. on most cases, a simple disassembly an cleaning is all that is needed. while you have the case apart, it is a good idea to light sand the armature contacts (where the brushed ride) with some emery cloth, or some sand paper. 320grit is plenty aggressive for this. make it all shint and pretty and then reassemble. If the brushes are worn down significantly, replace them. This is usually not necessary on the first disassembly. I learned this on starters and alternators for vehicles, but it;s the same for all "normal" motors. if you have any detailed questions, feel free to ask them, I'd be happy to help out.

Have you ever thought about the life of steel? It's interesting to think that you can control the fate of a piece of metal.

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Blow it out with compressed air (wear your respirator). Open frame motors are doomed in grinder applications. Well, all motors are doomed in grinder applications eventually, it is simply a matter of lifespan/elapsed time in service.

 

The only way to not wear things out is to not use them. You should upgrade to at least two horsepower anyway. You'll like it. Three is even better, especially if you do variable frequency drive to a three phase motor. The frequency drive is spendy, but three phase motors are cheap if you do a bit of scrounging around.

 

Seconding what Howard says, get rid of every non-enclosed motor in your shop NOW. They have the same business being in a bladesmith shop as a family of porcupines have in a nudist colony.

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rebuilding electric motors isn't very difficult if you understand how "things" works. on most cases, a simple disassembly an cleaning is all that is needed. while you have the case apart, it is a good idea to light sand the armature contacts (where the brushed ride) with some emery cloth, or some sand paper. 320grit is plenty aggressive for this. make it all shint and pretty and then reassemble. If the brushes are worn down significantly, replace them. This is usually not necessary on the first disassembly. I learned this on starters and alternators for vehicles, but it;s the same for all "normal" motors. if you have any detailed questions, feel free to ask them, I'd be happy to help out.

 

Well not really, sanding the armature on a brushed motor by hand is a bad idea you need spin it locked in place so you dont get it out of round, sometimes they just get out of round by themself. I rebuild 10,000 rpm brushed motors a little brush chatter will 1 ruin the brushes you just replaced 2 ruin the motor. go to a vaccum shop and get a stick of commantors stone, there should be a pannel to open and gain access to the armature 1 replace brushes 2 blow out extra carbon dust 3 turn on and run the stone on the commantor(where the brushes ride)and that will resurface and keep it round. grinder motors are mostly brushless so if it fails you can clean it out and hope for the best. Hope this helps and you can also buy carbon brushes at the same shop.

To error is human To really ****up you need a computer. BTW I hate computers. Knowledge is Power, what You do with it either makes you a leader or a dictator

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