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B. Norris

First Aid Kit MUST HAVES

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Clumsy me, I have had occasion to use a tampon and another occasion a thin Mini-pad sanitary napkin. They are individually wrapped and stay clean, though not exactly sterile. Both are specifically made to absorb LOTS of blood. I keep some in the shop and in my hunting first aid fanny pack. Combine either with good quality athletic tape and you have a great fast compression bandage. There is at least one ER doctor in Colorado that was impressed with the idea as he was stitching up my hand.

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Anyone have an idea how long liquids last if you're not using them? How often do you have to change them out? What's the shelf-life of neosporin, for example? How do temp/humidity fluctuations impact them? Is the year-old stuff in your traveling kit any good?

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A tip from the last time I had to go visit an opthalmologist... A powerful rare earth magnet can save lots of money and hassle, used to remove metal particles from the eye. You may be able to save an, expensive, trip to the doctor this way.

 

~Bruce~

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Neosporin has the expiration date molded into the tube at the base. It's usually good for two to three years based on that date, but I have used out-of-date Neosporin with no problems. I know some chemicals degrade over time, I just don't know which ones, sorry.

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Anyone have an idea how long liquids last if you're not using them? How often do you have to change them out? What's the shelf-life of neosporin, for example? How do temp/humidity fluctuations impact them? Is the year-old stuff in your traveling kit any good?

 

The expiration date is not necessarily when the item is no longer useable. Drug Expiration Dates - Are They Still Safe to Take? Drug companies stand to benefit from short expiration dates upon the products they sell and there is nothing preventing them from setting the date short. Ultimately, it is your body and your decision but, as with everything else in this world, Caveat Emptor prevails. A lot of it will depend on factors such as "did you open the tube of Neosporin or, is it un-opened?" Oxygen can, potentially, get in there and react with the active ingredients. A container that was opened 3 years ago may not be good but, the un-opened 3 year old container may. The article I linked to above has some good guidlines about certain types of medications to not mess around with and which types should be okay.

 

~Bruce~

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I've never used it, but Lee Valley sells friction tape for this sort of application.

 

I'm personally a fan of cloth bandages over the plastic backed ones. They stick better to your skin, and hold up better when you're working. Electrical tape is a good emergency backup too. Supposedly the manufacturers add iodine to the electrical tape for antibiotic properties just for that reason.

 

 

Simon

Look up green bantex gauze tape. This stuff is the bomb! Only sticks to itself, and after being on your fingers/hands for a while, becomes sort of a rubbery texture that stiffens up and gives great support. I used to use it in factory work that would have torn my fingers to shreds, but it kept me in one piece lol.

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