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Hurl Vreeland

How does this look so far for you pro's

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The side rails are 2"x4"x1/4".  The top and bottom pieces are 4"x4"x3/8".  I welded 4"x1/2" plates on top and bottom.  All seams are welded.  The slide has 4"x1/2" plates and beam connecting to the ram is 2 pieces that are 4"x2" for a total 4"x4" unit of steel.  No flex there.  I will weld another 1" thick plate on the I.D. of the upper and lower connectors.  These will be tapped to hold the clevis units for the cylinder.  The overall length is 45".  I wanted to make a tall standing unit and have the ram come down to the work but I'm thinking now of having the ram on the lower end so it comes up to the work.  The height is perfect for that set up.  I think it will feel odd to have the billet coming up to the upper die but I have seen them designed this way and makes for a low profile.  I can always make a stand so that the ram is on top but if those in the "know" say that having the ram come up to the work is less than optimal I will make a stand.  I wanted to make the crossbars envelope the side bars but didnt have the right sized material.  Does this look strong enough?  I know pictures don't say enough and when its done the proof will be the test.

 

Well I wanted to post a photo but it seems I cannot.  I thought I could post directly from my floppy.  When I get it worked out I will post them.

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Looks to be a good solid unit. I just rebuilt mine from 2 by 4 by1/4, it works fine with that metal weight with no fles, the new footprint is 10 by 14" by 32" high. In all honesty, I do think you'd be better still setting the unit so it has the press coming down to the unit, as this does give you a better visual angle of what is happening to your steel.

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Here's a shot of mine- height is 32", width 10", width at base 14".

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I remember seeing somewhere on the net pictures of a press that used a low format (with the ram below where the hot iron sits) but which pulls the upper dies down onto the lower dies (I guess with a double acting cylander there isn't much difference). Or maybe it pushed down but pulled the upper dies behind it, downwards?  It's kind of difficult to describe, does anyone know what I'm talking about?

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Ric Furrer had a press built with the ram below, but the dies still operate standard, ie the top one comes down, kinda like a guillotine design, it's an awesome unit... I'll try and give him a shout and get him to post a pic or two.

 

Hurl, looks good, you lay down a fine bead with the stick. 7018 on DC is my guess  

 

hey Al, nice job on your new press too, looks good. I like how you did the base and made it a benchtop. Cool.

 

*sniff* youse guys don't need me anymore...

hehehehe :P  :P

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Actually it was a Mig.  I've been welding for a couple of years now off and on and was self taught.  I have the basics down and now try making the beads pretty now. I get lucky on some and not so lucky on others.  Just a couple of days ago I learned to go side to side when laying the bead instead of back and forth.

 

Anyhow, thanks for the comments and I am going to have the ram come down and just build a rolling cart for it.

 

I wonder what my neighbors will think when they see fire and presses coming out of my garage at night.

 

Can't wait for summer again.

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Cool, nice big beads for a mig, it looks fine so far.

Your neighbors will think yer wayy cool

:blues:

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Hi Randal, mine was 7014 on a 220V Lincoln.I managed to knock off about 30-40 per cent of the weight from the old press.

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Yeah, I liked the improvement of the tube over the original channel too, although I put mine altogether as a stand-alone self-contained unit, it's not as convienient to move. But it has a small footprint so it's not a big issue.

I definately like the tube better. Seems stiffer and looks a whole lot better, and more room around the dies too.

I still got the bungie cords to hold the dies too.  :)

 

With all the things I tried too hold the dies in place, the bungees still work the best by far.

Go figure...

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Yeah, I use the rubber cords from Princess Auto. One reason I could never move to the USA- giving up trips to Princess Auto would be too hard. (Home of the 39.99 7" grinder!)

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They got "harbour freight" down here, but ain't nowhere near as cool as the Princess.  I think lawyers help stock shelves here... ( oh no, they might hurt themselves with that...)

 

I'm movin in with Jake soon hehehehe, jsut don't tell him...

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Just a couple of days ago I learned to go side to side when laying the bead instead of back and forth.

I was taught to do little circular motions ....... but my welding isn't so hot either ... ok well it IS hot .... it's welding so it would be ........ but it's messy and occasionally infested with splatter

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This might sound a little wierd, but it's just opinion not directed at anybody ( hehehe) but, ya know, us blacksmiths done went and invented welding. It's our art, it doesn't belong to anybody else. A guy who just welds is a blacksmith who only learned to weld and skipped the rest of it. It's good to be proficient at welding of all kinds in our craft, it makes us better. If you can weld with gas, or in the forge, or electricity as well if need be, then a huge part of the tool-making equation has been resolved. We ARE the original toolmakers. Without the smith the puters we play on do not exist. The painter doesn't have a brush, no shears to get the wool, no robotic arm to put the door on the suv.

Man, a good weld can solve a lot of problems.

Hell, learn how to braze too, and to solder with an iron.

Doesn't even really need to be pretty, just good. ( that lets Don off the hook hehehe)

The very best metalworkers around here can solder, braze and weld if need be. Check out Kelso's stuff.

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Hey, let's face it, without us toolmakers going back to Ogg the spearpoint and scraper maker all other trades would have never existed.

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