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Scott A. Roush

'Lasagna' Kwaiken

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This is from a billet (you can see the start of this in the Bloomers and Buttons section) comprised of bloomery steel sent to me by Mark Green, shear steel I made at Ric Furrer's workshop, 'orishigane' I made from wrought iron nails and W2. You can see the pictures of most of the process here: My link But I basically did something similar to what Jesus Hernandez shows on his website... a paddle layered with bits and pieces of all of the above, flux and steel powder. I folded the billet several times, adding layers of 1/8" W2 for the first 5. I still didn't get as fine a pattern as I wanted.. but I was lamenting the loss of the billet through scaling. I ended up getting a large flux pocket that didn't show during forging for some reason.. but showed up at heat treat. So I had to cut a nice tanto into two kwaiken blades. One blade is shown here. The other one is being sent to somebody from this forum who offered to do a full Japanese polish on it. I'm very excited to see this.

 

On this blade I wanted to do an etch and polish that highlighted the hada rather than the hamon. There is a hamon... but I simply don't have the necessary abrasives to bring it out properly. The guard is shear steel blackened by torch heating and quenching in ferric chloride. The wood is osage orange with both sap and heart wood. I have to say that I LOVE this blade design. To me it's the perfect everyday/woodcraft knife.

 

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Another really nice knife, Scott. And I agree it looks like a great everyday/woodcraft knife. It amazes me how productive you seem to be, continually posting one beautiful piece after another. I admire what you're doing.

J

 

JD WARE KNIVES

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That blade came out pretty nice Scott. I can see the hamon fine.

Great job, congrats on the project.

 

Mark

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Thank you Jesus. Other than adding in layers of W2 during the folds. And changing the orientation of the pieces. But a lot of the pattern came from the uneven stacks of material I had.. so a lot of edge material became incorporated into the pattern. In retrospect I wouldn't do that again.. because I'm certain that is what let to a lot of the weld failures I encountered.

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