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GaretJax

Best steel for a beginner

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I ordered a few feet of 1095 (cracked too much on me..will have to try again later when I learn a lot more) and a 22' bar of 5160 I'm playing with now..

 

I bought one of those 22 foot pieces of 5160 from Pacific Steel for half the price that Admiral wanted.  Shipping was cheaper too but that could be because I'm a left coaster.  I'll stick with Pacific in the future probably.

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...only ordered steel twice... All from Admiral. As far as ordering stuff goes...

Nice...and the steel got to my place relatively quick[ly].

..[but] of poor quality?

...newbie ...[w/]little basis for comparison.

Lambert

Lambert

 

Lambert/ Lambchopicus ...

1)  Oh, please, save 'nice,' it matters not.

2)  Dunno where you live but try Koval Knives outta Columbus, OH.  

2-1/2 yrs ago, an undrgrad buddy o'mine turned me on to them and --so far-- Koval's 1095 has been great.   Granted... John & I bought yards of it.   But.   If you get K-KN's 1095

into the quench (peanut oil because: 1] free and 2] works)quickly enough, it's fine.  High flash point, too.

 

Al Massey --my Northern Mentor (One-of-Two:  Mike W being my Southern Mentor)-- said to quench 1095 in under *ONE* second.

I do what Al says and my knives(?.. Mike W.'s still out-to-lunch on that..?) work.  1095's been very, very good to me .. But only as long as I did what I was told ...

 

Trish

 

ps:  peanut oil smells *good* ........

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Trish, I have to ask, where do you get free peanut oil? What a bargain!

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I take my oil in cooked-food shops.

It is "second-hand" peanuts oil, but it work and is FREE...It will be burned in every case when you quench your blade

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Trish, I have to ask, where do you get free peanut oil? What a bargain!

Snagged (appropriated, kifed, stole) 20 gallons new 2 winters ago from a local greasy-spoon because of the aniphilactic shock thingy w/some folks.   Peanut oil keeps very well *if* you add a couple (dissolvable) capsules of vitamin E --GNC store-- every 3 mos or so.

 

Helps if you make the owner /cook a knife......

.....PR is a good thing.

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"They are WAY cheaper than admiral, and you will actually GET what you have ordered. And, everybody you will talk to there will actually have some clue of what you are talking about...."

 

Also.....

 

 

"At this point I wouldn't take steel from admiral even if it was being given to me."

I'm curious....

 

Seeing as how I'm a newbie, I've only ordered steel twice..ever. All from Admiral. As far as ordering stuff goes...I thought they did well for me. Nice on the phone, and the steel got to my place relatively quick.

 

I ordered a few feet of 1095 (cracked too much on me..will have to try again later when I learn a lot more) and a 22' bar of 5160 I'm playing with now..

 

Your post leads me to believe that you've ordered from them before and NOT received what you asked for. Is that right?

 

In regard to not taking it if it was being given to you...is it of poor quality?

 

Again..I'm a newbie and have little basis for comparison.

 

Thanks.

 

Lambert

Well, this is another case of where ones mans problems is another mans blessings. I know guys that I respect who (for whatever reason) won't buy from Admiral Steel.

 

I bought a couple of 22' bars from them and it was the right size, cheap shipping (I'm only 180 miles from them!) and the cleanest 5160 most guys have ever seen. I'd heard horror stories about inclusions and shipping the wrong alloy, blah, blah. But my opinion is that Admiral has done well by me...I paid a little over $100 for a 22' bar cut into 40" lengths (2 1/4" wide) a few years ago and I'm still making stuff out of it. But there are plenty of places to buy new 5160 (or used if that is your preference) and Admiral is just one of them.

 

When you pay your money, you take your chances. But I am one who has never had problems with Admiral and appreciate the fact that they are nice on the phone/Email. Cheap? Well, I have seen better prices but still $19 for a 40" piece of clean 5160 2 1/4" wide is *cheap* in my book...for a knife blade with a 5" blade and 5" tang that is like $5 worth of steel. I don't know about you, but I can't screw around very long for $5....maybe 15 minutes.

 

Brian

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Just as a side note, don't be too quick to dismiss working round stock without a power hammer/press.  3/4" stock is very versatile, it can be drawn out to the thickness of your choice without widening too much , or can be flattened to 1 1/4" by 3/16", with all variations in between.  All this can be achieved with a 4 pound hammer, and breaking down stock is a good way to learn hammer technique before getting to the detailed stuff!

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Monty, check out British Blades for specific UK resources; post a question there if you can't find what you need.  Stubbs' Silver Steel and the silver steel from West Yorkshire Steel are quite close to W1 and are serious cutlery steel, if you are prepared to forge from round stock.

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Cheers mate.I figured West Yorks steel was the way to go. Yeah, good bunch of folks over at British Blades. I read a lot on that forum.

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There's the odd one or two of us hang around here from time to time too ;)

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i dont blame ya mate...this is a great place too!

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I've had problems with warpage in a toaster oven, anyone else? Admitedly the blade was on the this side.

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A couple of tips:

 

If you want to go the spring steel way, do not use springs from old trucks or used springs in general. They often have microcracks caused by years of exploitation.

 

If you're into Japanese-style blades, spring steel is not your option too.

The most common spring steel 5160 has about 0.8% - 0.9% Chromium in it and this makes the steel deep hardening and in the majority of cases the blades do not show a Hamon after the differential hardening.

 

5160 is the steel of choice for European blades and makes great hunting knives and bowies. If you need a good cutter, use 5160. It won't disappoint you.

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Ouch, I just noticed hat this thread was from 2004. :lol: Guess that the guy doesn't need my tips anymore. green_angel.gif

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