Jump to content

Near completed knife WIP


Recommended Posts

Well, after thought and consideration, here it is, not quite complete, but near.

I dont know what my inspiration really is, but i do know i like where this is going.

Most all finishing was done with basic hand-tools.

529544_2807742963843_1566750094_31982865_262508349_n.jpg

532326_2807730323527_1566750094_31982827_1500458443_n.jpg523682_2807730523532_1566750094_31982828_1392398376_n.jpg

521808_2807730803539_1566750094_31982829_1464989664_n.jpg564935_2807731163548_1566750094_31982830_1032498350_n.jpg

 

Anyone know what kind of wood this is? all i know is its a PITA to work with.

 

547644_2807731403554_1566750094_31982831_929979713_n.jpg548644_2807731723562_1566750094_31982832_379346596_n.jpg

535761_2807732003569_1566750094_31982833_2006246572_n.jpg563289_2807732243575_1566750094_31982834_186189802_n.jpg

536969_2807732563583_1566750094_31982835_1772433200_n.jpg545023_2807732963593_1566750094_31982836_1731447044_n.jpg

531000_2807733203599_1566750094_31982837_351178868_n.jpg556249_2807733523607_1566750094_31982838_191195593_n.jpg

398300_2807733923617_1566750094_31982839_1592889867_n.jpg549950_2807734283626_1566750094_31982840_120233647_n.jpg

559074_2807734443630_1566750094_31982841_831513786_n.jpg403968_2807734563633_1566750094_31982842_7743029_n.jpg

306002_2807734803639_1566750094_31982843_1019537754_n.jpg392492_2807734923642_1566750094_31982844_1197360680_n.jpg

"Pour Bien Desirer"

Alpha Tester for "Chivalry: Medieval Warfare"

Link to post
Share on other sites

A REAL man works in a kilt :lol: .

 

To use a socratic approach, how do you like what you've done? Does it match the picture you had in your head? What would you do differently next time? These are some of the questions I keep in mind with every project.

 

Geoff

"The worst day smithing is better than the best day working for someone else."

 

I said that.

 

If a thing is worth doing, it is worth doing badly.

- - -G. K. Chesterton

 

So, just for the record: the fact that it does work still should not be taken as definitive proof that you are not crazy.

 

Grant Sarver

Link to post
Share on other sites

looks like somthing for the maple family, but I cant swear to that

~M~

Member:

Cal Knives

Practioner:

Suio Ryu Iai Kenpo

Link to post
Share on other sites

A REAL man works in a kilt :lol: .

 

To use a socratic approach, how do you like what you've done? Does it match the picture you had in your head? What would you do differently next time? These are some of the questions I keep in mind with every project.

 

Geoff

 

Haha, kilts... I dont have one :(

It kinda does, I would use the ball side of a ball-pien hammer to give it a more 'hammered' appearance, and i would try to knock off more scale in that case, maybe, maybe not. This would have been alot easier if i had a belt grinder >.<

 

looks like somthing for the maple family, but I cant swear to that

~M~

 

I thought it was maple myself based upon the bark, but never having worked with maple before, i am uncertain myself.

"Pour Bien Desirer"

Alpha Tester for "Chivalry: Medieval Warfare"

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like how it turned out. It has a primeval, rustic look that is showcased really well in the pictures. I agree with Geoff..Ask yourself a few questions about it all. Nice work.

 

John

Not all those who wander are lost. -J.R.R. Tolkien

-Shards of the Dark Age- my blog
-Nine Worlds Workshop-
-Last Apocalypse Forge-

Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks like either osage or mulberry to me. Is it ring porous? I could be wrong on both guesses of course.

 

I have NO idea what that means, these trees were planted here in the mojave desert in a housing area, i doubt it would be either.

 

I like how it turned out. It has a primeval, rustic look that is showcased really well in the pictures. I agree with Geoff..Ask yourself a few questions about it all. Nice work.

 

John

 

Thanks! I still have much work to do

"Pour Bien Desirer"

Alpha Tester for "Chivalry: Medieval Warfare"

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice.

 

My guess on the wood is also either osage or mulberry, leaning more towards mulberry.

"A country boy can survive" - Hank Williams Jr.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think your passion will serve you well, if you stick with it. This one has sort of a "pirate tanto" feel to me, and while there are several things you can do better, you've certainly got the basic idea of knifemaking.

 

Tai Goo had a list, the "10 basics of bladesmithing" which I printed out a long time ago, and try to adhere to. The first 2 points are the most important, I think, and they are 1) Blade Concept, and 2) Steel selection.

 

These happen before you ever light the forge. You don't need to be a great artist (lord knows I'm not) but having a clear idea of what you want to make will save you time and frustration, and is important in meeting your goals and clarifying your progression in various shop skills. I either doodle the blade I want to make on paper, or even sketch on the anvil with soapstone, to put a basic shape to the thing I want to make, make sure the proportions look right to me, and give me something to compare the hot work to in process.

 

Once you have a plan, choosing material for the job is important. I know you're struggling with "found" steel, and recycling whatever comes your way, but knife steel (per knife) is really cheap, couple of bucks per blade for clean material from any number of sources, though Aldo is my preferred. You know what it's critical temperatures are. You know how to heat treat it. There are hundreds of people who've worked it before and can offer their perspective on it. There are extensive photographs of how it can be finished.

 

 

 

Like you, I spent a year "letting the steel do what it wanted", but I realized later that it was a cheap excuse for not taking control of my craft, and my material, and owning up to my own skill with a hammer. A proper "hammer finish" should be almost perfectly flat, without sanding or scraping. Tim Lively has a great tradition of these sorts of blades, if you're curious about following his path. Rough texture, leftover scratches from heavy files or paper, and sharp angles all provide stress points in your heat treat and are unsightly to the eye. A good smith can make a "rustic" looking blade, but only if he chooses to, not because he's incapable of making a finely finished product... and it's more a surface treatment after a clean blade is forged and ground, than something left unfinished.

 

I would look at this blade as a learning tool, the way I look at every blade I ever make. Find one thing you don't like about it, and fix that in your next blade. Then find something else you don't like, and fix it in the one after that. Eventually the things you dislike about your work get smaller and more subtle, and your quality goes up... But always be a student of your own dissatisfaction.

The Tidewater Forge

Christopher Price, Bladesmith

Link to post
Share on other sites

i found out its mulberry

And thanks Chris, I have about 5,000 weapon sketches ive made over the years (yea, ive been smithing in my dreams for over a decade lol)

I see them, i just cant put them to paper very well :(

But I hear ya, My dad wants a BEEFY utility knife with a tanto tip. I was thinking a re-curve, but thats a little beyond my tools to finish that edge as I want to make it.

Ill paracord the grip. Ill post the progress on that as I go.

That will be my 'real' knife, from start to finish, It will be controlled.

The only temperature control i have is with the oven for ht.

When it comes to quenching, I have a powerful magnet on that barrel i use. I heat till its barely magnetic, bring the heat up a little more, then quench. I use water first. If its not hard then, i switch mediums.

 

someone asked me a question yesterday.

Where did blacksmithing start? As in, who discovered Iron.

"Pour Bien Desirer"

Alpha Tester for "Chivalry: Medieval Warfare"

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would start quenching in warm oil, it's much more forgiving than water - and nothing readily available will quench harder than water. Your spikes may lack sufficient carbon to harden properly, which is why I recommend good, known steel so you don't waste time on things that won't do what you'd like them to.

 

There are others who can comment on the origins of iron better than I, but there's plenty of mythology surrounding it. The very very short answer is that it was probably independently discovered in several parts of the world around 2500-3500 years ago, lost, rediscovered, and so on until a sustainable culture of it's knowledge propagated enough to support its growth.

The Tidewater Forge

Christopher Price, Bladesmith

Link to post
Share on other sites
someone asked me a question yesterday.

Where did blacksmithing start? As in, who discovered Iron.

 

Current best knowledge is as Chris said, with the centers in what is now the Middle East (northern Iraq/Syria/Turkey) and China. Folks had been working bronze for over a thousand years by then, and to do that you must have learned to smelt copper and tin.

 

Certain types of copper deposits form as sulphide ores in a vertical seam. With these deposits one finds iron sulphide, or pyrite. This is not usable as an ore on its own. However, on top of these massive ore bodies is a layer of weathered ore from which the sulphur has been leached by rain and groundwater over a few million years. This is called a Gossan cap, and usually consists of fairly rich iron ore and sometimes some copper minerals.

 

Here's where my personal theory comes in: If you are trying to smelt the copper and you don't grab the right rock off the deposit, you may well get iron. It won't be great iron, and if you've never seen it or tried to work it before it would be a very confusing substance compared to copper. But let's just say out of frustration you hammer out a chunk of that spongy black crap to see if there's any copper in it (freshly-smelted copper bloom is black if the atmosphere is wrong) and you find out it is workable by hot-forging to consolidate, and can then be cold-worked a bit just like the copper alloys you're used to. At some point you might notice that the cold-worked iron stuff is a bit harder than the copper you've been using... :ph34r: It just needs to be worked hot first, and you can't cast it like bronze because you didn't figure out how, unless you are Chinese, in which case you went straight from bronze to cast iron and only bothered with that wrought iron stuff a little later...

 

Give it another thousand to fifteen hundred years and somebody figured out that some kinds of iron would harden a LOT more if water-quenched while hot... :blink:

 

And as Chris said, that's the VERY VERY short version with some personal ideas thrown in. It's really hard to tell about very early iron because it tends to rust away completely, so we have to look for the slags and certain chemical signatures in the soils to see if iron may have even been present.

 

Then there's always meteoric iron that can be pounded out cold and doesn't work-harden much at all, so if you're from a culture used to pounding on rocks to see if they are useful you might use it for certain types of tool. Like, oh, certain Inuit and Athabaskan groups of the North American Arctic (among others worldwide) were doing well before meeting any Europeans or Chinese, depending on which side of the continent they lived on.

 

Doesn't help you much with your knife skills, but it's a fun story. B)

 

For knife work, the classic noob way is to "let the steel become what it wants on the anvil" rather than starting with a clear idea of what you want it to look like. The other noob thing is to strongly defend the rough-hammered blade as a testament to how it was made. As others have said, there is no shame in a good forge finish at all, quite the contrary. However, it has to be a GOOD forge finish. That's why my early blades and such were ground and polished. ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

This knife has an amazing temper on it if I do say so myself

I could pry open the door to your house with this if I wanted, I ripped the hinges off a tool cabinet with it last night.

I deflected the blade around 45 degrees with NO deformation to the blade. I THREW this into the concrete, only light scratches.

So please dont tell me something that sparks like tool steel, isnt high enough carbon to harden.

You use tool steel to make knives, why cant I?

(this sparks higher in content than a rr spike)

and my blades are quite thick. I make my edges quite thick before treating, If it cracks in the water, oh well. Ill either make it shorter, or make another.

its not a concern to me.

I had to maintain a shape with this forging, If i let it 'go do its thing' so freely as you all speculate, and it came out this straight, be very afraid that I can do that by sheeer will.

I had to control the metal, do NOT get that wrong. When I say 'let it form' I mean, i had little clue as to how far the blade would be drawn out. If i knew how to forge weld, I would have made this blade short and fat.

which i will teach myself how to forge weld.

Im the only friggin smith in this god-forsaken town, or anywhere within an hour's drive.

unless someone is holding out on me! >.<

 

Fyi, i take noob extremely offensively. I am a beginner. thats all you need to title me.

 

I made this blade with 10 stiches in my right index finger. If you have done the very same, let me know. Ill congradulate you, as you deserve

"Pour Bien Desirer"

Alpha Tester for "Chivalry: Medieval Warfare"

Link to post
Share on other sites

Eric, people like myself have been trying to help you, and you continue to take offense at minor word choices. If you don't display a little gratitude for the knowledge people try to share with you, that knowledge will dry up really fast. Consider this your last lesson from me.

The Tidewater Forge

Christopher Price, Bladesmith

Link to post
Share on other sites

hold on, I said that I had the idea in my head, just because it isnt down on paper with dimensions doesnt mean that I dont know what i am working towards.

You are defending something that has nothing to do with yourself. I simply have an issue with 'noob'.

I never once said that i didnt take your wisdom to heart. I read what I can, anything that has to do with how y'all work metal, to finishing.

I take it all in, matter of fact, i watched a video from someone on here, cant remember who, but I used his techniques to make the profile of the knife (tip/tang etc.)

You assume much chris.

"Pour Bien Desirer"

Alpha Tester for "Chivalry: Medieval Warfare"

Link to post
Share on other sites

hold on, I said that I had the idea in my head, just because it isnt down on paper with dimensions doesnt mean that I dont know what i am working towards.

 

Is this not what you had to say about it in the other thread?

 

Thanks much! I thought it came out quite well (considering i knew what i wanted from a tang standpoint, but i let the metal form the blade under me hammer, ergo, no blade planning what-so-ever. Just I know i wanted a peen on the pommel like a sword)

 

If I have made a mistake, and that blade is not the same as this one, then you have my apology. Otherwise, own up to what you said.

 

 

 

You are defending something that has nothing to do with yourself. I simply have an issue with 'noob'.

 

I consider Alan a close, personal friend, and he has my utmost respect. If you can't see the difference between a "noob act", as he describes, and yourself, the problem is yours. He didn't make it personal, you did.

 

 

 

I never once said that i didnt take your wisdom to heart. I read what I can, anything that has to do with how y'all work metal, to finishing.

I take it all in, matter of fact, i watched a video from someone on here, cant remember who, but I used his techniques to make the profile of the knife (tip/tang etc.)

You assume much chris.

 

I hope what you say is true, and don't doubt for a minute that you have a deep passion for the craft. That has never been in question. What is getting old is your constant display of an attitude that comes across as angry, demanding of respect that you haven't earned yet here, and dismissive of those who share their knowledge. Even your comment above which blows off the name of the person you learned something from, is suggestive of this. I like to think I do a good job of being fair and generous, and work only with what you put out there. Even at the hammer-in this weekend, you were spoken of. I declared you full of potential, if you learn to settle down your attitude a bit.

 

 

I seriously considered just ignoring you from this point on, but I can't shake the urge to be helpful and extend a hand of fellowship, even if I find it hard. I can tell you that more than one admin is just waiting for a chance to ban you because of your poor attitude. Consider yourself warned, and consider yourself welcome if you decide to take this group seriously. It's not your average internet forum, this place is chock full of people who go waaaaay out of their way to meet each other, treat each other with respect and a professional attitude, and lift up those who demonstrate themselves to be serious and respectful. Nobody owes anyone anything here, and the information and knowledge that gets passed down is a gift unlike any other. I guarantee that you'll not find a more generous crowd anywhere else on the net, and I urge you not to squander it.

The Tidewater Forge

Christopher Price, Bladesmith

Link to post
Share on other sites

Is this not what you had to say about it in the other thread?

 

 

 

If I have made a mistake, and that blade is not the same as this one, then you have my apology. Otherwise, own up to what you said.

 

 

 

 

 

I consider Alan a close, personal friend, and he has my utmost respect. If you can't see the difference between a "noob act", as he describes, and yourself, the problem is yours. He didn't make it personal, you did.

 

 

 

 

 

I hope what you say is true, and don't doubt for a minute that you have a deep passion for the craft. That has never been in question. What is getting old is your constant display of an attitude that comes across as angry, demanding of respect that you haven't earned yet here, and dismissive of those who share their knowledge. Even your comment above which blows off the name of the person you learned something from, is suggestive of this. I like to think I do a good job of being fair and generous, and work only with what you put out there. Even at the hammer-in this weekend, you were spoken of. I declared you full of potential, if you learn to settle down your attitude a bit.

 

 

I seriously considered just ignoring you from this point on, but I can't shake the urge to be helpful and extend a hand of fellowship, even if I find it hard. I can tell you that more than one admin is just waiting for a chance to ban you because of your poor attitude. Consider yourself warned, and consider yourself welcome if you decide to take this group seriously. It's not your average internet forum, this place is chock full of people who go waaaaay out of their way to meet each other, treat each other with respect and a professional attitude, and lift up those who demonstrate themselves to be serious and respectful. Nobody owes anyone anything here, and the information and knowledge that gets passed down is a gift unlike any other. I guarantee that you'll not find a more generous crowd anywhere else on the net, and I urge you not to squander it.

 

 

If i have come across as an angry individual in general, I am nothing but sorry for that.

I let my frustration get the best of me, and I will admit, good friend or not, noob is not a nice thing to say to someone Chris. I tried to put it as clearly as possible without raging, that I wont stand for being called a noob. I am a beginner, no? Beginners make mistakes. Noob is a disrespectful and derogatory term. In-experienced people, or those with no formal training, will make the mistake of trying to impress others.

I am not here for respect, there shouldnt be any for me but as a fellow human being.

I am nothing, dirt, shit if you will, compared to even a ferrier.

I feel as though I am being dismissed in your typings as 'just another wannabe'.

Yes, I said that I let the blade form itself, why? Because I wanted..... to impress people. I just want everyone to say its nice, THEN tell me how I could improve my craft.

Thats all I want, Recognition, I get none.

My father critiques, and tells me to be safer, wear face-shields, and I need to become a true master before he wants a knife :(

My wife hates it, gets into a fight with me about it regularly.

And my co-workers and so called 'friends' are looking for flaws to dismiss me with.

The same thing happened in ren-faire events, so i put together the nicest period outfits to ever be seen, just so someone would say, wow, i like that, thats nice.

I cant really get that here, And i dont know why I expect it.

I mean, just look at any other person's work.

Maybe i just need to not be on here for a nother few years or a decade, whatever it takes.

I cant compare, and its just gonna get more frustrating.

I do not believe I will ever meet anyone on here other than the time I spent watching Lee work.

And i severely doubt I will ever see his workshop in person again.

As Sir Blackwolf put it, Its our job to be behind the scenes..

Im sorry ive squandered my time here.

ban me if you like.

maybe its for the better

"Pour Bien Desirer"

Alpha Tester for "Chivalry: Medieval Warfare"

Link to post
Share on other sites

One more time...

 

 

 

You are welcome here. You are encouraged to learn and grow here. You are given priceless information here.

 

 

 

All I am suggesting, is that you see that for what it is. This isn't a place where people will lie to you, to make you feel better. They will honestly critique your work, so that you may improve it. One of the best lessons I ever got at your age, was to separate your ego from your work - to comment on something you make, that's not commenting on your character or person. I'm sure you're a great guy, and I've tried to compliment your energy, drive, and vision. Your skills will take time to develop, sure, but don't let that be mistaken for criticism of you. I'm capable of terrible work, and when someone points it out to me I don't take it personally, because I have the potential to do really great stuff - I just might have had a bad day, made a noob mistake, or rushed through a process. It's not me they're attacking, it's the thing I did, and I would have it no other way because without that kind of feedback I'll never get better. I didn't realize you were so frustrated from other directions, and apologize for the added stress my words have caused you.

 

 

This is why internet communication is so frustrating, because we only have the written words to go by, and all the subtle nuance of tone, inflection, and meaning, is lost. If we were face to face this would have been over a week ago. I'm sorry for dragging it out, but I'm trying to help you. Maybe I should be the one to just back off and be quiet.

The Tidewater Forge

Christopher Price, Bladesmith

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...