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So, for the most part I've been using a Lanskys system to sharpen my knives, and while it works well, it just doesn't work for big knives. So for the larger ones I've been using a big hardware store stone I got 2 years ago, and some old fine stone I found in my dads barn.

 

But, as these two are starting to wear out, I've decided I need to look into investing in some new and good stones. I've done some looking around, but there don't seem to be a large amount of threads hanging around about them, and I'm still kind of confused about them. So.....

 

#1 - Oil or Water? I understand this can be kind of like asking press or powerhammer, but I'm interested in seeing what people have to say about it.

I've never used waterstones, only oil, so I can't really use my own experience, but it seems like might be nice not to have to worry about the oil getting onto my handle and messing it up and such, but again, it's just an impression, I have no experience with waterstones.

 

 

#2 - How many? I don't have much money, so I can't afford to get the best collection out there, I just want some stones I can use to get my knives good and shaving sharp. It seems like 3-4 stones seems to be typical, but I'm not really sure.

 

 

 

#3 - Where? I've done some looking around, but since I'm still not sure exactly what I'm looking for, it's hard to price well. But it does seem like woodworking stores are going to be a common place to get them. So, where do you purchase your reasonably priced stones? (links would be handy, but a name will work as well).

 

 

 

 

Thanks guys, I don't know where I'd be without ya'll.

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I sharpen on my belt grinder. Establish the secondary bevel with about a 400 grit belt, then put in a fine belt (REALLY fine ~1000+grit) and get the burr up. Then carefully buff the burr off. This produces a very sharp, easy-to-do edge.

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I use a worn out 320 belt running 1/2 speed then finish with an oval diamond stick. the oval lets you catch more blade closer to the choil.

Edited by B Finnigan
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Synthetic Japanese waterstones-No question

 

Get it relatively sharp on a belt then 1000 grit $27.50 at Japan Woodworker

01.097.10.jpg

 

Then 6000 grit at $31 at JW as well

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and you are done.

 

People will tell you you need an intermediate stone like a 3000 $34

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and that is fine if you want makes for less time on the 6000. But you can set the bevel (flat) on a 1000- polish in the 6000- shave hair.

 

You can spend $1000s on stones if you want and to be fair there are many levels and refinements of sharp particularly with the razor guys and die hard kitchen knife people.

 

But these two stones-3 if you go for the 3000 will shave hair, slice tomatoes like nobodys business and plane wood to a glass like finish.

 

Keep them flat with plate glass and silicon carbide wet or dry paper.

Edited by Danocon
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I sharpen my knives like Luke does on the belt grinder. You can get it scary sharp. It works very well especially for large knives.

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I use almost the same proceedures that Danocon uses. I don't have a belt grinder so I can't attest to it's ability to sgarpen an edge but others who do use a grinder swear by it. Japanese Woodworker is a great source for water stones. I also have a Norton professional tri-hone with three india stones which I have used for about 20 years. It is a oil stone and works very well.

My link

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oil... yucky, messy cept with a hard ark (then its good )

 

i like what Danocon said, as thats what i like to do aswell... mostly king stones

 

 

and i like diasharps continuous diamond stones .. ... its funny but sometimes your sharpening and it seems like nothing is happening... so i'll switch to a diamond stone and that will dependably move you along... think i became really impressed with those diasharps as i've used them for a couple years to sharpen gravers ( and they work wonderfully )

 

and don't forget to strop on an oak board with the micron diamond paste dmt at the end.... believe me, that will give you that certain impressive quality to the edge

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I think Danocon is right on the money. I use King stones for all my general sharpening. I also use the Norton Waterstone carousel. I probably would'nt have bought it because of the price but, received it as a gift. It sharpens very well also.

 

The most important step for me is stropping after using stones. I have a 2' strop i use with koyo 1 strop compound, works miracles.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I, personally, think that diamond stones are the best all around. If I only sharpened non-stainless knives I'd go with the waterstones but, for stainless steels I much prefer the diamonds. In my experience nothing works faster than the diamonds and as I'm not the best at sharpening, faster means better results because, I don't round the bevels over as much.

 

~Bruce~

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