Jump to content

Sword Fuller Grinding Jig


Recommended Posts

Hi All,

 

I'm working on a damascus, Oakeshott XII sword that calls for a fuller 3/4's of the way down the blade.

 

In the past I have struggled with grinding straight sword fullers on double edged weapons. The biggest challenge I've had is ensuring that the depth of the fuller is uniform. If a fuller is of uneven depth then it creates uneven, wavy grind lines. I experienced this first hand when I worked on Ealdric.

 

So, I've been scratching my head for a while on how I could "dummy proof" my fuller grinds. I seem to have found a good solution, so I thought I would share it.

 

The concept is pretty simple once I thought of it.

 

1: Clamp the blade to a piece of angle iron. This ensures the blade will make contact at a consistent angle and will remain level.

 

2: Position your work platen such that it places the apex of the grinding wheel approximately 1/2 way up the base of the blade.

 

3: Previously you will need to have marked the center line of the blade with a sharpy. Place the angle iron on the platen and adjust the rear and forward C clamps holding the ends of the blade until the blade is held at an angle that will touch the apex of the grind wheel on the marked center line at both ends of the blade. A good way to do this is just scratch the blade along the stopped wheel. Coarse grit belts leave a scratch mark as you do this that will show you the line of the grind.

 

4: Determine the depth the fuller, in my case 3/32". Position a thin "stopper" across the platen under the grind wheel such that when the depth of the grind is achieved, the bottom of the angle iron will touch it, preventing you from going any deeper in your grind.

 

Place it on the platen and grind until no more sparks show up.

<table style="width:auto;"><tr><td><a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/edkY48ZVONvmUfkWiL6ZxXZkL3Rmpf9jiFbL4yLaY9A?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-2C2kygJNhyU/T3irVyR5KHI/AAAAAAAACBo/8GXPoS4B794/s800/IMG_0649.JPG" height="600" width="800" /></a></td></tr><tr><td style="font-family:arial,sans-serif; font-size:11px; text-align:right">From <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/DaveStephens907/OkenshottXII?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCIWnvM-OkrSKgAE&feat=embedwebsite">Okenshott XII</a></td></tr></table>



<table style="width:auto;"><tr><td><a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/gKn6nhQsDf2R_seR2bxTkXZkL3Rmpf9jiFbL4yLaY9A?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-kC7MaEOXynA/T3irX7s5cGI/AAAAAAAACBw/nDSSWwpxtx8/s800/IMG_0651.JPG" height="600" width="800" /></a></td></tr><tr><td style="font-family:arial,sans-serif; font-size:11px; text-align:right">From <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/DaveStephens907/OkenshottXII?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCIWnvM-OkrSKgAE&feat=embedwebsite">Okenshott XII</a></td></tr></table>



First try worked pretty well! The taper on the fuller toward the front should develop as I grind the edges and distal taper.



<table style="width:auto;"><tr><td><a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/KfQWyf_5yz1Dw4_Vj-kLznZkL3Rmpf9jiFbL4yLaY9A?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-_srWc8WwroY/T3irPc-gAiI/AAAAAAAACBg/Nu3vHqlN8DE/s800/IMG_0654.JPG" height="600" width="800" /></a></td></tr><tr><td style="font-family:arial,sans-serif; font-size:11px; text-align:right">From <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/DaveStephens907/OkenshottXII?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCIWnvM-OkrSKgAE&feat=embedwebsite">Okenshott XII</a></td></tr></table>

 

Hope this helps others. Let me know if you have any questions or suggestions.

 

Dave

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dave,

 

that jig looks really useful.

 

I tried clamping a sword to angle iron and moving it over the table before but ran into several problems with that. For the sword I tried this on, I had forged in the bevels and some distal taper to the tip. When I clamped the sword to the angle iron, I noticed that clamping at the tip caused the sword to be under tension and the middle started bowing out. The middle section of the sword was supposedly ground flat :) Since there did not seem an easy way to fix, I went back to grinding the fullers by hand.

 

Your sword looks like it's pretty flat and has good contact to the angle iron everywhere?

 

Niels.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Dave,

 

that jig looks really useful.

 

I tried clamping a sword to angle iron and moving it over the table before but ran into several problems with that. For the sword I tried this on, I had forged in the bevels and some distal taper to the tip. When I clamped the sword to the angle iron, I noticed that clamping at the tip caused the sword to be under tension and the middle started bowing out. The middle section of the sword was supposedly ground flat :) Since there did not seem an easy way to fix, I went back to grinding the fullers by hand.

 

Your sword looks like it's pretty flat and has good contact to the angle iron everywhere?

 

Niels.

 

You might try some kind of wooden or metal shim to match the distal taper toward the tip(?) Never tried it, but sounds feasible.

Link to post
Share on other sites

This is awesome Dave, I was thinking of trying something similar after I freehanded my last fuller... it turned out alright but was certainly not flawless and probably the most stressful part of making my sword. Your fuller looks fantastic and I'm super excited to see your sword! I assume you mean Oakeshott?

 

Thanks for sharing this and not keeping it a "trade secret" :) The craft is growing and we all need to share a little!

 

Keep up the awesome work and I can't wait to see your conference in June! I will be watching with bated breath (or dripping drool) and I daresay I won't be alone.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I assume you mean Oakeshott?

 

 

Uh . . . right. Him. :lol:

 

It's based on the Albion sword called "The Knight." Peter Johnsson designed it, I believe. http://www.albion-swords.com/swords/albion/nextgen/sword-medieval-knight-xii.htm

 

Just came in from the shop and finished up the rough grind on it. The fullers seemed to grind pretty well.

 

<table style="width:auto;"><tr><td><a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/Jn8gtjP3VXp_xfFhiJ7lrHZkL3Rmpf9jiFbL4yLaY9A?feat=embedwebsite"><img src="https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-9bIebccvAbU/T3jfGON-xKI/AAAAAAAACB4/jkdz6Nbx-qg/s800/IMG_0661.JPG" height="800" width="691" /></a></td></tr><tr><td style="font-family:arial,sans-serif; font-size:11px; text-align:right">From <a href="https://picasaweb.google.com/DaveStephens907/OkenshottXII?authuser=0&authkey=Gv1sRgCIWnvM-OkrSKgAE&feat=embedwebsite">Okenshott XII</a></td></tr></table>

 

--Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave... Can you explain what you have going on with your work rest? Is that a whole other KMG base and holder that you have? Was this your own modification??

Link to post
Share on other sites

looks to be a mapp arm, which is an extremely cool feature to have

 

would it be better to keep the steel in a square strip.. then later grind in the tip profile ( just thinking it maybe hard to hold the tip of sword in a solid manner.. or maybe not )

 

Nice Jig

 

G

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nevermind... Just ordered one. That MAP arm is amazing. Thanks for indirectly causing a giant leap in the capability of my KMG.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nevermind... Just ordered one. That MAP arm is amazing. Thanks for indirectly causing a giant leap in the capability of my KMG.

 

Oh, shoot, I should have mentioned that. Thanks for pointing that out guys.

 

Yeah, I'm using a MAP arm, that allows the work rest to be positioned almost anywhere. They aren't cheap, but they are very useful: http://www.adammichaelknives.com/purchase.php

 

--Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you drill and tap a hole in the angle iron, you can install a nylon bolt that can be adjusted to compensate for distal taper. A series of bolts, say every 6", along the angle iron would allow you to support a long blade or use the same form for blades of various lengths.

 

This is what I did to my sanding jig and it works like a charm without worrying about scratching the blade.

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you drill and tap a hole in the angle iron, you can install a nylon bolt that can be adjusted to compensate for distal taper. A series of bolts, say every 6", along the angle iron would allow you to support a long blade or use the same form for blades of various lengths.

 

This is what I did to my sanding jig and it works like a charm without worrying about scratching the blade.

 

Dang!

 

That, sir, is a BRILLIANT idea.

 

Thanks for the tip. The one thing I had to do by hand on this was grind the end of the fuller due to the distal taper. This would have solved that problem.

 

Awesome. Thanks again.

 

-Dave

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice looking jig, I used something like that in the past, but that is much more fool proof(which is the whole point of a jig).

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave, you and all of those who responded to your topic are simply amazing. I'm not an engineer but I work with a lot of them. You guys figure out what is needed with a minimal amount of research and sometimes simple solutions that work really well. Thanks for all the info. Reading this forum and others in the knife world is a real treat. Good job and thanks for sharing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

To clarify, here's my backer for sanding. Turns out that the rubber is too soft and the blade will really sink in to it when in the vise. I'll be replacing it with thin leather or plain old masking tape in the near future. Still, it works like a charm and I could easily see a longer version with multiple bolts working for swords of every variety.

 

IMG_3839.jpg

IMG_3871.jpg

 

 

Glad I could help, Dave. God knows I owed you one, at least!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi.

I've basically been doing wide fullers like that since the late '90's. I found an issue sometimes was unintentional "rocking" of the setup on the tool rest, so I made a jig which clamps on the tool rest and basically allows you to slide the angle iron back and forth, but prevents any sort of rocking in any direction. A real bonus if your wrists/forearms are tired.

I'll try and take pics tomorrow.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 year later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...