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matt venier

Homemade Sawyers Anvil

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So I hatched this plan on a very long and lonely (and loud for those that remember) late night drive back from last years Fire & Brimstone hammerin. See Kerry & Matt Stagmer have this Mousehole sawyers anvil that I've been in love with for four years now, the problem is they won't sell it to me. I've scoured the web looking with no luck. So I had an idea, I'll make one! Stand back and watch the fun begin.

 

Step one: find a suitable block o' steel

 

http://www.bladesmithsforum.com/index.php?showtopic=20001&st=0&p=186926&fromsearch=1entry186926

 

scroll about halfway down on the first page.

 

The funny thing was that Aldo was allready going to the scrapyard where this block was located the next day!!

 

Step two: Talk Aldo into cutting the 12"x12"x18" block into two 9"x12"x12" blocks

 

A2cut2.jpg

A2cut.jpg

 

I know I know, A few people told me I was crazy to cut it in half but A: How was I going to move a 800Lb (say it with me) EIGHT HUNDRED pound anvil, B: How was I going to heat treat a 800lb anvil. And Aldo was interested in the other half so I did it.

 

Loading up the block.

 

<object width="400" height="224" ><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="movie" value="http://www.facebook.com/v/1844231751694" /><embed src="http://www.facebook.com/v/1844231751694" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="400" height="224"></embed></object>

 

Step three: Tap some holes for lifting and moving it and get to some grinding & shaping with some abrasive cup wheels, flap discs and a little filing

 

Tap.jpg

Drill.jpg

 

And we have something that looks more like an anvil instead of a random block o steel.

 

grind2.jpg

topgrind-1.jpg

 

Step four attach chain and bring it to "Heat Treat Area" AKA the back yard.

 

tent-1.jpg

 

Please don't pick on the state of my car tent it's all cleaned up now.

 

Step Five : Prepare heat treat forge IE take an old woodstove you've had hanging around, cut a hole in the side and enlarge the front hole, line with fire brick then some of that "safe" kaowool, put it on top of some cinderblocks and stick my oilburner out of my forge in it and we are ready to go!

 

setup2.jpg

setup.jpg

 

Step six: lower in anvil and fire up the burner

 

lift.jpg

Cooking.jpg

cooking2.jpg

 

Once the forge temp leveled off (about 1900F) I would shut the burner off for a few minutes and see where the temp dropped to figuring once it stayed at 1750ish I could begin my "soak" for 30 minutes. surprisingly it only took about 3 hours for that to happen. I thought it would take a lot longer than that.

 

Here I'm pulling out of the forge.

 

 

Glow.jpg

quench2.jpg

quench.jpg

 

Viola'

 

Viola.jpg

 

Now the anvil is hard, how hard I'm not sure. it rebounds a hammer really well compared to my 200lb trenton. A file will bite into it a bit. As you strike down the side of it you can feel a difference when you get closer to the bottom. At this point I need to reline my regular forge so I have yet to use it and as soon as I can I will take a picture of it on the big stump I got for it. I hope you all enjoyed my hillbilly engineered anvil project.

 

Matt

 

Well it looks like I messed up embedding the video from facebook. Can anyone tell me what I did wrong?

Edited by matt venier

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Wonderful Matt....good project!

....any issues with tempering?

 

Ric

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Hillbilly for sure! look at all those lawn ornaments..er I mean car parts! :D

 

Matt, it is amazing to actually see someone go through with this, I can't count on both hands how many times I have discussed this exact process with Aldo.

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I am envious, Matt. I too tried to get that anvil from Kerry to no avail but you found an alternative.

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That's one beast of a block of steel :ph34r:

Interesting use for the stove. I'm glad the anvil turned out so well, looks like a keeper.

 

John

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Awesome hillbilly engineering! So you only heat treated the face? I may have to try this with my big chunk of D2, thanks for sharing the process

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Your ingenuity has trumped a problem for you. Great work and thanks for sharing your process. That looks like one heck of an anvil. Why is it called a "sawyers anvil?"

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Nice job! Few people are willing to take on a 400-lb block of steel in the back yard, myself included. B)

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Matt

 

Thats one of the coolest HT methods I have seen done to home made anvil

Nice work and thanks for showing, thats one slick lookign anvil B)

 

Niko

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that is a steel (steal)

 

I bet you are gonna love forging on it.

kc

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Ric:

As far as tempering I haven't really tempered it (yet). It doesn't feel really hard, a file will bite it and it gives good rebound but doesn't fling the hammer back at your head like Kerry's anvil so I'm thinking I didn't get as much hardness as possible with A2 (though I'm thinking that's not a bad thing). What are you're thoughts?

 

Howard:

The block with the sharp corners had a really high pitched and LOUD ring. I found the more I filed the edges the quieter it got. I did leave one edge almost sharp just in case I had a need for such thing. I also thought the beveled corners looked pretty cool too.

 

Deker:

Considering how much of a lowrider my car looked like with that thing in the back I don't think I want to drive any distance with it :D

 

Troy:

Sayers anvil were used buy sawblade makers to put the right tension on saw blades, I hope I'm putting that right.

 

Thanks for all the replies guys. Having an air hardening steel is key for this to work. I would want to think about how much water it would take if you found a chunk of 1045 this size. It doesn't really show in the pictures but I had almost half of that block up to temp!

 

 

 

I also have a question for the witty creative types. I'd like to come up with a fictitious anvil company name (something funny, sarcastic, play on words but subtle) that I would emblazon on the side of the anvil, any ideas?

 

Also any ides on how to emblazon a logo on a big anvil that doesn't include CNC mills and/or a whole lot of money?

 

Matt

Edited by matt venier

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ACME, of course.

 

I hadn't thought of the ring as potentially related t the corners, that is interesting. I doubt if you got full hardness out of it that way, but that is not a bad thin, in my estimation. I think the only way you could get enough water on a carbon steel block that size to harden it would be a water tower and big pipe.

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Hah, thats the first thing that came to mind when i saw the heat treat pic... but but he didn't put his name or logo on it.. :unsure:

 

Matt's Monster block.. guess you could acid etch it in ? probably be the easier way to do it

 

by the way.... that is what i've always dreamed of doing.. .. i've got a small 5'inch round of h13 that weighs about 25lbs, still haven't gotten around to making my little block anvil... i know a chap with a big massey and my hope is to get it forged into a nice little viking anvil.. a nice dream

 

 

awesome post !!!

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Your anvil looks great. Good job. This is my sawyers anvil I got from a old saw mill that I worked at.th_SANY0253.jpg

Edited by whiteforge

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I also have a question for the witty creative types. I'd like to come up with a fictitious anvil company name (something funny, sarcastic, play on words but subtle) that I would emblazon on the side of the anvil, any ideas?

 

I say "Hammerfall". Of course, that's probably because I just finished reading Larry Niven's "Lucifer's Hammer" recently so it popped directly to mind. the reference has diddly to do with 'smithing, but I still think it would be a good choice :)

 

-d

Edited by deker

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That's massive. The heat treating is ingenious. I have a smaller block of H13 that I recently found. It's 125 lbs. I have it laying long-ways now and I feel like I could use more mass under it. It's not as hard as my Trenton, but it does have nice large square surfaces and corners still.

14b6bda348474d17e0b8538709df9dd8_82300_lrg.jpg

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Well I relined my forge and got to do a little forging on the new anvil and boy am I one happy camper!!!

Great rebound and it is SOOOOO nice to work on a surface that is truly flat and basically has a 12"x 9" sweet spot :D

 

Here are some pictures on it's new stump in it's new home.

 

P2042777.jpg

P2042778.jpg

with my new hammer from Sam Salvati which if my small hammer from Sam is called "The Sammer"

then I think I'll call this one "The SLAMMER"

 

P2042782.jpg

Artistic shot with a Pattern welded Katana I'm working on

 

P2042783.jpg

My new forging cabana! A benefit to working where I do is occaisionally a client wants to discard there marketing/trade show display so I ended up with this!

 

Matt

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Very very cool Matt!!!

 

Love that cabana. I need one of those.

 

That anvil rocks!!!!

Mark

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Nice anvil, nice hammers, nice blade. Are you trying to get it done by the F&B hammer-in?

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Good job Other Matt! And Jesus you just stay away from my anvil. Can't wait till you guys see my new anvil "stump".

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Good job Other Matt! And Jesus you just stay away from my anvil. Can't wait till you guys see my new anvil "stump".

 

Do you mean you raised it up to a less backbreaking height? Then I surely will sit on it like is mine and not let anybody else play with it.

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