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Tire/Japanese Spring Power Hammer Build


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I am pretty pumped. This week I was able to borrow a customers old late and machine the Tup, aluminum bronze bearing sleeve and hammer head.

 

Turning the tup. I splurged on this piece of material. Prehardened 4140 about 35 Hrc. Hammer head is the same material.

 

machining tup.jpg

 

Boring out the sleeve. I lucked out here. My customer is actually a friend of mine as well.This was a drop that he had and gave it to me. :D

machining sleeve2.jpg

 

The three parts together. There is a counter bore on the mating side of the head to fit over the boss on the tup. Helps keep it centered while bolting it up. I will drill and tap six holes in the tup I( I hope)and install stud bolts. Drilled holes in the hammer head will fit over the studs so that it can be bolted to the tup. Lets me add other types of heads if I so desire. The whole Morse taper thing I saw on the Japanese hammers just did not make sense to me. I guess it works but driving a wedge up into the tup with every hit did not seem conducive to long life. On the top of the sleeve you can just see a counter bore as well. Plan is to capture some felt in there and load it with oil for lubrication.

tup.hammer.sleeve.jpg

parts.jpg

head cbore.jpg

 

All parts dry fit. Still some holes to drill but the major machining is DONE!

Head and tup weigh in at 110lbs.

assembled.jpg

 

My question at this point is whether or no to harden the hammer head more. At 35 Hrc, it takes a pretty good hit with a hammer to mark it. I may leave it as is and see how it works before I go to the trouble of re-hardening and tempering.

Edited by Danocon
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OK-FOUNDATION time   One of my not so favorite things.   Set and ready to go. 75 bags of 60lb concrete mix, big horse watering bucket and a great mixer I got on sale at Northern tool. It can mix t

That's an ingenious shaft-polishing setup you have there.

This is the first run for Finn the power hammer on hot steel. It is also the first firing for the forge. Nothing fancy, just forging down some orishigane I made in an earlier version of the forge out

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Hey Dan that looks great! Can't wait to see it all together. As long as your hitting hot metal I bet 35rc will be fine for a while.

 

Matt

 

Thanks Matt,

 

That's what I think as well.

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OK-FOUNDATION time

 

One of my not so favorite things.

 

Set and ready to go. 75 bags of 60lb concrete mix, big horse watering bucket and a great mixer I got on sale at Northern tool. It can mix two bags at once. Or I should say, it and I can mix and pour two bags at once. It can probably do more.

ready to go.jpg

 

Formed up and rebar set. Now before Ya'll raz me about my sloppy rebar placement let me tell you this-I HATE SETTING AND TYING REBAR.

 

I am usually very precise but to my eye this is plenty good enough. I am also not going to 'splain the shape of the forms. It will become clear later.

rebar.jpg

 

Mixing

mixing it up.jpg

 

Pouring

filling it up.jpg

 

Filled up.

I know better than to mix concrete too wet but this last pour had too much water. I scooped as much as I could off of the top. Hope it is not too weak. This is just a base for the hammer frame and should not take much of a beating. The part under the anvil is a different story.

filled.jpg

 

This is one of two bottom base pieces for the anvil. The bolts with big washers are concrete anchors.

anchors.jpg

 

First one set into the concrete. Painted plywood base shock absorber between anvil and concrete.

set in place.jpg

 

The morning after. You can just make out the two anvil base pieces to the right.

The morning after.jpg

 

End view showing the concrete forge aprons as well. I tore down the temporary firebrick forge that was for testing. Will now built something more permanent.

endview.jpg

 

Total of 71 bags of concrete mixed and poured. Not to shabby for a guy walking into his 60th year. As you can tell-I am not winding down my life.

I can hear some of you saying " Dang Dan-You been doin' this forever. Just build your fire and make something for cryin' out loud. I know-I have said these things to myself. But at this point in my life how and where I work has become as important as what I make. All I have done up to this point in my life has led me to here. I think before I was not ready for the swords so I moved down different paths. Now is the time. I have lead a consciously healthy life and while nothing can be foreseen I feel confident moving into the next decade.

 

The plan is to sweat it out through the summer building and refining my workspace and fire up in earnest in the fall. In April, 60 will find me hammerin' on Texas smelted steel. :D

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SETTING THE ANVIL

 

You saw me putting this together in this thread

 

Decided not to fill the gaps. It was so solid with a 8 pound sledge. Can always change it later if it vibrates loose. Still need to grind and clean up the face piece.

 

anvil21.jpg

 

anvil23.jpg

 

anvil24.jpg

anvil22.jpg

Edited by Danocon
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Dan, this is one of the coolest projects I've seen in a while. You're setting it up like a traditional japanese forge with a pit to stand in?

 

Zeb

Zeb,

 

Yep, that's the plan.

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Dan I think you could kick the crap out of "The most interesting man in the world". Doing all that concrete by yourself. Dang. You would out last me at working, and I am .5 your age. The smithy is coming together nicely.

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Dan I think you could kick the crap out of "The most interesting man in the world".

 

 

HAHA!

 

I have at times thought he was kind of a Wus :lol:

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Looking good, Dan. Looking very good.

Are you gonna have us all down there for a hammerin one day after is up and running?

 

Jesus,

 

You betcha! I have eight acres to spread out in. Spring would be something to shoot for. 'Course we might have to dodge those pesky tornadoes. :unsure:

Maybe Fall is a better idea ;)

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Outstanding looking project there Dan!! I see the little hand snafu in Maryland hasn't slowed you down one bit. I'd love to throw my name in to show up at any gathering you have. As a fellow (now misplaced) Texan I look for almost any reason to go back. Looking forward to seeing the rest of the story

Denis

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  • 2 weeks later...

Updaaaates?!?!?!?

 

Sorry Sam,

 

Been Bussssy.

I don't mind telling you this is hard. Would be easier if I had better fabrication skills. I am so tired of drilling holes.

 

Teaser photo

build4.jpg

 

More here

Edited by Danocon
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whatever your doin... keep doing it. ! that looks great

-my bros does alot of designing of metal stuff and he likes bolts.. reason was you've got good values on how much it'll hold ... why as welds are anyones guess

 

just one observation... from the japanese ones i saw on the net.. they have the same x in the middle of the frame to stop it from racking... but they usually have a circle in the middle with some way of adjusting the tension on the struts .. ( hard to explain )

 

 

I'm jealous

 

G

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I would be REALLY concerned about the frame shaking itself apart if solely bolted together, my plan would be to weld everything together once the design was finalised and tested.

 

Unless the bolts are an exact fit into holes that have been reamed to size then there is a potential for movement, and once they start moving they'll quickly fret in the holes and wear them oval.

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just one observation... from the japanese ones i saw on the net.. they have the same x in the middle of the frame to stop it from racking... but they usually have a circle in the middle with some way of adjusting the tension on the struts .. ( hard to explain )

 

 

 

 

G

Greg,

 

I know exactly what you mean.

post-28069-127795691207.jpg

I looked real hard at doing it that way. But everything seemed so solid I opted to leave out that level of complexity. I may regret it later but can add it if need be.

 

My big concern at the moment is how close the anchor bolts will be to the edge of the concrete.

foot.jpg

Didn't think that one all the way through :angry: . I am afraid the corner will just break off. Either when I drive in the wedging anchor bolts or during operation. I think I will make some long (12" on each leg) heavy duty steel L corner brackets that I can anchor in to the side of the pad well back from the corners to reinforce them. Just means I have to drill more holes in concrete :(.

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Sorry Sam,

 

Been Bussssy.

I don't mind telling you this is hard. Would be easier if I had better fabrication skills. I am so tired of drilling holes.

 

Teaser photo

build4.jpg

 

More here

 

A small investment in corded drills will go along way in reducing labor and prevent your batteries from crapping out early. They can bring that fresh battery cut to the job, but never weaken. Since I sold my welder I have been drilling a lot. Some inexpensive Harbor freight drills are out performing my expensive cordless in a big way.

I always had a corded drill as back up, but I put it into storage when we moved. Turns out It would have been better to take them with me...

I am following your hammer build with interest...

Patrick

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Hi

 

ah very good, you got a perfect pic of it.. no worry, if it becomes a problem later with racking.. then you just unbolt your x and then fab up an x with the circle... and bolt her up !! nice having bolts.. it'll be easy to modify

 

 

about the feet.. for a powerhammer base it is good to cast the threaded rod in the cement base... with a sort of T at the bottom of the long bolt in the base... so you have the rod sticking up out of the base in four corners... then you lower the hammer down over the threaded rod ends and put nuts on them..

 

i know ... too late for that... but what you can do is weld a plate to the bottom feet... to relocate the bolt holes on the inside of the hammer frame.. its a simple flange to make up.. ... also i think the angle iron ends may want to eat into the cement while hammering .... the foot flange would help with that aswell

 

if you used some screening in the cement... maybe it'll be ok.. but i'd worry about it .. better off to move the hole location.. (i think ??)

 

 

very nice build

 

G

Edited by Greg Thomas Obach
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