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B. Norris

First Aid Kit MUST HAVES

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Liquid Bandage. Great stuff! I just went out and bought a bottle and am using it on a recent cut. I am really impressed. Is there something like this that you would recommend or consider indispensable in a shop first aid kit? If so, lets the rest of us know about it and the reasons you recommend it.

 

330-1200-1000-walgreens-liquid-bandage-1.jpg

 

It cost me $7 for the bottle but, only takes about one drop to cover a slice about 1cm long. I figure it is probably cheaper than traditional band-aids and far better at sealing the wound and preventing foreign matter from getting in there. My wound is healing far faster than it would have otherwise. I don't have a big, bulky bandage on the end of my pinky, and I can still work in the shop and get my hands dirty.

 

~Bruce~

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Medical tape. Especially if I'm doing intricate woodwork or filing where I have to use a very coarse file or a rasp. I tape up my hands in spots where whatever tool I'm using is likely to cut/abrade me (more of a preventative measure I guess). Of course, gloves would work, but they don't offer nearly as much dexterity, and I can't feel whatever I'm working on, which I really don't like. I also use it, sometimes with some paper towel, to quickly tape up cuts. I don't like the bandaid sticking off my finger either, and with tape I don't get that floppy falling off effect that is so common with bandaids. I also like to have butterfly closures for bigger cuts, but I generally keep them in the house so I don't lose them.

 

-Dan

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Eye wash.

 

I have a big bottle of Saline Solution sitting on the bench at all times. With all the flying bits of metal, acid, wood, epoxy, patina, etc. we have in a knife shop, something's gonna end up in your eye eventually.

 

A while ago I was lowering a blade into my tube of ferric chloride when it slipped and fell about 8" into the tube, splashing FC up, behind my safety glasses, into my eye.

 

Not sure how bad it would have been otherwise, but because I had the bottle handy, I had saline squirting into that eye in about 5 seconds. Everything seemed to be okay except for a bit of redness in that eye for the next day or so.

 

--Dave

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Electrical tape, gauze, neosporin, and saline eye wash, I can fix just about anything short of needing stitches. But then again I grew up with a dad who I watched on a couple occasions, stitch himself up,,, I'll let the doctor handle that

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Tweezers. For sure. Working with metal and wood and whatever else, I do not know where I would be without them. A good, sharp pair is essential in my book, as I have had a few nasty ones that I had to resort to cutting out because I did not have any around.

 

The medical tape that Dan said is another I keep supplied, as well as some run of the mill bandages.

 

That liquid bandage wizardry is outstanding, I have to agree. I only had the opportunity to use it once, but it far exceeded my expectations. The cut healed WAY faster than it would have on its lonesome, and it was in one of those awkward places where your fingers bend, so it would have kept splitting back open. And if I remember correctly, it is to some degree waterproof as well. You have me convinced.

 

 

John

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Well as far as I am concerned sutures are an essential bit of kit. Preferably an assortment of sizes, and the tools to use them. Betadine or Hibiclens, or both. Super glue, anti-biotic salve. Eye wash is good.

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In addition to all the above, a friend of mine who used to be an EMT always suggested some maxi-pads. Don't laugh, they soak up blood and provide protection for serious cuts and other blood-loss events and can be easily taped down.

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I use tweezers the most, Then regular band-aids (but I may have to give that liquid stuff a try. Comming from horse shoeing I mostly just tough it out and only worry about blood staining the piece I'm working on (but horseshoeing also taught me to be EXTREMELY CAREFUL) and think well ahead about what is going to get cut if I slip.

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Not really a "must have", but an aloe plant is nice to have when you occasionally grab the wrong end.

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Years ago I did glass work. The first thing I was told was to keep a roll of duck tape handy. One day we were cutting annealed glass on the cut table when a 4'X6' sheet broke in half and sliced my helper's leg wide open. He was pumping blood all over the place. I grabbed my masking tape and taped his leg as tight as I could until the blood stopped. Paramedics said the reason he was still alive when they got there was because of that duck tape. To this day I still carry a roll in all of my vehicles and have several stashed around my farm. That stuff is a life saver.

 

100% on those Maxipads. In VN our first aid kits had bandages that looked similar to Maxipads. They would soak up some blood. We also used to tape them in the shoulder of our shooting jacket. After a couple hundred rounds of 7.62 your shoulder begins to hurt. That Maxi pad cushioned the recoil. B)

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Hydrogen peroxide, and something like a needle to help dig splinters out. Paper towels and whatever tape is handy for bandages. Maybe some extra shoes for running around in circles and screaming.

Brian

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Tweezers, band-aids, and steri-strips are my must-haves. I'm lucky to have a clinic nearby, and they have stitched up bigger cuts for me a time or two. I would like to get a suture kit to have around, as I think I could probably stitch myself up if I had to.

 

Also, I have my Grandma's old "eye cup", used for eye washes...works great for getting pesky grit out of one's eye orbit.

 

Prickly pear pads (skinned, and sliced in half to expose the juicy innards) work just about as well as aloe vera gel on burns. I usually just ignore minor burns, though.

Edited by Orien M

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Thanks to all who responded! Also, another plug for the liquid bandage. I had a cut, on the tip of my right hand pinky finger, it was a slicing type cut and left a flap of skin. The cut itself was about 1cm long and maybe 5mm or so deep. With nothing to hold the wound closed and just the liquid bandage it was healed shut after 1 week. In spite of the fact that I work in a dusty, dirty, warehouse where I typically touch about 1000 to 1400 boxes daily. As far as the contents of a shop first aid kit, I've posted a list below.

 

 

Blunt Tip Scissors

Sharp Tip Scissors

Blunt tweezers

Sharp tweezers

Needles (to remove splinters & for sutures)

Stretchable Bandage (Coban, Ace Bandage, Etc.)

Tourniquet

 

Eye Wash or Saline Solution

Iodine or Betadine

Antibiotic Ointment

Burn Cream

Topical Analgesic

Butterfly Closures

Styptic Powder

Absorbable Sutures (if you need non-absorbable type you probably should see a doctor!?)

Gauze Pads

Non-Stick Sterile Pads

Maxi-Pads

Paper Tape

Plastic Tape (Electrical or Duct Tape, if you prefer!)

Liquid Bandage

Acetaminophen

 

 

Anything glaringly obvious missing?

 

~Bruce~

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a phone to call 911 if anything really bad happens.

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Well, Non-adhesive dressings and tape should also be included in First Aid kit. Sometimes plasters are not the right appearance / dimension to protect an damage, especially large injury or cuts. In this situation, you can use a non-adhesive which properly secured in place with healthcare record.

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Super glue......saved me a few stitches a time or two, but it burns like the dickens! Just close the cut as best as you can an apply as thin of a line as possible while still covering the cut. Itll hold for a good while and just peel off when you need it to.

 

Finger splints, who HASN'T had an accident and broken that pinky or your bird finger?

 

And my last suggestion as was others....an aloe plant. Burns happen to the best of us.

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to add to my last post, there are APPARENTLY different kinds of aloe or something cuz mine kinda sux. First time using it, but some grease came out of the frying pan last night and landed on my foot and it didn't seem to want to draw the burn out like plants I have had in the past. Its young, so that might have something to do with it too, but I'm posting anyways just so its out there. I'm going to get several different kinds and do some comparisons in the future.

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Yarrow - Easy to identify and once you use it, you will swear by it. The scientific name is Achillea millefolium, meaning a thousand flowers of Achilles. It was carried by warriors and armies for thousands of years. It stops bleeding and starts healing far better than you would believe.

 

Achillea_millefolium__Common_Yarrow.jpg

 

Learn it, it is very common and is very easy to identify. The leaves will remind you of capillaries. You can use it fresh or dry it. I keep it around always. It is better than anything you can buy and it's free.

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black tape

 

and i'm a big fan of those new band aid's for burns... their clear looking and have this gel in them... I've burnt myself good a couple times ... n i couldn't believe how they'd cut the pain n heal quick

 

the more stuff you have the better

 

G

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Liquid Bandage is absolutely priceless! The stuff that is specifically sold for professional medical use is best, but over the counter medical use is still really effective. Good old hardware store Cyanoacrylate (SuperGlue) works fairly well, but some of the brand name versions are putting in additives to make it harder to glue your fingers together by accident, but that also means it doesn't work nearly as well on cuts. For the tool box, I buy Loctite Liquid Cyanoacrylate because it is consistently thin enough to flow all the way into checks, cracks etc. and if I need it for a cut I know it will bond skin on contact.

Aloe plants are good for burns, but it gets too cold in winter and not enough sun year round to keep them alive inside the shop, so they stay in the house. My first aid kit actually in the shop has BurnJel PLUS, and a second bottle in the house first aid kit... I got sold on this stuff when I was working on my wife's car in a Wal-Mart parking lot and touched my forearm to the exhaust manifold right where it exits the engine. The pharmacist told me to try BurnJel instead of the Aloe gel I was about to buy. It stopped the burn progression and the pain even faster than fresh Aloe. Active ingredient is the anesthetic Lidocaine 2.5%, but it also has tea tree oil, vitamin E and a few other "active inactive" ingredients in a sterile aqueous glycerine base (no alcohol). Unfortunately, it is getting harder to find anyone that stocks it for some reason:

BurnJel.jpg

I generally second everything on Bruce's list, plus a few hemostats (clamping tweezers in surgical and suture kits).

 

In addition to all the above, a friend of mine who used to be an EMT always suggested some maxi-pads. Don't laugh, they soak up blood and provide protection for serious cuts and other blood-loss events and can be easily taped down.

A Marine Corps medic I work with had everyone in his units (2 tours of Iraq and 1 in Afghanistan) carry tampons to stop bleeding in "puncture" type wounds when bandaging the surface wasn't gonna do it. Saved at least a couple lives with 'em too. I haven't quite felt the need to keep those in the shop, but I suppose a buffer could theoretically throw a thin blade just right for them to come in handy...

James

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black tape

 

and i'm a big fan of those new band aid's for burns... their clear looking and have this gel in them... I've burnt myself good a couple times ... n i couldn't believe how they'd cut the pain n heal quick

 

the more stuff you have the better

 

G

Yup, those burn treatment band aids are BurnJel...I don't make it, sell it or get any kind of kickbacks on it either :wacko: .

James

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Medical tape. Especially if I'm doing intricate woodwork or filing where I have to use a very coarse file or a rasp. I tape up my hands in spots where whatever tool I'm using is likely to cut/abrade me (more of a preventative measure I guess). Of course, gloves would work, but they don't offer nearly as much dexterity, and I can't feel whatever I'm working on, which I really don't like. I also use it, sometimes with some paper towel, to quickly tape up cuts. I don't like the bandaid sticking off my finger either, and with tape I don't get that floppy falling off effect that is so common with bandaids. I also like to have butterfly closures for bigger cuts, but I generally keep them in

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Medical tape. Especially if I'm doing intricate woodwork or filing where I have to use a very coarse file or a rasp. I tape up my hands in spots where whatever tool I'm using is likely to cut/abrade me (more of a preventative measure I guess). Of course, gloves would work, but they don't offer nearly as much dexterity, and I can't feel whatever I'm working on, which I really don't like. I also use it, sometimes with some paper towel, to quickly tape up cuts. I don't like the bandaid sticking off my finger either, and with tape I don't get that floppy falling off effect that is so common with bandaids. I also like to have butterfly closures for bigger cuts, but I generally keep them in the house so I don't lose them.

 

-Dan

I've never used it, but Lee Valley sells friction tape for this sort of application.

 

I'm personally a fan of cloth bandages over the plastic backed ones. They stick better to your skin, and hold up better when you're working. Electrical tape is a good emergency backup too. Supposedly the manufacturers add iodine to the electrical tape for antibiotic properties just for that reason.

 

 

Simon

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