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Gerald Boggs

Tom Latane' Forging 17th Century Axe Heads

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Thanks, Gerald! I just put a deposit on it. :D I have tried and failed to make that socketed axe form a few times, and even more than that I want to meet Tom. I've wanted to take classes from him for years, but it was never so convenient for me.

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I agree, Tom is an excellent smith and an excellent teacher. Some of the stuff he does is incredible

 

I took a class with him several years ago. Here's a photo of what we were being inspired to try. Alas, mine in no way looks this good. All made with hand tools. Just pushing iron around.

 

As for this class, you'll see me there, I better be, I helped organize it :-)

 

The Old Dominion blacksmith Guild has a working relationship with the Jacksonville Center for the Arts. We help take care of the forge studio, in return, we get to use the studio for some of our meetings. The Saturday before the class, I'll be doing a workshop on Tooling for Tenon and Mortise (Journal?) It's open to all, you don't have to be a member. Fee is $20. We try to keep everything as inexpensive as possible.

http://olddominionblacksmith.com/Schedule.php

 

Last bit of info: Floyd is a center for country and folk music. Floyd has been doing a Friday night jam for years. Several venues have organized music jams and all along main street, folks get together and jam. It's a good time by all. So if you come, try to arrange your schedule to be there for a Friday night.

Picture 1137 Large Web view.jpg

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damn damn damn.

I have a class running up to the day before.....

. what would be connecting air ports for this class? I wonder if there is a red eye flight?

Alan and a cool teacher with a beard (damned fine looking axes as well) oooooh !

Edited by owen bush

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I wonder if he can be persuaded to fly your way. I took Mick over to his shop a couple years ago.

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I remember it well, Mike. Tom's locks and very detailed work stick in my mind. Also he and his wifes hospitality, sitting in their garden eating a fine lunch under the shade of the trees.

 

Mick

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. what would be connecting air ports for this class? I wonder if there is a red eye flight?

 

Charlotte isn't too far, and if you hopped a commuter flight to Johnson City you could ride with me...

 

Otherwise look for one to Roanoke, Virginia. That's the closest place that has shuttle flights to bigger airports. Then you could try to talk Jesus into taking the class too! ;)

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Still a couple of spaces left.

Just wanted to put the offer out there: If you're flying in, I can pick you up at the airport.

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Anyone from here besides myself and Gerald taking this class? One week to go!

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I just had to add that Tom is one of the most humble and talented teachers I've ever worked with. I took his 5th century norse lock class last October and have called and stopped by his shop a couple of times since for advice on finishing it up and correcting problems I've had and he is always willing to help. I would of loved to taken this class when he taught it at Tunnel Mill in SE MN but I couldn't swing it. Good luck and enjoy to everybody whose taking it.

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I for one am looking forward to seeing piccies...

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You shall have pics when I get home, fear not. :)

Itmay be tuesday, but I'll post some.

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Good Day to all. The week has come and gone. Tom Latane, as always, taught an excellent class. I've got one ax forged and a second halfway. Alan has the photos, so I'll leave it up to him to post. When I get the filing and chasing done, I'll post a photo of the finished axe.

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It was a truly great class, Tom is a wizard, and Gerald is a true gentleman and an excellent smith. The other guys were no exception, even the poor kid who did this as his SECOND EVER forging experience. :ph34r:

 

As for photos, well, my new camera which is also my new phone doesn't talk nicely to this elderly computer here at the house, so it will be Tuesday at the office before I can get them downloaded and posted. <_<

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It was a truly great class, Tom is a wizard, and Gerald is a true gentleman and an excellent smith. The other guys were no exception, even the poor kid who did this as his SECOND EVER forging experience. :ph34r:

 

As for photos, well, my new camera which is also my new phone doesn't talk nicely to this elderly computer here at the house, so it will be Tuesday at the office before I can get them downloaded and posted. <_<

 

Come on tighten those stitches and get those lecky gadgets nattering tert tother.

 

Please. Sir

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Just gotta resize 'em and they'll be up. Today, I promise! B)

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And here we go!

 

The starting materials are a sheet of 4x4x5/16" 1018 for the socket, a bar of 1/2x3x5 for the blade, and a bar of 5/8" round W1 for the edge steel.

 

axclass 1.jpg

 

The socket sheet hammered to shape before slitting (this is the stage I was working on when I cut my finger :rolleyes: )

 

axclass 2.jpg

 

Gerald's second socket in progress. Here he's cut it to shape and is starting to draw out the scarfs.

 

axclass 4.jpg

 

Here's what it looks like after the scarfs are in place. Note these are bent in the wrong direction and will be bent the other way before closing the socket. (And Gerald thought nobody noticed... ;) )

 

axclass 8.jpg

 

Two shots of the steps to final assembly.

 

axclass 3.jpg

 

axclass 5.jpg

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Here's Tom forging the back of the blade section to fit the socket, with John Riddle looking on.

 

axclass Tom John.jpg

 

And here's what the back of the blade looks like when it's ready to weld into the socket. Note that devilish tab that will cover the seam in the front of the socket!

 

axclass 6.jpg

 

And the socket and blade fitted prior to welding.

 

axclass 7.jpg

 

Gerald displays his handiwork.

 

axclass Gerald.jpg

 

Ed whose last name escapes me shows his too.

 

axclass Ed.jpg

 

Tom's photos of two originals, dated 1663 and 1669.

 

axclass orginals.jpg

 

Here's Tom laying out the chasing patterns on one of his.

 

axclass Tom layout.jpg

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Tom chasing, with Doug Wilson, John Riddle, and Gerald Boggs looking on.

 

axclass chasing.jpg

 

And finally, an overview of one side of the shop with the (right to left) valiant Cody (again escaped last name) shaping with edge steel, Doug Wilson choosing a hammer, John Riddle getting a good welding heat, and Gerald having a sip of coffee.

 

axclass overview.jpg

 

Note the only power tools used were a bandsaw to cut the starting stock and an angle grinder to descale and occasionally level out some lumps. All the rest of the cutting and fullering was done by hand. Tools used were a slitting chisel, a 1/2" fuller, a 1/2" half-round butcher to set down that little tab on the blade, and a 3/4" fuller.

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Here's what it looks like after the scarfs are in place. Note these are bent in the wrong direction and will be bent the other way before closing the socket. (And Gerald thought nobody noticed... ;) )

 

I'm just glad I caught it before I started the final bend :-)

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that looks to be a great class . and very good axes as well.

I am envious.

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Ive had an image of one of his axes on my computer for a while as part of my research and interesting things folder and i wouldve loved to have been there.

 

fascinating technique.

 

thanks very much for the pictures Alan.

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